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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 4 december 2020 | KRUNK

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Christmas came early for Sigur Rós fans. After the second solo album by singer/guitarist Jónsi, Shiver, released in October 2020, the Icelanders now deliver a piece that has been almost twenty years in the making, a live performance of Odin's Raven Magic, an oratorio that has attained cult status, first performed in 2002 at London's Barbican Centre by Sigur Rós, MAO pioneer Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson aka HÖH, the singer of rimur (traditional Icelandic poems) Steindór Andersen, accompanied by the Schola Cantorum in Reykjavik and the London Sinfonietta. Almost two decades later, Sigur Ros offers a veritable all-star game of Icelandic music, with the version recorded on 28 and 29 September 2004 in Paris at La Grande Halle de la Villette in the company of the Orchestre des Lauréats du Conservatoire national de Paris and the Schola Cantorum in Reykjavik, with arrangements by Kjartan Sveinsson (Sigur Rós's pianist from 1998 to 2013) and Maria Huld Markan Sigfúsdóttir, from the Reykjavik indie pop group Amiina, as well as the stone marimba built specially for the occasion by Páll Guðmundsson. All this help was certainly needed for this audiovisual show based on a 500-year-old Icelandic poem that tells of the banquet of the gods in Valhalla, held as signs appear announcing the end of the world. An hour of grandiose music on a legendary theme with a new object of worship for Sigur Rós followers. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 5 juli 2019 | KRUNK

Rock? New Age? Post-rock? Trippy? Progressive? Psychedelic on Xanax? Or something even more alien? Sigur Ros’ second album has retained the same extra-terrestrial quality since its release in June 1999. Like with shoegaze, layer after layer of the Reykjavík collective’s light electro creates a unique hypnotizing effect, similar to the echoes featured in Brian Eno’s work. But under the guise of an experiment lab for the mad scientist, Agætis byrjun ("a good beginning" in English) marries real songs with solid harmonic constructions. Whether it’s the impressive falsetto and heady chorus of Svefn-g-englar, the refined violins of Staralfur or the faux-jazz with a touch of trip-hop in Hjartao Hamast, Sigur Ros’ magnum opus is just one gorgeous idea after the next. This 20th anniversary edition celebrates the shock to the senses that this album truly is; in addition to the remastered album, it includes a 1999 live performance at the Islenska Operan as well as a number of demos. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 12 juni 1999 | KRUNK

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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 13 september 2005 | Parlophone UK

A strange thing happens before the two-minute mark in "Saeglopur." All the twinkling and cooing erupts, at what might seem like eight minutes earlier than normal, into a cathartic blast of tautly constructed group noise -- or, as those who prefer songs and motion over moods and atmospheres might say, "The good part comes." "Saeglopur" is emblematic of Sigur Rós' fourth album, released nearly three years (!) after ( ). Nothing resembles a drone, and no part of it could be described as funereal. Even so, Takk... is still very much a Sigur Rós album, due in large part to the ever-present otherworldly vocals, but also because the only real changes are the activeness of some arrangements -- arrangements that deploy a familiar combination of bass, drums, piano, vocals, lots of strings, and some horns -- and some of the colors that are used. Despite opening with what sounds like a happy walk through a snow bank, the album is just as suited for a sunlit spring morning as ( ) was suited for a winter trudge across a foggy moor, so in that sense, it isn't a repeat and is more tactile than illusory, but it's not likely to win over anyone who suddenly felt an index finger push against the back of his throat while hearing "Svefn-G-Englar" for the first time. And it's not as if the band is suddenly writing three-minute pop songs, either. Half of the album's tracks are longer than six minutes, with extended cresting, sudden bursts of action, and a couple particularly fragile moments that seem to be on the brink of melting away. One thing to consider when wondering whether or not this band has changed in any way: they've gone from providing the background music to death announcements to "Sé Lest," a fluttering children's lullaby that is briefly crashed by an even more gleeful oom-pah-pah brass band. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 28 oktober 2002 | KRUNK

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Rock - Verschenen op 5 november 2007 | Parlophone UK

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Ambient - Verschenen op 9 augustus 2019 | KRUNK

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 28 mei 2012 | Parlophone UK

Valtari (‘Stoomwals’) is het zesde studioalbum van de zweverige IJslandse post-rockers, en volgt hun 2011 live cd/dvd set Inni op. Naar verluidt het eindproduct van een langdurige en moeilijke geboorte , omschrijft de band het als “elektronischer” dan vorige albums. De single "Ekki Múkk" staat er op, waarop de band terugkeert naar het epische, aanhoudende, hartverscheurend mooie geluid van hun doorbraakalbums. © TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 7 november 2011 | KRUNK

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 7 juni 2013 | KRUNK

Zelf noemen de muzikanten van de IJslandse formatie Sigur Rós hun nieuwe album Kveikur (2013) agressiever dan hun eerdere platen. Feit is dat de songs op het zevende studioalbum van de groep uit Reykjavík directer en ritmischer klinken dan voorheen. Niet dat Kveikur daarmee een radiovriendelijk album is geworden. Want de band rond zanger Jónsi Birgisson brengt nog steeds licht vervreemdende post-rock, die de luisteraar van begin tot eind uitdaagt. De plaat biedt complexe klanklandschappen, die soms wonderschoon maar even vaak verontrustend aandoen. © TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 20 juni 2008 | Parlophone UK

Booklet
With their fifth full-length album, Med Sud I Eyrum Vid Spilum Endalaust (translated as With a Buzz in Our Ears We Play Endlessly), Sigur Rós have taken the poppy, sunshiny leanings of their previous album a step further into the light. The band has always been known for otherworldly soundscapes, and while there is enough of that here to keep the faithful happy, the band also writes straightforward, three-minute pop songs like the incredible catchy, sticky-sweet duo ("Gobbldigook," "Inní Mér Syngur Vitleysingur") that kick the album off like the first rays of the morning sun blazing through your bedroom window. That feeling continues on through the album as both the joyously soaring vocals and the buoyant melodies keep things floating happily on air. The arrangement of sound is quite different from previous albums, too. In the past their sound was characterized by a great wash of instruments merging together into great, gently heaving walls and waves of sound; on this album, for the most part, you can pick out individual instruments whether it's the acoustic guitar that underpins many of the songs (and provides the main backing on the intimate and quite lovely, and quite un-Sigur Rós-like, "Illgresi") or the lone piano that begins "Ára Bátur" (which does expand out into an epic undertaking with over 90 people including the London Sinfonietta and London Oratory Boy's Choir eventually playing on the track). Despite the few tracks that reach for the heavens, for the first time the band sounds grounded and stripped down. Songs like "Festival," with its pounding bassline and charging drums, and the melancholy album closer, "All Alright," which is based on a lonely piano figure (and features lyrics sung in English for the first time in the group's history), are firmly tethered to earth and shorn of excess artifice. In the past it was easy to be impressed with the sound of Sigur Rós, to be carried away by the grandeur of the band and be hit hard by the titanic emotions. On Med Sud I Eyrum Vid Spilum Endalaust you can really hear the human hearts behind the wall of sound, and while the emotional impact is on a smaller scale, somehow it is even more affecting. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 13 september 2005 | Parlophone UK

A strange thing happens before the two-minute mark in "Saeglopur." All the twinkling and cooing erupts, at what might seem like eight minutes earlier than normal, into a cathartic blast of tautly constructed group noise -- or, as those who prefer songs and motion over moods and atmospheres might say, "The good part comes." "Saeglopur" is emblematic of Sigur Rós' fourth album, released nearly three years (!) after ( ). Nothing resembles a drone, and no part of it could be described as funereal. Even so, Takk... is still very much a Sigur Rós album, due in large part to the ever-present otherworldly vocals, but also because the only real changes are the activeness of some arrangements -- arrangements that deploy a familiar combination of bass, drums, piano, vocals, lots of strings, and some horns -- and some of the colors that are used. Despite opening with what sounds like a happy walk through a snow bank, the album is just as suited for a sunlit spring morning as ( ) was suited for a winter trudge across a foggy moor, so in that sense, it isn't a repeat and is more tactile than illusory, but it's not likely to win over anyone who suddenly felt an index finger push against the back of his throat while hearing "Svefn-G-Englar" for the first time. And it's not as if the band is suddenly writing three-minute pop songs, either. Half of the album's tracks are longer than six minutes, with extended cresting, sudden bursts of action, and a couple particularly fragile moments that seem to be on the brink of melting away. One thing to consider when wondering whether or not this band has changed in any way: they've gone from providing the background music to death announcements to "Sé Lest," a fluttering children's lullaby that is briefly crashed by an even more gleeful oom-pah-pah brass band. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 30 april 2013 | Vitamin Records

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Ambient - Verschenen op 21 juni 2016 | KRUNK

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 28 mei 2012 | Parlophone UK

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Valtari (‘Stoomwals’) is het zesde studioalbum van de zweverige IJslandse post-rockers, en volgt hun 2011 live cd/dvd set Inni op. Naar verluidt het eindproduct van een langdurige en moeilijke geboorte , omschrijft de band het als “elektronischer” dan vorige albums. De single "Ekki Múkk" staat er op, waarop de band terugkeert naar het epische, aanhoudende, hartverscheurend mooie geluid van hun doorbraakalbums. © TiVo
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Electronic - Verschenen op 14 juni 1997 | KRUNK

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Rock - Verschenen op 5 september 2008 | Parlophone UK

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 20 augustus 2007 | KRUNK

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Electronic - Verschenen op 19 juni 2016 | KRUNK

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Tv-series - Verschenen op 9 mei 2014 | Sony Classical

Artiest

Sigur Rós in het magazine