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Jazz - Verschijnt op 27 maart 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschijnt op 27 maart 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 14 februari 2020 | ECM

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A sage piano stylist audibly influenced by Basie and Monk among others, Carla Bley has over the past 60 years also become one of jazz's preeminent composers. Originally influenced by '60s jazz avant-garde, Bley, as evidenced by her latest, Life Goes On, has fashioned her own jazz ethos—what ECM's Manfred Eicher has called her "radical originality." In jazz groups of any size longevity is often impossible as the essence of the music is often dependent on the potential of new combinations of talent, and yet a large part of Bley's recent success is keyed by her working trio of bassist/life partner Steve Swallow and saxophonist Andy Sheppard, who've been together for 25 years. Based around three suites—her most preferred form of composition—the lean and spacious Life Goes On is wonderfully confident and distinct. The opening movement of the title track is sly blues before turning to two parts that explore her trademark melodic mingling of classical music discipline and free jazz adventure. It concludes with "And Then One Day," where Bley holds down the rhythm with a repeated figure, over which Sheppard plays jaunty lines that have more than a whiff of Paul Desmond's cool tone. "Beautiful Telephones," based upon the current chief executive's comment about the Oval Office's exceptional phones, begins with Bley downshifting emotionally and exploring a more somber mood with Swallow plucking out his notes and Sheppard's tenor saxophone providing an equally unsettling counterpoint. In this work's final movement, the tempos pick up and her characteristic humor comes to the fore as she wryly quotes "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," "The Star-Spangled Banner," "America the Beautiful," and other patriotic hymns in a modern echo of her '70s composition, "Spangled Banner Minor and Other Patriotic Songs." The final suite, "Copycat" explores the hallowed jazz device of call-and-response as a conversation between three supremely accomplished players, whose clairvoyant togetherness shifts between agreeable and discordant. While it's right to applaud the current rush of praise for the fresh energies that youth are bringing to music these days, the deep wisdom and impeccable craft of a pioneer like Bley deserves to be equally acclaimed. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 14 februari 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 14 februari 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 14 februari 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 november 2019 | ECM

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Since 1971, Keith Jarrett has been signed to ECM, which has proven to be one of the strongest and most productive relationships between an artist and their label ever. On the 16th July, 2016, the American pianist was performing the final concert of his summer tour in Munich, the stronghold of producer Manfred Eicher. On that evening, Jarrett gave the Bavarian audience an improvisational torrent, which he does so well. However, unlike these same exercises which he has performed over the decades, he delivers them here in short segments. Gone are the 20/30-minute-long tracks like on the famous Köln Concert of 1975, the Sun Bear Concerts of 1976, the Paris Concert of 1990 or the Vienna Concert of 1992! Those from Munich 2016 are separated into twelve parts and give an overview of the multifaceted tastes of their author, a (quite literally) “extra” “ordinary” musician, who can make his instrument swing like the old masters, but can also express himself with musical phrases which are rhythmically and harmoniously very complex, even daring. Over the course of the 86 minutes of Munich 2016, a juggling of silences is favoured over frenzied notes, before a bluesy motif falls away to reveal a chamber music miniature. As the minutes unfold, Jarrett continues to toe the line separating jazz and classical music. He ends this unparalleled tour de force with a fresh take on three classics (Answer Me My Love by Nat King Cole, It’s a Lonesome Old Town made famous by Sinatra and Somewhere Over the Rainbow straight out of The Wizard of Oz), which flawlessly bring this ocean of sound to an end. It is also funny to note that this particular Munich concert will be remembered for reasons beyond the music. After his cover of Over the Rainbow, and in the middle of a standing ovation, some of the audience members were taking pictures of the pianist. Furious, he grabs the microphone and says: “I’m not going to talk about the assholes who are aiming their smartphones at me. I just have one question for them: why did you come?” © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 november 2019 | ECM

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Each time she releases a new album, we find ourselves asking the same question: why aren’t there more musician like Julia Hülsmann? Of course, the jazz world is saturated with tons of great pianists, though the German pianist (who already has ten albums to her name) possesses a truly unique touch. With Not Far From Here, her chamber jazz fuses beautifully with the ECM sound, her record label since 2008. The album is wonderfully energetic and eclectic, largely thanks to the presence of the Berlin-born saxophonist Uli Kempendorff. Playing in quartet with her faithful rhythm section (composed of drummer Heinrich Köbberling and her double bassist and husband Marc Muellbauer), Hülsmann finds in Kempendorff a partner who stimulates both her compositions and performances. The quartet’s improvisations go from a cool sixties-style jazz to a more avant-garde style and outright playful sequences. United like never before, the group reveal a vast yet cohesive colour palette. The beautiful oddity of this record is a surprise cover of This Is Not America which David Bowie recorded in 1985 with the Pat Metheny Group. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 november 2019 | ECM

Booklet
Each time she releases a new album, we find ourselves asking the same question: why aren’t there more musician like Julia Hülsmann? Of course, the jazz world is saturated with tons of great pianists, though the German pianist (who already has ten albums to her name) possesses a truly unique touch. With Not Far From Here, her chamber jazz fuses beautifully with the ECM sound, her record label since 2008. The album is wonderfully energetic and eclectic, largely thanks to the presence of the Berlin-born saxophonist Uli Kempendorff. Playing in quartet with her faithful rhythm section (composed of drummer Heinrich Köbberling and her double bassist and husband Marc Muellbauer), Hülsmann finds in Kempendorff a partner who stimulates both her compositions and performances. The quartet’s improvisations go from a cool sixties-style jazz to a more avant-garde style and outright playful sequences. United like never before, the group reveal a vast yet cohesive colour palette. The beautiful oddity of this record is a surprise cover of This Is Not America which David Bowie recorded in 1985 with the Pat Metheny Group. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 november 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 25 oktober 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 25 oktober 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 25 oktober 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 25 oktober 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 4 oktober 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 4 oktober 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 27 september 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 27 september 2019 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 20 september 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Playing jazz that's "out" (meaning futuristic in a myriad of ways) is stylish and wins the respect of adventurous listeners. And yet it's also foolish to ignore artistic vision that's rooted in the wisdom of music history. After nearly two decades in The Bad Plus, Ethan Iverson left to pursue solo ventures like this quartet date recorded live in January 2017 at the Village Vanguard with the trumpeter Tom Harrell aboard. While there is little either cannot do musically—The Bad Plus has recorded covers from unlikely rock sources like Nirvana and Bowie while Harrell has shown interest in hip hop—here they settle into the well-worn groove of jazz standards with especially satisfying results. To emphasize the point that standards are never really mined out as a source of fresh interpretative insights, the foursome ease into a slow ruminative version of the Gershwin's "The Man I Love," where Harrell gives a moving, nakedly emotional performance. Instead of being the center of attention with showy solos, Iverson works as the crucial binding agent to these tightly knit quartet performances, tastefully supporting Harrell's remarkably compact solos in their opulent reading of "I Can't Get Started with You." Touches of modernity appear in Iverson's slightly off kilter intro to "Sentimental Journey." The rhythm section of bassist Ben Street and drummer Eric McPherson are pliant and potent on the slower numbers, adding a hard driving swing to Kern/Hammerstein's "All the Things You Are," and a full-on hard bop groove to "Wee." Tellingly, a pair of bluesy Iverson originals, "Philadelphia Creamer," and "Jed From Teaneck," fit seamlessly into this straight-ahead program devoted to what Iverson calls "reassessing jazz tradition and heritage." It’s a near perfect match of material and solo voices committed to a rewarding conversation. © Robert Baird / Qobuz

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