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Paco de Lucía|Live In America (Live In America / 1993)

Live In America (Live In America / 1993)

Paco De Lucía

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Recorded live in 1993 when Paco de Lucia was touring with his sextet, this is real artistry. De Lucia has never been afraid to push the boundaries of flamenco, and with his sextet he does just that. The music is moved by the spirit of the tradition, but never constrained by it. Like his show, the music builds, as he begins solo on "Mi Niño Curro," then other members join him before it all culminates in a gloriously grinning "Buana Buana King Kong." There's plenty of well-known de Lucia material here, like "Zyryab" and "Tio Sabas," but on-stage there's more freedom to stretch out than in the studio. That he's been influenced by his work with other guitarists is apparent in his approach, which sometimes takes on the colors of a jazz-flamenco fusion. But there are still plenty of moments of duende, the transcendence that's all important in flamenco. And time and time again, de Lucia effortlessly proves he's the world's greatest living flamenco guitar player, with ideas, runs, and shifts that stagger the imagination. About the only fault to find with this album is that it's not long enough.
© Chris Nickson /TiVo

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Live In America (Live In America / 1993)

Paco de Lucía

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1
Mi Nino Curro (Live Instrumental)
00:08:29

Francisco Sanchez Gomez, Composer - Paco de Lucia, Producer, MainArtist - Gomes Ramon Sanchez, Composer

℗ 1993 Universal Music Spain, S.L.

2
La Barrosa (Live Instrumental)
00:04:54

Francisco Sanchez Gomez, Composer - Paco de Lucia, Producer, MainArtist - Gomes Ramon Sanchez, Composer

℗ 1993 Universal Music Spain, S.L.

3
Alcazar De Sevilla (Live)
00:08:53

Pepe De Lucía, Author - Carlos Lencero, Author - Paco de Lucia, Composer, Producer, MainArtist - Diego Amador, Author

℗ 1993 Universal Music Spain, S.L.

4
Peroche (Live Instrumental)
00:06:27

Paco de Lucia, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1993 Universal Music Spain, S.L.

5
Tio Sabas (Live Instrumental)
00:06:34

Francisco Sanchez Gomez, ComposerLyricist - Paco de Lucia, Producer, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Universal Music Spain, S.L.

6
Soniquete (Live Instrumental)
00:06:48

Paco de Lucia, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1993 Universal Music Spain, S.L.

7
Zyryab (Live Instrumental)
00:12:52

Francisco Sanchez Gomez, Composer - Paco de Lucia, Producer, MainArtist - Joan Albert Amargós, Composer - Gomes Ramon Sanchez, Composer

℗ 1993 Universal Music Spain, S.L.

8
Buana Buana King Kong (Live In America / 1993)
00:05:13

Pepe De Lucía, Vocalist, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Paco de Lucia, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1993 Universal Music Spain, S.L.

Album Description

Recorded live in 1993 when Paco de Lucia was touring with his sextet, this is real artistry. De Lucia has never been afraid to push the boundaries of flamenco, and with his sextet he does just that. The music is moved by the spirit of the tradition, but never constrained by it. Like his show, the music builds, as he begins solo on "Mi Niño Curro," then other members join him before it all culminates in a gloriously grinning "Buana Buana King Kong." There's plenty of well-known de Lucia material here, like "Zyryab" and "Tio Sabas," but on-stage there's more freedom to stretch out than in the studio. That he's been influenced by his work with other guitarists is apparent in his approach, which sometimes takes on the colors of a jazz-flamenco fusion. But there are still plenty of moments of duende, the transcendence that's all important in flamenco. And time and time again, de Lucia effortlessly proves he's the world's greatest living flamenco guitar player, with ideas, runs, and shifts that stagger the imagination. About the only fault to find with this album is that it's not long enough.
© Chris Nickson /TiVo

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