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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 1 oktober 2021 | Accent

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 september 2021 | Accent

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This recording from the 2018 Göttingen Handel Festival presents two rarely heard works by Georg Friedrich Haendel: The Choice of Hercules and the Te Deum for the Victory of Dettingen. In The Choice of Hercules from 1751, Handel musically processes the mythical theme of Hercules at the crossroads, whereby Hercules' vacillation between virtue and lust is ideal for the back and forth in the search for the right path in life. The Dettingen Te Deum (HWV 283) is a cantata composed by Handel in 1743. On 27 June 1743, the British army and its allies under the command of King George II had defeated the French army at the Battle of Dettingen. Handel was commissioned to write a Te Deum "with timpani and trumpets" for the victory celebrations. Laurence Cummings, the Handel Festival Orchestra, outstanding soloists and the legendary Christ Church Cathedral Choir from Oxford provide this successful performance. © Accent
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 september 2021 | Accent

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The Thomaskantor position in Leipzig was one of the most important jobs for musicians in Germany in the 18th century. Several important musicians applied to succeed Johann Kuhnau after his death in 1722. In the recruitment process, the Leipzig city council was able to choose from the most famous personalities of the time. The first choice was Georg Philipp Telemann, who declined, however, after he had obtained a decent salary increase at his Hamburg post. The next two candidates were Johann Friedrich Fasch and Christoph Graupner - Fasch, knowing about Telemann's application, had accepted another position and Graupner would have become Thomaskantor, but his employer in Darmstadt would not let him go. Only the third choice, as is generally known, fell on Johann Sebastian Bach ... In his program "Leipzig 1723", Stefan Temmingh recalls this major moment in music history and presents recorder concertos by all four competitors. Excellently accompanied by the Capricornus Consort Basel, he thus creates a panopticon of recorder concertos by the greatest German masters of the time. © Accent
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 18 juni 2021 | Accent

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The bassoon was only able to establish itself as a solo instrument towards the end of the 17th century. The first virtuosos came from France, where the bassoon was used as a bass instrument in military orchestras and the outstanding bassoonists were also able to establish themselves in concert. The American bassoonist Danny Bond, who is active in many of Europe's leading early music ensembles, dedicated three albums, released on the Accent label between 1983 and 2000, to the French repertoire for solo bassoon. The first album highlights the French Baroque with works by Michel Corrette and Joseph Bodin de Boismortier, the other two albums present works by François Devienne and Etienne Ozi, who stand on the threshold from the Baroque to the Classical period. © Accent
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Koormuziek - Verschenen op 7 mei 2021 | Accent

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Around 1490, the painter Hans Memling created his "Concert of Angels". It consists of three paintings for the outside of an altar and shows God the Father surrounded by angels singing and playing instruments. What might the music have sounded like that inspired Memling to this painting? Very precisely, the painter depicted the instruments of his time, grouped into the "alta" and "bassa capella" typical of the period - the loud and the quiet instruments. Together with the Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten in Antwerp, where Memling's paintings hang today, Wim Beku initiated an interdisciplinary project in which the depicted instruments were recreated in detail by specialists in instrument making and research was carried out to find thematically appropriate music. The central theme of the original altar, of which only the Angel Concerto remains, was the Assumption of Mary, and so "Paradisi porte" – the door to paradise – also determines the music of this album. Gregorian music from liturgical books and polyphonic compositions from the time around 1500 in Bruges are heard, truly heavenly music played by Wim Becus "Otremontano Antwerpen" together with the singers of the Tiburtina Ensemble. © Accent
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 2 april 2021 | Accent

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The "Esterházy Music Collection" series with the Orfeo Orchestra conducted by György Vashegyi on the Accent label is dedicated to presenting musical treasures of the Esterházy family, many of which have been largely forgotten over the centuries. The recordings usually take place in the Apollo Hall of the Esterházy Palace in Fertod-Eszterháza, whose acoustics are among the best in the world. The present production is the third volume and offers a selection of earlier symphonies by Joseph Haydn. In addition to Symphonies Nos. 24, 42 and 43 from the years 1764 to 1771, No. 30, which already bore the epithet "Alleluja" on contemporary copies from 1765, is also heard. This is based on the use of the Gregorian "Alleluia" of the Easter liturgy in the main theme of the first movement. The symphony may have been composed for ecclesiastical use; a possible performance took place on Easter Sunday 1765. © Accent
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 5 februari 2021 | Accent

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The Viennese Court Kapellmeister Johann Joseph Fux (1660-1741) is regarded in music history as the forefather of modern counterpoint, and his instructional work Gradus ad parnassum continues to influence education in this subject to the present day. But the many compositions Fux wrote for the Viennese court are largely forgotten. If at all, one still knows of sacred compositions in which Fux followed this strict, academic style. On the other hand, the composer was able to free himself from this in his opera and in his componimenti sacri, which are operatic oratorios for Holy Week (during which no operas were allowed to be performed). Gunar Letzbor and his ensemble Ars Antiqua Austria present such a Fux's "componimento sacro": after 300 years the oratorio Gesu Cristo negato da Pietro was performed for the first time in January 2020, now it is also available on this album. At the centre of the plot is the biblical passion scene about Peter's denial of Christ, which is theologically examined in dramatic disputes between various allegorical figures. Fux translates this drama into his music, showing that he was not just a good counterpoint artist! © Accent
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 15 januari 2021 | Accent

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Sigiswald Kuijken's Bach cantata recordings, and in particular his complete series for Accent which culminated almost a decade ago now, haven't enjoyed quite the degree of international attention garnered by those of John Eliot Gardiner and Masaaki Suzuki with their own respective series, and this perhaps isn't completely surprising when Kuijken has consistently championed the one-voice-to-a-part approach. After all, even if one can get on board with one-to-a-part from a historical accuracy perspective, many find it a little harder to get on board with from a pleasure-listening angle, when the casualty of all that authenticity is textural variety – and indeed there's evidence that Bach himself was often frustrated by the slim vocal forces at his disposal. As ever, therefore, this three-strong, January-shaped return to the cantatas – for the third Sunday after Epiphany and the Sunday Septuagesima (the third Sunday before the start of Lent) - features one voice to a part, with La Petite Bande correspondingly chamber-forced. Also worth flagging up is that Kuijken has opted for a female rather than a male alto soloist. Inevitably therefore, the choruses lack the punch you'll hear from multi-voice offerings. However what you lose in weight, you gain in nimbleness, and the vocal performances here are all both enjoyable and text-aware. Likewise, the sound from La Petite Bande is sprightly, mostly attractive of tone, and with perhaps slightly less bite than heard from The English Baroque Soloists. The church acoustic meanwhile comes across with naturalness and a gentle bloom, and on the whole a good balance between parts, although the busy cello lines of BWV 92's Das Brausen von den rauhen Winden do rather cry out for a little more engineering love. If intimate, one-to-a-part Bach is of interest, this is certainly worth a listen. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | Accent

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The Mediterranean Sea has been the hub of resettlement and migration for centuries. After the fall of the Byzantine Empire, the people who settled in those areas that were depopulated by years of war, expulsion and flight. And in 1492, the Spanish Reconquista led to the expulsion of the Sephardic Jews, who brought their culture to many countries around the Mediterranean. Even today, the Mediterranean again plays an inglorious role in flight and expulsion. The German gambist Friederike Heumann has taken this as an opportunity to present, together with the Turkish singer Nihan Devecioglu and the Spanish guitarist Xavier Díaz-Latorre, the many ancient cultures around the Mediterranean: the tradition of the Sephardic people, songs from Lebanon, Turkey, Armenia and Greece, art music from Venice to Fado in Spain and Portugal, whose influences reach as far as South America. © Accent
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 2 oktober 2020 | Accent

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Gregor Joseph Werner (1693-1766) was Kapellmeister at the Eszterházy court in Eisenstadt, and on his death he was succeeded by Joseph Haydn. A surviving manuscript score of his oratorio Der gute Hirt is preserved in the music collection of the National Library of Hungary in Budapest. Werner’s oratorio is a “sepolcro” oratorio originating from the Viennese court tradition. This particular musical-dramatic form of the Holy Week oratorio performed around the holy sepulcher of Catholic churches, became fashionable throughout the Habsburg empire during the last third of the 17th century. This genre, a staged musical performance presenting the burial of Jesus Christ, was a part of church music practice in Central Europe as late as the 1730s. On 28 March 1739, the Good Friday service held in the Palace Chapel in Eisenstadt was centered around a musical drama setting of Gregor Werner’s own text based on the Parable of the Good Shepherd in the Gospel of Luke, thereby commemorating Jesus Christ’s death on the cross at Golgotha. The single lost sheep is the symbol of man who, having revolted and lost his secure place in Paradise, can be guided back to the path of salvation only through the sacrifice of the all-forgiving Good Shepherd/Jesus, the Father’s only son, who will never leave him. © Accent
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 18 september 2020 | Accent

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 juli 2020 | Accent

This album, recorded in 1988, is a sonic representation of Watteau’s Pilgrimage to Cythera (a variant of The Embarkation for Cythera which you can see at the Louvre), owned by the Prussian king Frederic The Great, an avid painter. What better to illustrate the works of Johann Philipp Kirnberger, a violinist, choirmaster and musical advisor to the court of the flautist king? Trusting in the consistency of tradition, we can assume that Kirnberger was Johann Sebastian Bach’s student in Leipzig. Other than the Sonatas For Flute that we find here, which he wrote for his royal employer, Kirnberger is known among musicians for his various uneven temperaments that he composed and which are used today by historically informed performers. Such is the case for the Belgian flautist Frank Theuns, founder of the Les Buffardins ensemble (2007) with whom he has tirelessly recorded the 18th century flute repertoire (Haendel, Sammartini, Kirnberger, Quantz, Hotteterre, Montéclair, Boismortier, Blavet) for Accent (label). In this early recording, Frank Theuns plays on a modern copy of a Belgian traverso from around 1720. He is joined by harpsichordist Ewald Demeyere playing on a copy of a 1778 instrument and by Richte van der Meer using a baroque cello by a Parisian luthier from 1720. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 juli 2020 | Accent

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David returns from the battle bearing the head of the giant Goliath – as a reward, King Saul promises him the hand of his horrified daughter Merab. But when David receives more popular acclaim than the King, Saul is consumed by jealousy. His daughter Michal advises David to soothe the incensed monarch with the calming strains of a harp. But Saul’s rage is merely exacerbated, and he finally casts a spear at David. When he misses, Saul orders his son Jonathan to slay David... When setting this Old Testament material to music in 1738, Georg Friedrich Haendel worked together for the first time with the librettist Charles Jennens, who later on, for example, put together the text for the Messiah. The work was premiered on 16 January 1739 in the King’s Theatre at the Haymarket in London. © Accent
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 3 juli 2020 | Accent

Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Opera - Verschenen op 3 juli 2020 | Accent

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Opera - Verschenen op 3 juli 2020 | Accent

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Koormuziek - Verschenen op 3 juli 2020 | Accent

The Benedictine abbey at Lambach in Upper Austria was founded in 1056. Research undertaken since 2002 has revealed a treasure trove of musical works written by musicians associated with the abbey. Two such composers are featured on this recording (previously released on the Symphonia label in 2006), which was recorded in the historic building itself: Beniamin Ludwig Ramhaufski (c 1631-1694) and the Salzburgborn Joseph Balthasar Hochreither (1669-1731), who perhaps studied with Biber. Hochreither's Missa ad multos annos was first performed at Lambach for the consecration of a new Abbot in 1705. The choral and instrumental elements are much like the older composer's style but the overall flow of the music is more imaginative in dramatic wordsetting, and the passages for soloists and consort are in a more elegant and expressive style. Ramhaufski's Mass a 23 is a finely crafted work that in no way suffers from comparison with Biber. “Ars Antiqua Austria play with commendable articulation and shapeliness, and the contributions from trumpets and trombones are particularly excellent. The small vocal force of St Florianer Sängerknaben, assisted by a few adult soloists, is very good indeed: consort passages possess attractive clarity and the fuller choral sections swell with the perfect amount of resonance.” (Gramophone)
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 19 juni 2020 | Accent

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Composed in 1761, the year Joseph Haydn became the court musician for the Esterházy Family (with whom he stayed for more than thirty years), Symphonies No. 6, 7 and 8 form a unique trilogy in the history of music and are, according to musicologist Marc Vignal, Haydn's first masterpieces in this field and probably even for symphonies in general. Haydn put all his theory and know-how into the compositions, at a time when he was still being tested by the Prince, having to meet overwhelming specifications that would give any musician today nightmares. In these three gems of concise, virtuosic composing, Haydn distributes solos to all the musicians of the orchestra, including the double bass and bassoon, instruments which were not accustomed to this kind of exercise. It is a fiesta of sonic garlands, as found in the ancient baroque "concerto grosso", alternating with dark, deeply moving passages. The subtitles, the only ones Haydn himself gave to his symphonies, "Le Matin", "Le Midi", "Le Soir", were suggested and even commissioned by Prince Paul Anton to describe an allegory of the "Hours of the Day" and, above all, the three stages of life. Recorded in 2019 in the splendid Apollo Hall of Eszterháza Castle in Fertöd, where Haydn wrote many symphonies (though not these ones), this recording by the Orfeo Orchestra of Budapest - not to be confused with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra - conducted by György Vashegyi obviously has an undeniably authentic feel. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 22 mei 2020 | Accent

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With Il trionfo della morte by Bonaventuro Aliotti from 1677, the French ensemble Les Traversées Baroques presents an important example of an early oratorio. The form of the oratorio developed after the Catholic Church in the Council of Trent (1545-1563) severely restricted the use of music in church services. Some religious congregations then began to perform new forms of music in their prayer and assembly rooms, the "oratorios". An important centre for the development of the oratorio or "Dialoghi sacri", as this musical form of theological approach was called, was Sicily. There Bunaventuro Aliotti grew up and entered the Franciscan Minorite Order, where he received extensive training as organist and conductor. Aliotti created a total of eleven oratorios, but only four of them have survived. Il trionfo della morte revolves around the story of Adam and Eve, who are confronted with temptation, but also with their passion, their torments and their doubts. Aliotti characterises his characters with great inspiration, and the orchestra comments and underlines the plot with short interjections in a varied and colourful way. © Accent
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 22 mei 2020 | Accent

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Margret Köll is one of the most important interpreters of the historical harp. On her new album she dedicates herself to the “single pedal harp”, which was developed at the beginning of the 18th century. By using pedals, the player now had the possibility to change the pitches of the strings by a half-tone, and in this way was able to play more complicated harmonies and chromatic melodies. In 1728 such a harp was presented to Emperor Charles VI and under the rage of his daughter Empress Maria Theresa (since 1740) this instrument conquered the hearts of Vienna and other European centres. On the basis of works by Wagenseil, Krumpholtz, Joseph Haydn and Gluck, Margret Köll shows how this instrument conquered the Viennese salons: as a soloist, as a popular accompanying instrument, as an equal-ranking chamber music partner or as a solo instrument with string accompaniment. A very colorful program around the harp of the early and high Viennese classical period. © Accent