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Paul Desmond|Take Ten

Take Ten

Paul Desmond

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Now listeners enter the heart of the Paul Desmond/Jim Hall sessions, a great quartet date with Gene Cherico manning the bass (Gene Wright deputizes on the title track) and MJQ drummer Connie Kay displaying other sides of his personality. Everyone wanted Desmond to come up with a sequel to the monster hit "Take Five"; and so he did, reworking the tune and playfully designating the meter as 10/8. Hence "Take Ten," a worthy sequel with a solo that has a Middle-Eastern feeling akin to Desmond's famous extemporaneous excursion with Brubeck in "Le Souk" back in 1954. It was here that Desmond also unveiled a spin-off of the then-red-hot bossa nova groove that he called "bossa antigua" (a sardonic play-on-words meaning "old thing"), which laid the ground for Desmond's next album and a few more later in the decade. Two of the best examples are his own tunes, the samba-like "El Prince" (named after arranger Bob Prince), an infectious number with on-the-wing solo flights that you can't get out of your head, and the haunting "Embarcadero." Hall now gets plenty of room to stretch out, supported by Kay's gently dropped bombs, and he is the perfect understated swinging foil for the wistful altoist. There is not a single track here that isn't loaded with ingeniously worked out, always melodic ideas.
© Richard S. Ginell /TiVo

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Take Ten

Paul Desmond

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1
Take Ten
00:03:09

Eugene Wright, Bass - Paul Desmond, Composer - Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - George Avakian, Producer - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar

Originally released 1963. All rights reserved by Sony Music Entertainment

2
El Prince
00:03:35

Paul Desmond, Composer - Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - Paul Desmond, Lyricist - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Ray Hall, Recording Engineer - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar

Originally released 1963. All rights reserved by Sony Music Entertainment

3
Alone Together
00:06:53

Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Connie Kay, Drums - Arthur Schwartz, Composer - Jim Hall, Guitar - Howard Dietz, Lyricist

Originally released 1963. All rights reserved by Sony Music Entertainment

4
Embarcadero
00:04:08

Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - Paul Desmond, Composer - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar

Originally released 1963. All rights reserved by Sony Music Entertainment

5
The Theme from "Black Orpheus"
00:04:13

Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Antonio Maria, Composer - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar - Luiz Bonfá, Composer

Originally released 1963. All rights reserved by Sony Music Entertainment

6
Nancy
00:06:06

Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Phil Silvers, Composer - Jimmy Van Heusen, Lyricist - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar

Originally released 1963. All rights reserved by Sony Music Entertainment

7
Samba De Orpheu
00:04:29

Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar - Luiz Bonfá, Composer

Originally released 1963. All rights reserved by Sony Music Entertainment

8
The One I Love Belongs To Somebody Else
00:05:41

Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar - Isham Jones, Composer - Gus Kahn, Lyricist

Recorded Prior to 1972. All Rights Reserved by BMG Entertainment

9
Out of Nowhere
00:06:59

Edward Heyman, Lyricist - Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - George Avakian, Producer - George Duvivier, Bass - Johnny Green, Composer - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar

Originally Recorded 1963. All rights reserved by BMG Music

10
Embarcadero (alternate take)
00:04:57

Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - Paul Desmond, Composer - Paul Desmond, Lyricist - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar

Recorded Prior to 1972. All Rights Reserved by BMG Entertainment

11
El Prince (alternate take)
00:05:39

Paul Desmond, Alto Saxophone - Paul Desmond, Composer - Paul Desmond, Lyricist - George Avakian, Producer - Gene Cherico, Bass - Connie Kay, Drums - Jim Hall, Guitar

Recorded Prior to 1972. All Rights Reserved by BMG Entertainment

Album review

Now listeners enter the heart of the Paul Desmond/Jim Hall sessions, a great quartet date with Gene Cherico manning the bass (Gene Wright deputizes on the title track) and MJQ drummer Connie Kay displaying other sides of his personality. Everyone wanted Desmond to come up with a sequel to the monster hit "Take Five"; and so he did, reworking the tune and playfully designating the meter as 10/8. Hence "Take Ten," a worthy sequel with a solo that has a Middle-Eastern feeling akin to Desmond's famous extemporaneous excursion with Brubeck in "Le Souk" back in 1954. It was here that Desmond also unveiled a spin-off of the then-red-hot bossa nova groove that he called "bossa antigua" (a sardonic play-on-words meaning "old thing"), which laid the ground for Desmond's next album and a few more later in the decade. Two of the best examples are his own tunes, the samba-like "El Prince" (named after arranger Bob Prince), an infectious number with on-the-wing solo flights that you can't get out of your head, and the haunting "Embarcadero." Hall now gets plenty of room to stretch out, supported by Kay's gently dropped bombs, and he is the perfect understated swinging foil for the wistful altoist. There is not a single track here that isn't loaded with ingeniously worked out, always melodic ideas.
© Richard S. Ginell /TiVo

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