Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Don Cherry|Live At Café Montmartre, Vol. 3

Live At Café Montmartre, Vol. 3

Don Cherry

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

This third and final recording of the 1966 Don Cherry Quintet recorded at the Cafe Montmartre in Copenhagen, Denmark, is conclusive in many ways. On the two 20-plus-minute professed "suites" heard here, the bandmembers bring their collective sound together with every passing phrase. They seem to have a telepathy and single-minded sense of purpose that borders on alchemy. Historically, American-born Cherry is fronting an international group, perhaps the first of its kind, with German vibist Karl Berger, Italian drummer Aldo Romano, Danish bassist Bo Stief, and a young bold and fiery tenor saxophonist from Argentina, Gato Barbieri. Cherry has a bond with Barbieri that goes beyond symmetry or unity -- it's absolutely primal, unified and whole beyond imagination. The rhythm team, skilled and very familiar with how they play together, change themes and pacings at will -- an electrifying and dynamic duo. Berger's forceful, tuneful vibraphone playing has an orchestral quality, placed comfortably in the middle of this tornado of creative music, and knows just how to shade, accent, and push the harmonic content of this band ever onward. The best thing about these musicians is that they do not have to calculate, plot, or scheme to create this exciting music -- they just go! "Complete Communion" offers multiple themes, mostly in the hard bop realm, generally very fast but sometimes slowed in bluesy and soulful moods, in the main hypertensive, or at times even patient. Barbieri's tenor solos wail, or are corralled in singing unity with Cherry's approximate notation. During this piece, which was to become their magnum opus, they quote the melody from Antonio Carlos Jobim's "How Insensitive." A completely free intro thematically fires up the jumping melody to "Remembrance," starting as a bluesy bop swinger buoyed by Berger's shimmering and quick chords as Barbieri and Cherry convene on several shout choruses drenched in harmony far beyond the pale. The band startlingly changes colors and pace at will, the drama factor is high, and a rock & roll insert a bit staggering. The band wittily reprises Ray Brown's "Two Bass Hit," and Romano's drum solo is as tasty as his ensemble work. Clearly one of the great -- if not the greatest -- early creative post-bop bands of all time, it's wonderful to have three full volumes of this combo at the peak of its powers, recorded and reproduced very well so the balance of all instruments is sharply defined. If you are a fan of any of the participants, these are must-have issues that will last a lifetime.
© Michael G. Nastos /TiVo

More info

Live At Café Montmartre, Vol. 3

Don Cherry

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 80 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 80 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From kr125,00/month

Complete Communion (Don Cherry)

1
Complete Communion
00:26:11

Gato Barbieri, Performer - Don Cherry, Performer - Bo Steif, Performer - Aldo Romano, Performer - Karl Berger, Performer - Don Cherry, Composer

2012 ESP-Disk 2012 ESP-Disk

Remembrance (Don Cherry)

2
Remembrance
00:24:45

Bo Steif, Performer - Aldo Romano, Performer - Karl Berger, Performer - Don Cherry, Performer - Gato Barbieri, Performer - Don Cherry, Composer

2012 ESP-Disk 2012 ESP-Disk

Album Description

This third and final recording of the 1966 Don Cherry Quintet recorded at the Cafe Montmartre in Copenhagen, Denmark, is conclusive in many ways. On the two 20-plus-minute professed "suites" heard here, the bandmembers bring their collective sound together with every passing phrase. They seem to have a telepathy and single-minded sense of purpose that borders on alchemy. Historically, American-born Cherry is fronting an international group, perhaps the first of its kind, with German vibist Karl Berger, Italian drummer Aldo Romano, Danish bassist Bo Stief, and a young bold and fiery tenor saxophonist from Argentina, Gato Barbieri. Cherry has a bond with Barbieri that goes beyond symmetry or unity -- it's absolutely primal, unified and whole beyond imagination. The rhythm team, skilled and very familiar with how they play together, change themes and pacings at will -- an electrifying and dynamic duo. Berger's forceful, tuneful vibraphone playing has an orchestral quality, placed comfortably in the middle of this tornado of creative music, and knows just how to shade, accent, and push the harmonic content of this band ever onward. The best thing about these musicians is that they do not have to calculate, plot, or scheme to create this exciting music -- they just go! "Complete Communion" offers multiple themes, mostly in the hard bop realm, generally very fast but sometimes slowed in bluesy and soulful moods, in the main hypertensive, or at times even patient. Barbieri's tenor solos wail, or are corralled in singing unity with Cherry's approximate notation. During this piece, which was to become their magnum opus, they quote the melody from Antonio Carlos Jobim's "How Insensitive." A completely free intro thematically fires up the jumping melody to "Remembrance," starting as a bluesy bop swinger buoyed by Berger's shimmering and quick chords as Barbieri and Cherry convene on several shout choruses drenched in harmony far beyond the pale. The band startlingly changes colors and pace at will, the drama factor is high, and a rock & roll insert a bit staggering. The band wittily reprises Ray Brown's "Two Bass Hit," and Romano's drum solo is as tasty as his ensemble work. Clearly one of the great -- if not the greatest -- early creative post-bop bands of all time, it's wonderful to have three full volumes of this combo at the peak of its powers, recorded and reproduced very well so the balance of all instruments is sharply defined. If you are a fan of any of the participants, these are must-have issues that will last a lifetime.
© Michael G. Nastos /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Ascenseur pour l'échafaud

Miles Davis

Jacob's Ladder

Brad Mehldau

Jacob's Ladder Brad Mehldau

Your Queen Is A Reptile

Sons Of Kemet

Your Queen Is A Reptile Sons Of Kemet

Delta Kream

The Black Keys

Delta Kream The Black Keys
More on Qobuz
By Don Cherry

The Summer House Sessions

Don Cherry

Complete Communion

Don Cherry

Complete Communion Don Cherry

Home Boy, Sister Out

Don Cherry

Cherry Jam

Don Cherry

Cherry Jam Don Cherry

Organic Music Society

Don Cherry

Playlists

You may also like...

Shifting Sands

Avishai Cohen

Shifting Sands Avishai Cohen

Black Acid Soul

Lady Blackbird

Black Acid Soul Lady Blackbird

Welcome to the Black Forest (The Sounds of MPS)

Various Interprets

Sunset In The Blue

Melody Gardot

Sunset In The Blue Melody Gardot

Kind Of Blue

Miles Davis

Kind Of Blue Miles Davis
In your panoramas...
Ornette Coleman is the question!

Great pioneer of free jazz, and majestic figure of the musical avant-garde of the 20th Century, the Texan saxophonist always inspired a strong reaction.

Tango: Sounds of the Río de la Plata

Rooted in dance and eventually becoming its very own artistic movement, the history of tango is an epic one; and its future truly looks limitless. A musical genre with hybrid origins, it remains one of the most incredible creations to come out of Río de la Plata. “It’s the only thing we don’t ask Europe for its opinion on,” wrote Argentina’s Macedonio Fernández, the man that young Jorge Luis Borges admired “to the point of devout and passionate plagiarism.” A number of coincidences in the late 19th century gave rise to this style of music. As musicologist Carlos Vega said: "no one really tried to create tango." And yet, here it is; complete with its own traditions and innovations, as well as its own golden age, ill-fated artists, myths and rituals.

Nordic Jazz in 10 Albums

Snowy scenes, big expanses, beautiful nature everywhere… Scandinavia is often described by the same old clichés. Jazz is no exception. We tend to talk about Scandi jazz like it’s one big genre. However, each country has its own distinct style; Denmark’s scene rivals traditional North American jazz, Norway tends to get experimental and Sweden treads the line between the two. Nordic musicians have been adding their own unique touch to the genre since the 70s and the younger generation continue to sculpt its future. Here, we zoom in on Scandinavian jazz in 10 albums, offering a glimpse into a discography that’s as wide as a fjord.

In the news...