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S.L. Weiss, Pièces de luth

Diego Salamanca

Classical - Released November 23, 2020 | iMD-Seulétoile

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Diapason découverte
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CDkr100.39

Dowland : Songs for Tenor and Lute - A Musicall Banquet

Nigel Rogers

Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Warner Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Rippe : 'Un perfaict sonneur de Leut' (Works for lute)

Paul O'Dette

Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Do you know Albert de Rippe or Alberto da Ripa, Alberto da Mantova, or indeed Alberto Mantovano? Thanks to the new album from lutenist Paul O'Dette recorded in Quebec in 2016, we have become acquainted with one of the most important lute players and composers of the Renaissance. Born around 1500 in Mantua or in... Ripa (currently Riva di Suzzara), at a very young age he entered the service of the King of France François I, along with a number of other Italian artists including Leonardo da Vinci. The King granted him lands in the Dombes and sums of money besides. This royal recognition is surely testament to the exceptional quality of the work of the Italian composer, who had written many "fantasies", but also arrangements for songs which were then in vogue, and several dances. Rippe also probably refused to have his works be published, preferring to keep them for himself: so they have survived to the present day only through copies made by his student Guilliaume Morlaye. Rippe's music is richly expressive and rounded off by a very accomplished writing technique, which produces rich and full sounds. Not content with 3-note chords, as most of his contemporaries were, Rippe explores his instrument with rich harmonic combinations of 5 or 6 notes, to imitate the luxuriant sound of a large choir. A passionate fan of Rippe's music, Paul O'Dette wanted to present the widest possible range from the repertoire of those times, ending his record with a stunning piece, La Séraphine. The identity of the writer isn't known precisely, but there are good reasons to believe that it is the master himself. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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CDkr105.69

Cathedral Music

Gabriele Janneck

Classical - Released September 27, 2019 | Timezone

Narvaez : Los Libros del Delphin

Xavier Díaz-Latorre

Classical - Released September 19, 2019 | Passacaille

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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CDkr143.71

Laurent de Saint-Luc : Pièces pour luth

Evangelina Mascardi

Chamber Music - Released February 9, 2018 | Musique en Wallonie

Hi-Res Booklet
Laurent de Saint-Luc was born in 1669 into a family of musicians. The reputation of his father, Jacques de Saint-Luc, had gone beyond the borders of the Spanish Netherlands: he was known all the way to Paris – where, in 1647, he performed as a theorbist at the Chapelle Royale. While Saint-Luc's father was attached to the Chapelle Royale in Brussels from 1639 to 1683, Laurent never appeared among the court musicians. Perhaps we can deduce from this that from 1691, the son was no longer in the southern Low Countries. In addition to no position at the court being forthcoming, the political situation could have led him to leave Brussels, as the League of Augsburg had turned the region into a battlefield - in 1695, a bombardment destroyed two thirds of Brussels. Although France was an enemy, Saint-Luc made for Paris and stayed there a while, and several pieces seem to confirm his presence there in this period: L’Arioste moderne refers to a work by Mme Gillot de Beaucour dating from 1685; La Belle au bois dormant to Perrault's 1696 fairytale. It was in Amsterdam that his Suites pour le luth avec un dessus et une basse ad libitum, appeared, the Livre premier in 1709, and the Livre second in 1710, but we have nothing which allows us to confidently pinpoint the composer's whereabouts at those dates. The latest historical event to which his compositions refer (they are often very descriptive: The Defeat of the French by the Germans Before Turin, The Taking of Barcelona, etc.) is the taking of Lille, in October 1708. And after that... a mystery. Thereafter, the composer generally sticks to traditional forms, but which he can still renew, not just prefacing his allemandes with unexpected preludes, but even giving them overtures or a march, while substituting for sarabande and gigue with pieces like Pour endormir l’enfant or Pastorelle. A shiny and new ancient composer, then, and the silvery lutist Evangelina Mascardi gives an intense and tender reading. © SM/Qobuz
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Mad Dog (Holborne, Johnson, Byrd, Dowland, Huwet)

Hopkinson Smith

Classical - Released May 19, 2017 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
Some people will be angry, others will laugh, but since there are many orphaned lute pieces in English sources that have come down to us with no name at all, Hopkinson Smith has taken the liberty of christening four such pieces in this program with names that seem to suit their musical spirits. The title of the album itself, Mad Dog (admittedly something that doesn’t quite sound like a respectable name for a Renaissance music album, but marketing will be marketing), is taken from such an apocryphal title given my Smith to what is really a galliard by Anthony Holborne found in the 2nd Matthew Holmes Lute Book. Ward’s Repose is a homage to Smith’s deceased musicology teacher… But, as so marvellously said by the Bard, “What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”, so who cares really what these pieces were or were not called back four hundred years ago, when wen don’t even really know who wrote or arranged some of them – and here again, what’s in a name, be it Dowland, Byrd (whose lute pieces are all rewritings of keyboards works as done by his contemporary Francis Cutting), Johnson, when just the beauty of the music counts… Hopkinson Smith plays an 8-course lute built in the 1970s by Joel van Lennep, one of the world’s foremost lute-doctors and instrument makers. © SM/Qobuz
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Bach & Weiss : Lute music

Toyohiko Satoh

Miscellaneous - Released April 1, 2015 | Carpe Diem Records Berlin

Hi-Res Booklet
Recorded April 2014, kirishima International Concert hall “Miyama Conseru” (Japan)

Silvius Leopold Weiss : Suites for Lute

Konrad Junghänel

Chamber Music - Released March 31, 2015 | Glossa

Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Claude Le Jeune : Airs et Psaumes

Claudine Ansermet

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released July 1, 2014 | Glossa

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CDkr146.19

My favorite Dowland

Paul O'Dette

Classical - Released May 19, 2014 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica

Giovanni Zamboni : Sonatas for Lute

Luciano Contini

Classical - Released April 1, 2014 | Glossa

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Jacobean Lute Music

Jakob Lindberg

Classical - Released November 1, 2013 | BIS

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
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This selection of English lute music stands out from the common run by virtue of a couple of features. First is the unusual lute played by Swedish performer Jakob Lindberg: made around 1590, and dated with dendrochronology techniques, it is "probably the oldest lute in playing condition with its original soundboard." Its gut strings do not produce the sweetest lute sound you've ever heard, but the sound has both character and variety. The second distinctive feature is the closely focused repertory, narrowed down to the Jacobean era at the beginning of the 17th century. The lute fits the concentrated, polyphonic quality of this music very well, and the recital as a whole, with the mood lightened only by some anonymous Scottish tunes that were brought in by the new king and his retinue, is unusually intimate and dense. The focus brings in some unusual composers, such as Thomas Robinson, Daniel Bacheler, and Cuthbert Hely, all of whom were formidable lutenists from the sound of it. For lute music this is a demanding hour-and-a-third of listening (somehow the BIS engineering team squeezed 81 minutes and 12 seconds of music onto a single CD), and Lindberg's energy and precision do not flag. Auditioned on a conventional stereo the recording was too close to Lindberg and contained too much extraneous noise; mileage may vary with other equipment.© TiVo
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de Visée

Toyohiko Satoh

Miscellaneous - Released April 22, 2013 | Carpe Diem Records Berlin

Hi-Res

Johann Gottfried Conradi : Neue Lauten Stucke (1724)

José Miguel Moreno

Classical - Released March 4, 2013 | Glossa

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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CDkr92.49

Bach : Sonatas & Partitas

Hopkinson Smith

Classical - Released February 25, 2002 | naïve classique

Distinctions 10 de Répertoire - Recommandé par Classica
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CDkr79.29

Lautenkonzerte (Concerti pour luth de Fasch, Haydn, Kohaut, Hagen)

Hopkinson Smith

Classical - Released February 25, 1999 | naïve classique

Distinctions 10 de Répertoire - Cannes Classical Music Award
From
CDkr79.29

Silvius Leopold Weiss : Partitas pour luth

Hopkinson Smith

Classical - Released February 25, 1998 | naïve classique

Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique - 10 de Répertoire
From
CDkr79.29

Ennemond Gaultier (dit le Vieux Gaultier ou Gaultier de Lyon) : Pièces de luth

Hopkinson Smith

Classical - Released February 25, 2000 | naïve classique

Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique - 10 de Répertoire - 4F de Télérama
From
CDkr79.29

François Dufaut : Pièces de luth en manuscrits

Hopkinson Smith

Classical - Released January 1, 1977 | naïve classique

Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique