Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Nicolas Hodges|Peter Ablinger: Voices & Piano

Peter Ablinger: Voices & Piano

Nicolas Hodges, Peter Ablinger

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Download not available

Superficially, German composer Peter Ablinger's Voices and Piano bears some resemblance to Steve Reich's Different Trains. Both use recorded voices as their basis and add music that follows the contours of the speech. Unlike Reich, Ablinger does not develop the musical material to the point that it takes on a life of its own; the "accompaniment" is tied, sometimes note for note, to the spoken words, and rather than establishing a tonal center based on the inflections of the voice, it is relentlessly atonal, manically darting over the whole keyboard, often at the extremes of high and low. He uses brief audio clips, some by very famous personalities, and some by people whose voices he simply finds interesting. Ablinger's goal is to create about 80 portraits, but at the time of the recording, he had written 19, enough to fill a CD to its limit. A number of languages are represented -- English, by Bertolt Brecht, Gertrude Stein, Morton Feldman, Marcel Duchamp, and Orson Welles; Polish, by Lech Walesa; French, by Jean-Paul Sartre; German, by Martin Heidegger and Hanns Eisler; Chinese, by Mao Tse-Tung; and Italian, by Pier Paolo Pasolini, for example -- and the impact of each piece is undeniably related to being able to understand the language. When the meaning of the speech is clear, it's possible to hear the subtle ways in which Ablinger's music comments on it, but when it is not, the effect is so abstract that it's more difficult to find musical meaning in it. While there are indeed subtle differences between the musical treatments of the speeches, quite a lot of them sound so much alike in their dissonance and disjunction that there is a tendency to tune out the piano as obtrusive background noise and just listen to the voices. Several stand as especially insightful and musically intriguing because they comment on the voice and the meaning of the text rather than rigidly following its rhythms, particularly the movements devoted to Morton Feldman and Orson Welles. Mother Theresa is unique because more than half of the piece is for piano alone. Nicolas Hodges plays the treacherous piano part with confidence and sensitivity to the rhythmic flexibility of the voices. This is music that could reward close study, but it is not likely to appeal to the casual listener. The sound is mostly good, except that, inexplicably, some voices are so quiet that they can only be heard above the piano with difficulty.
© TiVo

More info

Peter Ablinger: Voices & Piano

Nicolas Hodges

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 90 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 90 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From kr125,00/month

1
Voices & Piano: No. 1, Bertolt Brecht
00:02:36

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

2
Voices & Piano: No. 2, Gertrude Stein
00:03:45

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

3
Voices & Piano: No. 3, Lech Walesa
00:03:02

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

4
Voices & Piano: No. 4, Morton Feldman
00:05:10

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

5
Voices & Piano: No. 5, Hanna Schygulla
00:02:37

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

6
Voices & Piano: No. 6, Mao Tse-tung
00:06:38

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

7
Voices & Piano: No. 7, Guillaume Apollinaire
00:03:20

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

8
Voices & Piano: No. 8, Bonnie Barnett
00:03:02

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

9
Voices & Piano: No. 9, Jean-Paul Sartre
00:05:41

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

10
Voices & Piano: No. 10, Martin Heidegger
00:04:36

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

11
Voices & Piano: No. 11, Marcel Duchamp
00:04:50

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

12
Voices & Piano: No. 12, Heimito von Doderer
00:03:10

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

13
Voices & Piano: No. 13, Orson Welles
00:02:51

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

14
Voices & Piano: No. 14, Anjezë Gonxhe Bojaxhiu (Mother Theresa)
00:01:34

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

15
Voices & Piano: No. 15, Rolf Dieter Brinkmann
00:03:39

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

16
Voices & Piano: No. 16, Hanns Eisler
00:03:21

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

17
Voices & Piano: No. 17, Ezra Pound
00:04:10

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

18
Voices & Piano: No. 18, Ilya Prigogine
00:07:34

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

19
Voices & Piano: No. 19, Pier Paolo Pasolini
00:04:04

Nicolas Hodges, MainArtist - Peter Ablinger, Composer

2020 2011 KAIROS 2020 2011 KAIROS

Album Description

Superficially, German composer Peter Ablinger's Voices and Piano bears some resemblance to Steve Reich's Different Trains. Both use recorded voices as their basis and add music that follows the contours of the speech. Unlike Reich, Ablinger does not develop the musical material to the point that it takes on a life of its own; the "accompaniment" is tied, sometimes note for note, to the spoken words, and rather than establishing a tonal center based on the inflections of the voice, it is relentlessly atonal, manically darting over the whole keyboard, often at the extremes of high and low. He uses brief audio clips, some by very famous personalities, and some by people whose voices he simply finds interesting. Ablinger's goal is to create about 80 portraits, but at the time of the recording, he had written 19, enough to fill a CD to its limit. A number of languages are represented -- English, by Bertolt Brecht, Gertrude Stein, Morton Feldman, Marcel Duchamp, and Orson Welles; Polish, by Lech Walesa; French, by Jean-Paul Sartre; German, by Martin Heidegger and Hanns Eisler; Chinese, by Mao Tse-Tung; and Italian, by Pier Paolo Pasolini, for example -- and the impact of each piece is undeniably related to being able to understand the language. When the meaning of the speech is clear, it's possible to hear the subtle ways in which Ablinger's music comments on it, but when it is not, the effect is so abstract that it's more difficult to find musical meaning in it. While there are indeed subtle differences between the musical treatments of the speeches, quite a lot of them sound so much alike in their dissonance and disjunction that there is a tendency to tune out the piano as obtrusive background noise and just listen to the voices. Several stand as especially insightful and musically intriguing because they comment on the voice and the meaning of the text rather than rigidly following its rhythms, particularly the movements devoted to Morton Feldman and Orson Welles. Mother Theresa is unique because more than half of the piece is for piano alone. Nicolas Hodges plays the treacherous piano part with confidence and sensitivity to the rhythmic flexibility of the voices. This is music that could reward close study, but it is not likely to appeal to the casual listener. The sound is mostly good, except that, inexplicably, some voices are so quiet that they can only be heard above the piano with difficulty.
© TiVo

About the album

Improve album information

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

More on Qobuz
By Nicolas Hodges

Ludwig van Beethoven | Harrison Birtwistle: A Bag of Bagatelles

Nicolas Hodges

Pauset: Canons

Nicolas Hodges

Pauset: Canons Nicolas Hodges

Aperghis: Works for Piano

Nicolas Hodges

Aperghis: Works for Piano Nicolas Hodges

Bill Hopkins - Complete Piano Music

Nicolas Hodges

Piano Recital: Hodges, Nicolas - REDGATE, R. / CLARKE, J.

Nicolas Hodges

Playlists

You may also like...

Eclipse

Hilary Hahn

Eclipse Hilary Hahn

Sibelius: Complete Symphonies

Klaus Mäkelä

The New Four Seasons - Vivaldi Recomposed

Max Richter

Old Friends New Friends

Nils Frahm

Nightscapes

Magdalena Hoffmann

Nightscapes Magdalena Hoffmann
In your panoramas...
The Earth’s Song: The World of Gustav Mahler

What could have prompted Gustav Mahler to compose a work as unclassifiable as this one? Written between 1907 and 1908, a pivotal period in Mahler's life, The Song of the Earth occupies a special place within his oeuvre. It combines the “fin de siècle” spirit with the fascination for the exotic that was spreading amongst his peers at the time. Vienna was in turmoil when this music was composed, and the piece oscillates between the notions of farewell and new beginnings. With a lot of layers to peel back, The Song of the Earth definitely merits a closer look.

Nelson Freire, a Humble Virtuoso

A child prodigy in his native country, the Brazilian pianist who passed away in November 2021 kept his distance from the noisy fanfare of fame. His enormous hands and his natural and virtuoso technique always assisted his full, powerful and mellow sound. Here Qobuz looks back at the career of a musician that for a long time was the “best-kept secret in the world of the piano”.

Max Richter, Neo-classical Activist

With the release of his new album Exile, a reflection on exile with the Baltic Sea Orchestra, the iconoclast and prolific pioneer of the neo-classical movement confirms his status as one of the most ideologically committed artists out there. Melding classical and electronic music, physical and emotional worlds, he produces instrumental works of rare evocative power.

In the news...