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Pop - Verschenen op 5 maart 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 17 november 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 18 mei 1971 | Mercury Records

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Without greatly altering his approach, Rod Stewart perfected his blend of hard rock, folk, and blues on his masterpiece, Every Picture Tells a Story. Marginally a harder-rocking album than Gasoline Alley -- the Faces blister on the Temptations cover "(I Know I'm) Losing You," and the acoustic title track goes into hyper-drive with Mick Waller's primitive drumming -- the great triumph of Every Picture Tells a Story lies in its content. Every song on the album, whether it's a cover or original, is a gem, combining to form a romantic, earthy portrait of a young man joyously celebrating his young life. Of course, "Maggie May" -- the ornate, ringing ode about a seduction from an older woman -- is the centerpiece, but each song, whether it's the devilishly witty title track or the unbearably poignant "Mandolin Wind," has the same appeal. And the covers, including definitive readings of Bob Dylan's "Tomorrow Is Such a Long Time" and Tim Hardin's "Reason to Believe," as well as a rollicking "That's All Right," are equally terrific, bringing new dimension to the songs. It's a beautiful album, one that has the timeless qualities of the best folk, yet one that rocks harder than most pop music -- few rock albums are quite this powerful or this rich. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 22 november 2019 | Rhino

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Pop - Verschenen op 4 juni 2021 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 6 maart 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 1 februari 2011 | J Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1972 | Mercury Records

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Essentially a harder-rocking reprise of Every Picture Tells a Story, Never a Dull Moment never quite reaches the heights of its predecessor, but it's a wonderful, multi-faceted record in its own right. Opening with the touching, autobiographical rocker "True Blue," which finds Rod Stewart trying to come to grips with his newfound stardom but concluding that he'd "rather be back home," the record is the last of Stewart's series of epic fusions of hard rock and folk. It's possible to hear Stewart go for superstardom with the hard-rocking kick and fat electric guitars of the album, but the songs still cut to the core. "You Wear It Well" is a "Maggie May" rewrite on the surface, but it develops into a touching song about being emotionally inarticulate. Similarly, "Lost Paraguayos" is funny, driving folk-rock, and it's hard not to be swept away when the Stonesy hard rocker "Italian Girls" soars into a mandolin-driven coda. The covers -- whether a soulful reading of Jimi Hendrix's "Angel," an empathetic version of Dylan's "Mama, You Been on My Mind," or a stunning interpretation of Etta James' "I'd Rather Go Blind" -- are equally effective, making Never a Dull Moment a masterful record. He never got quite this good ever again. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 juni 1970 | Mercury Records

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Gasoline Alley follows the same formula of Rod Stewart's first album, intercutting contemporary covers with slightly older rock & roll and folk classics and originals written in the same vein. The difference is in execution. Stewart sounds more confident, claiming Elton John's "Country Comfort," the Small Faces' "My Way of Giving," and the Rolling Stones' version of "It's All Over Now" with a ragged, laddish charm. Like its predecessor, nearly all of Gasoline Alley is played on acoustic instruments -- Stewart treats rock & roll songs like folk songs, reinterpreting them in individual, unpredictable ways. For instance, "It's All Over Now" becomes a shambling, loose-limbed ramble instead of a tight R&B/blues groove, and "Cut Across Shorty" is based around a howling, Mideastern violin instead of a rockabilly riff. Of course, being a rocker at heart, Stewart doesn't let these songs become limp acoustic numbers -- these rock harder than any fuzz-guitar workout. The drums crash and bang, the acoustic guitars are pounded with a vengeance -- it's a wild, careening sound that is positively joyous with its abandon. And on the slow songs, Stewart is nuanced and affecting -- his interpretation of Bob Dylan's "Only a Hobo" is one of the finest Dylan covers, while the original title track is a vivid, loving tribute to his adolescence. And that spirit is carried throughout Gasoline Alley. It's an album that celebrates tradition while moving it into the present and never once does it disown the past. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 13 augustus 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 14 november 2008 | Rhino

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Pop - Verschenen op 17 november 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Ambient / New Age / Easy Listening - Verschenen op 12 november 2012 | Verve

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Vijf decennia lang weerstond Rod Stewart de verleiding om een kerstplaat uit te brengen. Tot hij in 2012 Merry Christmas, Baby uitbracht, een opgewekte collectie seculiere kerstliedjes. Omgeven door zachtaardige big band-klanken luisteren de songs opvallend makkelijk weg. Merry Christmas, Baby sluit naadloos aan op Stewarts Great American Songbook-serie. Want op het kerstalbum wijkt Stewart nauwelijks af van de aanpak die hij toepast op zijn Great American Songbook-platen, terwijl producer David Foster een deken van zachte, geruststellende geluiden over de songs legt. Het album staat ver af van de Stewart uit de jaren zeventig en laat vooral een Stewart in de rol van crooner horen. Daarmee past de cd uitstekend in de kerstsfeer. © TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 22 maart 2011 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 8 oktober 2002 | J Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 17 november 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 17 november 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 9 juli 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 12 november 1996 | Warner Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 18 mei 1971 | Mercury Records

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Without greatly altering his approach, Rod Stewart perfected his blend of hard rock, folk, and blues on his masterpiece, Every Picture Tells a Story. Marginally a harder-rocking album than Gasoline Alley -- the Faces blister on the Temptations cover "(I Know I'm) Losing You," and the acoustic title track goes into hyper-drive with Mick Waller's primitive drumming -- the great triumph of Every Picture Tells a Story lies in its content. Every song on the album, whether it's a cover or original, is a gem, combining to form a romantic, earthy portrait of a young man joyously celebrating his young life. Of course, "Maggie May" -- the ornate, ringing ode about a seduction from an older woman -- is the centerpiece, but each song, whether it's the devilishly witty title track or the unbearably poignant "Mandolin Wind," has the same appeal. And the covers, including definitive readings of Bob Dylan's "Tomorrow Is Such a Long Time" and Tim Hardin's "Reason to Believe," as well as a rollicking "That's All Right," are equally terrific, bringing new dimension to the songs. It's a beautiful album, one that has the timeless qualities of the best folk, yet one that rocks harder than most pop music -- few rock albums are quite this powerful or this rich. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo