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The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy|Hypocrisy Is The Greatest Luxury

Hypocrisy Is The Greatest Luxury

The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy

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The Disposable Heroes tackled every last big issue possible with one of 1992's most underrated efforts. Dr Dre and G-funk became all the rage by the end of the year and beyond, but for those looking for at least a little more from hip-hop than that soon-to-be-clichéd style, Hypocrisy Is the Greatest Luxury did the business. The group's origins in the Beatnigs aren't hidden at all -- besides a stunning, menacing revision of that band's "Television, the Drug of the Nation," the Heroes' first single, the combination of Bomb Squad and industrial music approaches is apparent throughout. Consolidated's Mark Pistel co-produced the album while Meat Beat Manifesto's Jack Dangers helped mix it with the band, creating a stew of deep beats and bass and a constantly busy sonic collage that hits as hard as could be wanted, but not without weirdly tender moments as well. On its own it would be a more than attractive effort, but it's Michael Franti's compelling, rich voice and his chosen subject matter that really make the band something special. Nothing is left unexamined, an analysis of the American community as a whole that embraces questions of African-American identity and commitment ("Famous and Dandy (Like Amos 'n' Andy)") to overall economic and political insanity ("The Winter of the Long Hot Summer," a gripping, quietly threatening flow of a track). There's even a great jazz/funk number, "Music and Politics," with nothing but a guitar and Franti's fine singing voice, ruminating on emotional expression in music and elsewhere with wit and sly anger. Top it off with a brilliant reworking of the Dead Kennedys' anthem "California Uber Alles," lyrics targeting the then-governor of the state, Pete Wilson, and his questionable stances, and revolutions in thought and attitude rarely sounded so good.
© Ned Raggett /TiVo

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Hypocrisy Is The Greatest Luxury

The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy

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1
Satanic Reverses
00:04:44

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

2
Famous And Dandy (Like Amos 'N' Andy)
00:06:33

Ken Kessie, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Charlie Hunter, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Michael Franti, Producer, ComposerLyricist - Mark Pistel, Producer, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel, ComposerLyricist - Jack Dangers, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

3
Television The Drug Of The Nation
00:06:38

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - Mark Pistel, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1991 UMG Recordings, Inc.

4
Language Of Violence (LP Mix)
00:06:13

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - Mark Pistel, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1991 UMG Recordings, Inc.

5
The Winter Of The Long Hot Summer
00:07:58

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - Wally Badarou, ComposerLyricist - Mark Pistel, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1991 UMG Recordings, Inc.

6
Hypocrisy Is The Greatest Luxury
00:03:47

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - Wally Badarou, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

7
Everyday Life Has Become A Health Risk
00:04:53

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1991 UMG Recordings, Inc.

8
INS Greencard A-19 191 500
00:01:37

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

9
Socio-Genetic Experiment
00:04:18

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

10
Music And Politics
00:04:01

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

11
Financial Leprosy
00:05:30

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

12
California Uber Alles
00:04:13

Jello Biafra, ComposerLyricist - Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist - John Leonard Greenway, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

13
Water Pistol Man
00:05:54

Michael Franti, ComposerLyricist - Wally Badarou, ComposerLyricist - Mark Pistel, ComposerLyricist - The Disposable Heroes Of Hiphoprisy, MainArtist

℗ 1992 UMG Recordings, Inc.

Album Description

The Disposable Heroes tackled every last big issue possible with one of 1992's most underrated efforts. Dr Dre and G-funk became all the rage by the end of the year and beyond, but for those looking for at least a little more from hip-hop than that soon-to-be-clichéd style, Hypocrisy Is the Greatest Luxury did the business. The group's origins in the Beatnigs aren't hidden at all -- besides a stunning, menacing revision of that band's "Television, the Drug of the Nation," the Heroes' first single, the combination of Bomb Squad and industrial music approaches is apparent throughout. Consolidated's Mark Pistel co-produced the album while Meat Beat Manifesto's Jack Dangers helped mix it with the band, creating a stew of deep beats and bass and a constantly busy sonic collage that hits as hard as could be wanted, but not without weirdly tender moments as well. On its own it would be a more than attractive effort, but it's Michael Franti's compelling, rich voice and his chosen subject matter that really make the band something special. Nothing is left unexamined, an analysis of the American community as a whole that embraces questions of African-American identity and commitment ("Famous and Dandy (Like Amos 'n' Andy)") to overall economic and political insanity ("The Winter of the Long Hot Summer," a gripping, quietly threatening flow of a track). There's even a great jazz/funk number, "Music and Politics," with nothing but a guitar and Franti's fine singing voice, ruminating on emotional expression in music and elsewhere with wit and sly anger. Top it off with a brilliant reworking of the Dead Kennedys' anthem "California Uber Alles," lyrics targeting the then-governor of the state, Pete Wilson, and his questionable stances, and revolutions in thought and attitude rarely sounded so good.
© Ned Raggett /TiVo

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