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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 15 mei 1986 | Arista

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 22 oktober 2010 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 1 januari 2002 | Arista

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 27 maart 1984 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 12 april 2003 | Arista

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 1 januari 1985 | Arista

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Take the title of Run-D.M.C.'s King of Rock somewhat literally. True, the trailblazing rap crew hardly abandoned hip-hop on their second album, but they did follow through on the blueprint of their debut, emphasizing the rock leanings that formed the subtext of Run-D.M.C. Nearly every cut surges forward on thundering drum machines and simple power chords, with the tempos picked up a notch and the production hitting like a punch to the stomach. If the debut suggested hard rock, this feels like hard rock -- over-amplified, brutal, and intoxicating in its sheer sonic force. What really makes King of Rock work is that it sounds tougher and is smarter than almost all of the rock and metal records of its time. There is an urgency to the music unheard in the hard rock of the '80s -- a sense of inevitability to the riffs and rhythms, balanced by the justified boasting of Run and D.M.C. Most of their rhymes are devoted to party jams or bragging, but nobody was sharper, funnier, or as clever as this duo, nor was there a DJ better than Jam Master Jay, who not just forms the backbone of their music, but also has two great showcases in "Jam-Master Jammin'" and "Darryl and Joe" (the latter one of two exceptions to the rock rules of the album, the other being the genre-pushing "Roots, Rap, Reggae," one of the first rap tracks to make explicit the links between hip-hop and reggae). Even if there a pronounced rock influence throughout King of Rock, what makes it so remarkable is that it never sounds like a concession in order to win a larger audience. No matter how many metallic guitar riffs are on the record, this music is as raw and street-level as the debut. It manages to be just as dynamic, exciting, and timeless as that album, as it expands the definition of what both Run-D.M.C. and rap could do. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 5 mei 2007 | SONY BMG Catalog

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 30 oktober 2012 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 10 september 2002 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 17 mei 1988 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 16 oktober 1990 | Arista

Longevity isn't a realistic goal for most rappers, who are lucky if they aren't considered played out by their third or fourth album. By 1990, Run-D.M.C.'s popularity had decreased dramatically, and the Queens residents had lost a lot of ground to both West Coast gangster rappers like Ice Cube, Ice-T and Compton's Most Wanted. With its fifth album, Back From Hell, Run-D.M.C. set out to regain the support of the hardcore rap audience and pretty much abandoned rock-influenced material in favor of stripped-down, minimalist and consistently street-oriented sounds. Not outstanding but certainly enjoyable, such gritty reflections on urban life as "Livin' in the City," "The Ave." and "Faces" made it clear that Run-D.M.C. was still well worth hearing. [Back From Hell was remastered and reissued in 1999.] © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 26 april 2021 | The Band Aid Trust

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 15 mei 1986 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 27 maart 1984 | Arista

Years after the release of Run-D.M.C.'s eponymous 1984 debut, the group generally was acknowledged to be hip-hop's Beatles -- a sentiment that makes a lot of sense, even if Run-D.M.C. isn't quite the equivalent of a rap Please Please Me. Run-D.M.C. were the Beatles of rap because they signaled a cultural and musical change for the music, ushering it into its accepted form; neither group originated the music, but they gave it the shape known today. But, no matter how true and useful the comparison is, it is also a little misleading, because it implies that Run-D.M.C. also were a melodic, accessible group, bringing in elements from all different strands of popular music. No, Run-D.M.C.'s expanded their music by making it tough and spare, primarily by adapting the sound and attitude of hard rock to hip-hop. Prior to this, rap felt like a block party -- the beats were funky and elastic, all about the groove. Run-D.M.C. hit hard. The production is tough and minimal, built on relentless drum machines and Jam Master Jay's furious scratching, mixing in a guitar riff or a keyboard hit on occasion. It is brutal urban music, and Run and D.M.C.'s forceful, muscular rhymes match the music. Where other MCs sounded cheerful, Run and D.M.C. prowl and taunt the listener, sounding as if they were a street gang. And while much of the record is devoted to braggadocio, boasting, and block parties, Run-D.M.C. also addressed grittier realities of urban life, giving this record both context and thematic weight. All of this -- the music, the attitude, the words, the themes -- marked a turning point for rap, and it's impossible to calculate Run-D.M.C.'s influence on all that came afterward. Years later, some of the production may sound a bit of its time, but the music itself does not because music this powerful and original always retains its impact and force as music. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 4 mei 1993 | Arista

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Pop - Verschenen op 26 maart 2009 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 31 mei 2019 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 31 mei 2019 | Arista - Legacy

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 16 september 1988 | Arista

At the end of 1986, Raising Hell was rap's best-selling album up to that point, though it would soon be outsold by the Beastie Boys' Licensed to Ill. Profile Records hoped that Run-D.M.C.'s fourth album, Tougher Than Leather, would exceed the Beastie Boys' quintuple-platinum status, but unfortunately, the group's popularity had decreased by 1988. One of Run-D.M.C.'s strong points -- its love of rock & roll -- was also its undoing in hip-hop circles. Any type of crossover success tends to be viewed suspiciously in the hood, and hardcore hip-hoppers weren't overly receptive to "Miss Elaine," "Papa Crazy," "Mary, Mary," and other rap-rock delights found on the album. Thanks largely to rock fans, this album did go platinum for sales exceeding one million copies -- which ironically, Profile considered a disappointment. But the fact is that while Tougher Than Leather isn't quite as strong as Run-D.M.C.'s first three albums, it was one of 1988's best rap releases. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 3 april 2001 | Arista