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Rock - Verschenen op 9 oktober 2020 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Music
Addition by subtraction? A punk band selling out? Audio distortion as an artistic principal? The sound of a boom box cranked up? Where's Bob? The Replacements' Pleased to Meet Me continues to answer all these questions and more. In 1986, like a snake shedding its skin, the Minneapolis foursome parted ways with guitarist Bob Stinson, leaving a trio of his younger brother Tommy on bass, drummer Chris Mars and singer/guitarist Paul Westerberg. Westerberg's poppier, more intimate songs and growing ambitions for success immediately began to transform the band. For their fifth album the threesome ended up at Memphis' Ardent Studios in the capable hands of Jim Dickinson, the producer of Big Star's Third, the pianist heard on The Stones' "Wild Horses," and a collaborator with Bob Dylan and Ry Cooder. Described in the liner notes by friends as a "Southern mad scientist," Dickinson engaged in a psychodrama-mind meld with the band and the result was an album that both band and producer would forever after be known for. Because record labels have come to realize that extras are needed for reissues to succeed, two ideas predominate: demos to show how songs were shaped and unreleased concert material to show how the material matured when played live. First reissued with extra tracks in 2008, Rhino's new Pleased to Meet Me reissue is a deep dive into how the tunes evolved from early demos, through rough mixes, outtakes, alternates and tracks that appeared only as singles to a 2020 remaster of the original album. Of the 55 tracks in this reissue, 29 have never been released before. The early demos from Blackberry Way Studios in Minneapolis—which contain Bob Stinson's last recordings with the band—show that the material had structure and rudimentary arrangements before Memphis. The rough mixes of tunes like "Alex Chilton" by Ardent's John Hampton, have a clattery, spacious ambiance and show how much tightening had yet to be done. Of the rough mixes, "Can't Hardly Wait" is a tick slower than the issued take and Dickinson's rollicking piano part on raucous opener "IOU" is lifted up in the mix. An early digital recording which made extensive use of a Fairlight sampler, the sound of Pleased to Meet Me has always been aggressive and embellished, tarted up with touches like the broken glass in "Shooting Dirty Pool," the opening distortion of "Red Red Wine," and Chris and Tommy's opening laughter, their zombie Greek chorus and the mid tune sax growl in "I Don't Know." The oddball lounge jazz of "Nightclub Jitters" is appropriately atmospheric and cool while the "The Ledge," the album's chosen single has the requisite "big" sound which was then attractive to alternative radio and MTV. Visceral but melodic, tender but defiant, as fierce a rock record now as it was the day it was released, Pleased to Meet Me, still epitomizes what producer Dickinson calls in the liner notes, "recording the feeling in your soul while you're playing." © Robert Baird/Qobuz
HI-RES€ 55,99
CD€ 48,99

Rock - Verschenen op 27 september 2019 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Best New Reissue
Thirty years later, Paul Westerberg and the rest of The Replacements are having another shot at getting their sixth album right on Don’t Tell A Soul Redux. The revamp is part of a new box set, Dead Man's Pop, which also contains a live show and other rare goodies, including additional tracks from a session with Tom Waits and earlier, scrapped tracks recorded at Bearsville Studios. For the Redux mix, Matt Wallace, who originally co-produced Don't Tell a Soul along with the band, used a mix recorded during the 1988 Paisley Park sessions as source material. As might be expected, the polarizing late-'80s gloss is gone, replaced by a clearer, lively sonic approach with plenty of nuance: Acoustic guitars are more prominent throughout, and individual parts within songs (a blazing guitar line here, a crashing piano part there) are evident. This clarity also revealed that Don't Tell a Soul continued to build on Pleased To Meet Me's diversity; songs encompass a whimsical soul-pop shuffle ("Asking Me Lies"), an R.E.M.-esque anthem ("Darlin' One" and its towering, droning guitars) and swaggering Americana ("We'll Inherit the Earth"). In perhaps the boldest move of all, Don't Tell a Soul's tracklisting is completely shuffled around on the new version, with only leadoff track "Talent Show" and "We'll Inherit the Earth" in slot three maintaining their original positions. This sequencing tweak is brilliant, as the album now boasts a poignant emotional arc that starts with anxiety over band and career matters and ends with piercing personal confessions. © Annie Zaleski / Qobuz
CD€ 16,99

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 22 september 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

Onderscheidingen De Muzikale Rariteiten
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 2 oktober 1984 | Ryko - Rhino

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
CD€ 17,49

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 22 april 2008 | Ryko - Rhino

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
CD€ 17,49

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 6 oktober 2017 | Rhino - Warner Records

Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
The Replacements were an essential American rock ‘n’ roll band that saved the eighties without really ever making it big in Europe. Carried by one of the most gifted songwriters of his generation—the great Paul Westerberg, unsurprisingly cherished in his homeland—helped in his task by a group of vigorous musicians each one wackier than the last (Tommy Stinson on bass, his brother Bob - who died in 1995 - on guitar and Chris Mars on drums), the Mats (as their fans always called them) offered then a viscerally punk version of rock à la Rolling Stones. Sometimes basic though always impeccably written and whose art is presented here live on the small Maxwell’s stage in Hoboken, facing Manhattan. A previously unheard crackdown concert from February 1986, when the Mats had already released Sorry Ma, Forgot To Take Out The Trash (1981), Stink (1982), Hootenanny (1983), Let It Be (1984) and Tim (1985), and were on the verge of releasing Pleased To Meet Me the next year. © MZ/Qobuz  
CD€ 17,49

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 22 september 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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CD€ 17,49

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 23 september 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 11 oktober 2010 | Warner Records

CD€ 17,49

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 22 september 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

CD€ 13,99

Rock - Verschenen op 3 maart 1987 | Sire

CD€ 13,99

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 21 september 1990 | Sire

CD€ 13,99

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 29 april 1983 | Ryko - Rhino

CD€ 17,49

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 23 september 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

CD€ 13,99

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 27 januari 1989 | Sire

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 22 april 2008 | Ryko - Rhino

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CD€ 2,29

Rock - Verschenen op 16 juli 2020 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res
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Rock - Verschenen op 25 augustus 1981 | Ryko - Rhino

CD€ 13,99
Tim

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 16 oktober 1985 | Sire

CD€ 2,29

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 16 september 2017 | Rhino - Warner Records