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Klassiek - Verschijnt op 27 november 2020 | CAvi-music

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The third album from Trio Image follows the success of their releases of the Piano Trio by Mauricio Kagel and Chamber music by Hans Sommer. The new album consists partly of world premiere recordings of unknown repertoire. Personal remarks by the Trio Image: "Antonín Dvorak's monumental F Minor Piano Trio has accompanied us for many years on our journey as a trio, surfacing and resurfacing in different phases of our development, affecting, challenging, and transforming us. We are fascinated and moved by its Slavic dances and melodies, by its fairy-tale elements and traces of folklore". The members of Trio Imàge stumbled upon this score by chance and were thrilled to incorporate it into their repertoire: "This early work of a mostly forgotten composer nevertheless features a series of astounding, imaginative ideas and innovations: this music is brimming with youthful emotion and lively virtuosity, along with interspersed elements of Vienna folklore and a vague presentiment of decades of terror looming on the horizon". A current representative of the same tendency is the young accordionist, dancer, arranger, and composer Marek Dyakov, who, in his works, combines folklore elements with jazz harmonies and classical means of expression. Perperikoana belongs to Ancient Bulgarian Legends, a four-part cycle dedicated to Trio Imàge. The piece displays strong associations with the music of the Rhodope Mountains, home of the Perperikon, an ancient sacred rocky hill: the landscapes of that beautiful region, with their great variety, find their echo in the piece's polyphonic structure. The title also contains a personal dedication to Ana, Dyakov's wife. © CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschijnt op 27 november 2020 | CAvi-music

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This is the second solo album from pianist Martin Klett. Claude Debussy is often labelled as a musical Impressionist. It is misleading to do so, however, since Debussy was not truly associated with the visual artists who belonged to that current. Instead, he viewed himself as an adept of Symbolism, as one can tell from his choice of texts for musical settings and from his opera Pelléas et Mélisande; he eventually turned against the association of music with imagery. In his two volumes of Préludes, the subjects or poetic descriptions were not featured as titles, but appeared in brackets at the end of each piece - more like subtitles than titles. Thus, the Préludes hark back to previous milestones in the genre: in the preludes of Bach and Chopin, the center of attention had not been musical illustration, but the keyboard per se. The aspect of magic in sound is not only prominent in Debussy's cycle of préludes, but also in another cycle: Makrokosmos, which American composer George Crumb started to write in 1972. Makrokosmos eventually grew to four volumes and acquired legendary status. The first two volumes are for solo piano; Vols. 3 and 4 are for two pianos and percussion, viz. for piano four hands, respectively. Contemporary modes of execution are prominent in all four volumes, including tapping and knocking on the piano frame, or scraping the strings. Transformation of timbre is an essential element for Crumb, who had alchemy in mind. Aspects of the occult are prominent in the first volume, which is devoted to the signs of the zodiac - not in terms of astronomy, but of astrology, i.e. the influence of zodiac signs on a person's development and character. Crumb's Makrokosmos is thus likewise a collection of character pieces such as the more Romantic ones Schumann wrote for piano in the 19th century. © Bernd Künzig/CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschijnt op 27 november 2020 | CAvi-music

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Following the critically acclaimed volumes I and II of their Mozart String Quartet series, the Armida Quartett is delighted to bring volume III in a double album. With the recordings here, the Armida Quartet has reached the halfway mark in a project that seeks to intimately explore an entire mountain range. Mozart's complete works for string quartet, to which they devote intense scrutiny within the framework of a recital series that pairs them with contemporary works specifically commissioned for the occasion. This requires the musicians to pay a particularly attentive ear: history remains unscathed, but the members of the Armida Quartet want to call ingrained listening habits into question. By implication, they explore Mozart's works as if the composer was looking over their shoulder. In collaboration with Henle music publishers and musicologist Wolf-Dieter Seiffert, they have embarked on a "workshop exploration" of Mozart's string quartets in the original manuscript. The occasional discovery of certain hitherto overlooked details leads them to interpret certain passages in exciting new ways. All the while, they gain increasing familiarity and assurance as they delve ever more deeply into the master's musical language. © CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | CAvi-music

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The very last release with Dina Ugorskaja, who passed away in September 2019 aged 46. The programme includes the 24 Preludes Op. 28 by Chopin and J.S. Bach's Inventions. J. S. Bach's Inventions - unfortunately still regarded as mere exercises - have fascinated Dina Ugorskaja since her childhood thanks to their incredibly refined wealth of ideas, particularly when it comes to just two voices, where it is up to the player to discover how able you really have to be in order to master the task. Standing in contrast to this is one of the most challenging cycles in piano music, in both a musical and a technical sense, Chopin's Preludes, with their rapid changes between different, and at times highly polarised, feelings and sentiments; a synthesis imbibed with disarming naturalness that makes it almost impossible for a performance to bring out the music itself and not the interpreter. The tension between the deceptive straightforwardness of Bach and the simplicity required by the complexity of Chopin makes this an exciting combination. © CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | CAvi-music

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"This time, I am not only an absolute musician, but also a poet", wrote Dvorak regarding the Poetic Tone Pictures, Op. 85, his most extended cycle of lyric character pieces for piano. Concluded in April/May 1889 at his summer residence in Vysoka, the Poetic Tone Pictures introduced a new tendency in Dvorak's output: from then on, he started to "poeticize" his musical style. As he wrote to his publisher Fritz Simrock: "Each piece will have its own title and is meant to express something: thus, as it were, this is program music!" This new tendency culminated in 1896-1898 with the five symphonic poems The Water Goblin Op. 107, The Noon Witch Op. 108, The Golden Spinning Wheel Op. 109, The Wild Dove Op. 110, and A Hero's Song Op. 111. The great Czech composer is hardly known for his piano works, in which he invariably seems to stand somewhat in the shadow of great Romantic masters such as Schumann or Brahms. Nonetheless, the 13 character pieces that comprise the Poetic Tone Pictures reveal an incredibly rich, enchantingly diverse world of inner images. At the same time, they offer a multitude of stylistic and pianistic surprises by combining folklore elements with subtle timbre effects. It is therefore all the more astonishing that they have been seldom performed in concert. Elena Bashkirova was looking for a new work to play: she rediscovered the neglected cycle in her score cabinet, and was immediately thrilled with Dvorak's rich and diverse palette of timbres: "I flipped through the pages, played a couple of chords, and the music captured me right away. It's so poetic, so evocative. I immediately started to see stories and pictures in my mind's eye. As a pianist, you can narrate these stories very well. They open up our hearts". Elena Bashkirova finds that the Poetic Tone Pictures, although composed in the countryside, have everything to do in terms of mood with Prague Art Deco style. She is reminded "of those marvellous fin-de-siècle windows with their beautiful female figures". And she points out that Dvorak was thinking more of human situations than of landscapes when he wrote these pieces". This is the first solo album on CAvi-music by Elena Bashkirova: the daughter of the Russian Pianist Dmitri Bashkirov and spouse of Daniel Barenboim. © CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | CAvi-music

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Arrangements, paraphrases, copies in the music world, these are just a few of the terms that designate the same genre, which has probably existed as long as art itself. What is an arrangement? Is it more or less a copy of the original, or is it an independent work in its own right? How far can the arranger stray from the original? Who is the main author: the composer or the arranger? Even from a legal point of view, this subject is so complex that no clear answer has yet been found. Throughout his life, Bach often arranged works by other composers and continually rearranged his own. This was something he found natural, and in his day and age it was nothing unusual. In the case of a great number of his works for keyboard, it is not sure whether they were intended for harpsichord, organ, or even clavichord. Simonian has always found this subject of great importance: as a pianist, if one chooses the modern grand as the medium for these pieces, one is performing Bach exclusively in "arrangement" form. In this context he decided to examine the creative interrelations among works by several composers separated by time and space: from Vivaldi to Busoni, from Bach to Franck and Liszt, in order to conceive a programme for this album with the figure and the oeuvre of Bach as connecting element. Critically acclaimed as "one of the great Bach interpreters of his generation", Stepan Simonian is driven by a yearning to explore and illuminate the multiple facets of the great works of piano repertoire, particularly by Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Beethoven, Mozart, and Bach. It is his second album on CAvi-music. © CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | CAvi-music

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Even more than in Beethoven's case, Mendelssohn's Lieder were intended for performance in the salons of the prosperous bourgeoisie: a convivial circle of highly qualified connoisseurs who shared the same outlook, and often a similar financial status. Those members of the upper middle classes were the musical link and the sociological crossroads between Hausmusik and the concert hall. Mendelssohn often wrote songs as gifts for the friends he was visiting, frequently as settings of their own texts: the considerable technical challenges they contained still needed to be manageable for members of those circles. Thanks to their songlike or folk-like character, certain works by Mendelssohn (for instance from oratorios such as Elijah) became true classics, even across broad swaths of the population. The narrower the compositional framework in his songs, the more noteworthy were Mendelssohn's divergences: he often unobtrusively proved his mastery by varying upon a strict form (extending phrases or inserting small elements of surprise in strophic songs), thus providing variety, excitement, and ironic musical fractures. Robert Schumann's Lied output was probably more crucial for his existence than in Mendelssohn's case, and likewise more significant due to the artistic dialogue he held with his wife Clara: songs thus took up a greater place in his life. Composed in Leipzig in 1840 (Schumann's well-known "year of songs"), Dichterliebe Op. 48 on texts by Heinrich Heine offers an excellent example of Schumann's use of a self-contained episode with a homogeneous poetic idea as a point of departure for an entire song cycle. Thus he not only rearranged the order of Heine's poems from the Lyric Intermezzo (published in 1827 as part of Das Buch der Lieder), but chose the title "Dichterliebe" ("The Love of a Poet") himself. Here the piano goes far beyond pure instrumental accompaniment: instead of merely illustrating the text, it provides its own dimension of interpretation as a partner on equal standing with the voice, both in terms of extension as well in terms of artistic niveau. This recital is the first solo album from German tenor Patrick Grahl, accompanied by Daniel Heide. © CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | CAvi-music

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The second album on CAvi-music with the Dutch/French/German group Flex Ensemble contains the new discovery of the arrangement from Beethoven's pupil and friend Ferdinand Ries of Beethoven's Third Symphony, "Eroica" for piano quartet. Known for their musically refined and highly energetic performances, the Flex Ensemble has been thrilling audiences with programs ranging from Classical and Romantic piano quartet repertoire to modern presentations featuring work by preeminent composers of our time, including Marton Illes and Gerard Pesson. The Flex Ensemble was awarded 1st Prize and the Special Prize for Interpretation at the International Schumann Chamber Music Award in Frankfurt in 2013. They were also winners of the Gianni Bergamo Classic Music Award 2015 in Lugano and the recipient of awards at the Kiejstut Bacewicz International Chamber Music Competition in Lódz and the Premio Trio di Trieste. © CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 september 2020 | CAvi-music

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Born in Tarnopol in former Austria-Hungary (now Ukraine) in 1906, Karol Rathaus’ career was brought to a halt by the First World War, just like those of many other young artists from that dark period. In the 1920s, Rathaus began what would be a sensational career as a composer. He was considered at the time as one of the greatest hopefuls of new music in Berlin. But all of that changed with the onset of Nazism, which forced Rathaus to emigrate to the United States where he became a professor and a composer of film music whilst also working on other forms of music.Franco-Russian pianist Vladimir Stoupel now brings Rathaus out from the shadows, pairing him with some contemporary works by Shostakovich (Sonatas No. 1 & No. 2). He draws some interesting parallels between the four sonatas by these two composers whose lives were different but who both suffered persecution specific to their era.Rathaus composed his Sonata in C minor at the age of sixteen and it was still strongly influenced by a post-Romantic style, but this first attempt was highly acclaimed. Written seven years later, the Sonata, op. 20, of which this is the first recording in the world, is instead more in line with the work of Scriabin. Vladimir Stoupel interprets it as a snapshot of the 1920s and depicts the moods and turbulence of a volatile Berlin. Recorded at the WDR Radio in Cologne in 2013 and 2014, this is the very first time these recordings have been released. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 11 september 2020 | CAvi-music

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In no way can we say Herbert Schuch hasn’t given Pathétique an original structure. The German pianist pays particular attention to a lot of what made a young Beethoven, in his time, such a unique figure. Attention to articulations, attacks, keyboard registrations which gradually increase in size as well as the musician’s careful attention to harmonic balance, as can easily be heard on the development of Adagio cantabile, where Beethoven sprinkles some ascending motifs into the left hand. Nor is the final Rondo vain or flashy. Schuch truly keeps in mind the improvisational spirit of Mozart and Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Fantasies: a real sense of storytelling, as well as a theatrical knowledge and knack for surprise that bursts out alongside an even more acute exploration of the keyboard; a very “pianoforte” spirit and discipline that is all too rare today.Herbert Schuch continues his journey with two other sonatas from the Opus 31, Beethoven’s revolutionary and experimental opus (1801-1802). The final movement of the Sixteenth Sonata is the striking Rondo. Allegretto. Here, he joyfully and meticulously details all the motifs in double crochets that scatter the keyboard continually until they reach the most extreme registers. The crochets are a little prompt so as to facilitate the tempos needed to maintain a moderated allure. Herbert Schuch loosens the tension a little, unleashing with it a calm light, tinted with an intransigent determination onto the new keyboard cosmogony that is so typical with Beethovenian piano. Amazing. The Tempest is ethereal and features all the landmarks - such as the slightly arid section in this striking recital which has this ability to stimulate an incredible sense of questioning and sensitivity. With his all-out approach, Herbert Schuch proposes three extremely beautiful contemporary works which resonate perfectly with Beethoven, including the exciting Coups de Dés en Écho by Henri Pousseur (1929-2009)! © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Duo´s - Verschenen op 11 september 2020 | CAvi-music

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This recording took place in the Studio 2 of the Bayerischer Rundfunk in Munich, in February 2016. Dina Ugorskaja pursued the finishing process of the master with great impulse and unbelievable energy during a time when her health was abating. This project will stay simply as a singular milestone. Prokofiev and Shostakovich were ambivalent toward one another. Prokofiev accused Shostakovich of "devouring everything" (the fact that the younger composer dared to incorporate the street genres of entertainment music into his classical compositions) and affirmed that Shostakovich had no gift for melody. Shostakovich, for his part, occasionally found Prokofiev's music too crude, too clearly illustrative. Yet, in spite of the largely unfair criticism they directed toward one another, each one never let his counterpart entirely out of his sight, or, to be more exact, of his ears. Ever since the 1920s their music was featured on joint recital programmes. The young Shostakovich acknowledged Prokofiev's influence on certain of his own works. Prokofiev, when abroad, encouraged "chemical exchange between Russia and Europe" and promoted Shostakovich's works in particular, even expressing the wish that his younger colleague be allowed to perform abroad, too. Natalia Prishepenko and the late Dina Ugorskaja present stunningly personal and virtuosic performances of two of their violin sonatas. © CAvi-Music
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 11 september 2020 | CAvi-music

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The woodwind quintet is probably the only instrumental combination in chamber music that can claim to have been invented twice. The colourful combination of flute, oboe, clarinet, horn, and bassoon was quite popular in 18th-century noble courts, probably due to its refreshing sonority reminiscent of serenade music: composers felt inspired to write a great number of works. Swiss composer Richard Dubugnon's Frenglish Suite (1997) was inspired and influenced by several British and French composers. In the late 1800s, French flutist and composer Paul Taffanel devotedly started to create chamber music societies with the intention of reviving music of the past - an uncommon initiative in those times, and therefore much to his credit. British composer Gustav Holst's Late Romantic Quintet in A-flat major, Op. 14 is not as well known, but sheds light on other aspects of this instrumental combination: en lieu of virtuosity, it features a great variety of harmonies and timbres, similarly to what Taffanel had sought in his slow movement. Jean Françaix likewise possessed thorough knowledge of all five instruments and applied it specifically in his Quintet No. 1, with the goal of attaining a "high level of difficulty", as he remarked himself. Although Françaix wrote the piece in 1948, it was not until 1954 that five woodwind players of the Orchestre National in Paris drummed up the courage to perform the work in public after having reportedly "gone into confinement" for several months to practice it". © CAvi-Music
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Opera - Verschenen op 24 juli 2020 | CAvi-music

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Duo´s - Verschenen op 24 juli 2020 | CAvi-music

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When choosing the title of this album, the two performers were immediately drawn to the title of the first piece in our recording, Dhipli Zyia by Xenakis, which simply translates as ‘a band of two folk musicians’. After delving more deeply, they discovered that Zyia derives from the ancient Greek word ‘balance’, which is such a vitally important element of chamber music, and indeed – in any relationship. Fittingly, Zyia is also another name for Hera, the Goddess of marriage from ancient Greek mythology, and this album symbolises an important part of a journey for us – not only as partners in chamber music – but also as a celebration of our friendship… The recording centres around pieces which celebrate the joy and vibrancy of folk music, opening with music by Xenakis from the Balkans in Greece, Jonian’s birthplace, then venturing north to Hungary for the Kodály, west to Switzerland/France for the Sonatina by Honegger and finally returning to Greece for a rarely performed Duo by Skalkottas. © CAvi-Music
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Opera - Verschenen op 26 juni 2020 | CAvi-music

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Soundtrack - Verschenen op 26 juni 2020 | CAvi-music

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Opera - Verschenen op 29 mei 2020 | CAvi-music

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 29 mei 2020 | CAvi-music

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 22 mei 2020 | CAvi-music

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 22 mei 2020 | CAvi-music

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In a series of 3 albums, the Beethoven Trio Bonn explores the confrontation between one of Beethoven’s standard works for piano trio with a further “house music” arrangement of one of his orchestral works. More than providing an interesting pairing, the Beethoven Trio Bonn was keen on interpreting an original work for piano trio alongside an arrangement of an orchestral work “downsized” to piano trio format. This new concept delivers surprising, unforeseen results. Composers and publishers in Beethoven’s day sought to indulge the pleasures of the middle class: dozens of arrangements and transcriptions of orchestral works were in wide circulation for domestic use. Haydn, Mozart and many others had always tried to provide access to the wonders of symphonic music for those members of the population who could not gain entrance to the grand concerts of the upper classes. Up to the 1930s, music publishers continued to commission composers to arrange and transcribe symphonies and other orchestral works, in order to make them readily available as chamber music; no composer found the task too lowly, since such work was a good source of steady income. The very well-known Piano Trio No. 4 ("Gassenhauer") with his enormous witty playfulness (we listen to the version with the violin instead of the clarinet) and his three (!) movements is partnered with the Symphony No. 6, in an arrangement of the Brahms' friend Christian Gottlieb Belcke (1796-1875). Listening to it will be a big surprise, as the Sixth Symphony is a lovely flowing full body music piece with all the details not forgotten, wonderfully balanced with all its pastoral melodies. © CAvi-Music