Your basket is empty

Categories :

Vergelijkbare artiesten

Albums

From
HI-RES€ 17,49
CD€ 12,49

Pop - Verschenen op 1 september 2014 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
Op het verzamelalbum All-Time Greatest Hits uit 2014 zijn alle grote hits van de Amerikaanse singer-songwriter Neil Diamond (1941) bij elkaar gebracht. Wie hits als "Song Sung Blue", "Sweet Caroline", "I'm a Believer" en "America" graag op een album bij elkaar heeft, zal aan dit album veel plezier beleven. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 58,49
CD€ 41,99

Pop - Verschenen op 30 november 2018 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€ 21,49
CD€ 14,99

Pop - Verschenen op 20 november 2020 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res
Although a 2018 Parkinson's Disease diagnosis effectively ended Neil Diamond's touring career, the songwriting legend has no plans to stop making music. Recorded between London's historic Abbey Road Studios and the singer's own Los Angeles studio, Classic Diamonds is equal parts retrospective and reinterpretation as he revisits 14 of his best known songs with assistance from the London Symphony Orchestra. Playing with an orchestra is nothing new for Diamond; brass and strings have been a defining characteristic of his music since the late 1960s, both on-stage and in the studio. To that end, it's almost surprising that a symphonic reimagining of his hits doesn't already exist. Still, with a catalog as deep as Diamond's, it's hard to fault him for playing to his strengths and at 79, he still brings a remarkable amount of emotion and an easy warmth to the experience. Forgoing his usual band, Classic Diamonds aims for a classy vibe, relying mostly on piano and orchestra to reframe songs like "Beautiful Noise" and "Song Sung Blue," neither of which resemble their original arrangements. A sweeping overture and deconstructed chord changes breathe new life into the former, while the latter is extended with a newly written intro containing extra lyrics. Produced by Walter Afanasieff who also co-arranged with conductor William Ross, it's nice to hear Diamond and his collaborators taking liberties with the material, even if not all of them land. Altering the perky pop classic "I'm a Believer" into a wistful ballad serves up a little too much corn, as does his impassioned reading of Emma Lazarus' famous sonnet ("Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses…") to kick off the rousing immigration anthem "America," though the latter is certainly on-brand for Diamond's style of earnest showmanship. On the other hand, the sudden appearance of a sitar and exultant choir adds an interesting twist and makes for a bombastic and surprisingly moving version of "Holly Holy." On the whole, Classic Diamonds feels like somewhat of an unnecessary exercise given the already-lush nature of Diamond's work, but his performances are uniformly strong and the set contains just enough surprises to prop up the misfires. © Timothy Monger /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 38,99
CD€ 27,99

Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 1972 | Geffen

Hi-Res
This is the ultimate Neil Diamond record. Not necessarily the best -- he's at his most appealing crafting in the studio -- but certainly the ultimate, capturing all the kitsch and glitz of Neil Diamond, the showman. And that also means that it's not just loaded with flair, but with filler, songs like "Porcupine Pie," "Soggy Pretzels," and "And the Grass Won't Pay No Mind" -- attempts to write grand, sweeping epics that collapse under their own weight. Still, that's part of the charm of Diamond and while it can sound unbearable on studio albums, it makes some sense here, surrounded by his pomp and circumstance. That spectacle is the great thing about the record, since it inflates not just his great songs, it gives the weaker moments character. At 20-plus tracks in its original release and various reissues over the years, this does wind up being a little much, but it nevertheless is the one record for casual Neil fans (after the hits collections), since it shows Diamond the icon in full glory. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 19,49
CD€ 13,99

Pop - Verschenen op 1 oktober 1973 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
Neil Diamond puts himself into the shoes of a character, Jonathan Livingston Seagull, writing and singing music compelling and rich in texture and melody, to fit the portrait perfectly in a movie under the same name. Recorded in 1973 for CBS under the pop/rock style genre, Diamond had much help in order to make this into reality. Commend Tom Catalano for the musical direction and Lee Holdridge for the splendid and compelling orchestra and string arrangements. Though Diamond only sings on a few tracks, he does it so with the grace and smooth flair that brings enchantment only like he can. Romantic, fresh, and lively, this album fits the piece of the puzzle the motion picture needed so perfectly. A word of praise and thanks also goes out the hundred-plus musicians rallied to perform orchestral duties. © Shawn M. Haney /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 17,49
CD€ 12,49

Pop - Verschenen op 5 november 1971 | Geffen

Hi-Res
Driven by the hit singles "I Am...I Said" and "Crunchy Granola Suite," Stones is a stronger album than most of Neil Diamond's late-'60s records. Instead of padding the album with mediocre originals, Diamond picked several fine covers to fill out the remainder of the album, including Roger Miller's "Husbands and Wives," Joni Mitchell's "Chelsea Morning," Leonard Cohen's "Suzanne," Randy Newman's "I Think It's Gonna Rain," Jacques Brel's "If You Go Away," and Tom Paxton's "The Last Thing on My Mind." There are still a few weak patches on Stones, but the record remains an engaging collection of mainstream pop. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 19,49
CD€ 13,99

Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 1980 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
Neil Diamond's 1980 screen turn as a charismatic singer torn between Jewish tradition and pop music stardom spawned this phenomenally successful soundtrack album -- six million copies and counting. Diamond's 21st century resurgence as a walking item of kitsch has sparked renewed interest in the bombastic melting-pot jam "America," as well as his signature late-career ballad "Hello Again." In addition, the lite FM favorite "Love on the Rocks" is classic, raw-throated Neil. But beyond these notables, The Jazz Singer is an album of passable pop songs that stand on the edge of disco and in the grip of melodrama. The hyper "You Baby" is dressed up with an audio clip marking the film's embarrassing black face sequence, while the album's midsection sags with songs that shine like Sunset Strip billboards, yet lack any real substance. Swelling strings and lovely lyrics abound, but it all seems directionless, as if Diamond's just going through the motions. Similarly, Jewish traditionals like "Kol Nidre/My Name is Yussel" are important as thematic elements. But removed from the film and in the context of open-collared, glitzy numbers like "Hey Louise," their reverence is off-putting. As it's aged, The Jazz Singer has come to mark the moment when Diamond fully embraced his soft rock audience and completely turned his back on the ambition and spine-tingling vocal presence of his early career. That decision certainly proved to be an economic winner, but it ignored the fact that his most resonant performances really tear into a song with true mirth. The Jazz Singer's big hits have this quality -- a fact not lost on a new generation of listeners who revel in Diamond's powerful voice and showmanship. But the album's bulk is as wooden as Neil's acting. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 48,99
CD€ 34,99

Pop - Verschenen op 31 maart 2017 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€ 38,99
CD€ 27,99

Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 1972 | Geffen

Hi-Res
This is the ultimate Neil Diamond record. Not necessarily the best -- he's at his most appealing crafting in the studio -- but certainly the ultimate, capturing all the kitsch and glitz of Neil Diamond, the showman. And that also means that it's not just loaded with flair, but with filler, songs like "Porcupine Pie," "Soggy Pretzels," and "And the Grass Won't Pay No Mind" -- attempts to write grand, sweeping epics that collapse under their own weight. Still, that's part of the charm of Diamond and while it can sound unbearable on studio albums, it makes some sense here, surrounded by his pomp and circumstance. That spectacle is the great thing about the record, since it inflates not just his great songs, it gives the weaker moments character. At 20-plus tracks in its original release and various reissues over the years, this does wind up being a little much, but it nevertheless is the one record for casual Neil fans (after the hits collections), since it shows Diamond the icon in full glory. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 58,49
CD€ 41,99

Pop - Verschenen op 30 november 2018 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€ 19,49
CD€ 13,99

Pop - Verschenen op 15 juli 1972 | Geffen

Hi-Res
Moods finds Neil Diamond attempting to craft a more ambitious and substantial album than his usual pop record through heavy orchestration, but the results only work when he sticks to catchy pop-rock, as on "Song Sung Blue," "High Rolling Man," and "Play Me." © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 21,49
CD€ 14,99

Pop - Verschenen op 8 november 2005 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
Calling 12 Songs Neil Diamond's best album in three decades may be a little misleading: truth be told, it doesn't have much competition in his discography. While Diamond never stopped making albums, he did seem progressively less interested in recording sometime after the Robbie Robertson-produced 1976 album Beautiful Noise. Following that weird, ambitious album, he pursued a slicker, streamlined course and started writing less original material. For a while, this paid off great commercial dividends, culminating in his 1980 remake of the Al Jolson film The Jazz Singer, but after 1982's Heartlight he slowly drifted off the pop charts. Over the next two decades, he toured regularly, turning out a new album every three or four years, and their patchwork nature of a few covers and a few originals suggested that Diamond wasn't as engaged in either the writing or recording process as he was at the peak of his career. With 2001's Three Chord Opera he delivered his first album of all-original material since Beautiful Noise, which was also his first non-concept album since 1991's Lovescape (he spent the interim cutting theme albums, such as a record devoted to Brill Building pop or a country-oriented collection). While it was uneven, it did suggest that Diamond was re-engaging with both writing and recording, and as he prepared material for a new record, he received word that producer Rick Rubin -- the man responsible for Johnny Cash's acclaimed '90s comeback, American Recordings -- was interested in working with him, and the two combined for the project that turned out to be 12 Songs. Rubin was the first producer to push Diamond since Robbie Robertson, but where Robertson indulged the singer/songwriter, Rubin drove Neil to strip his music down to his essence. As Diamond's candid liner notes reveal, Rubin wasn't a co-writer, he was a precise and exacting editor, encouraging Neil to rework songs, abandon some tunes, and to keep writing. The process worked, as Diamond wound up with a set of 12 songs (actually, 13 on the special edition that contains two bonus tracks, including an alternate version of "Delirious Love" featuring a delirious Brian Wilson contribution) that result in his most consistent set of songs ever. This is entirely Rubin's doing, since he's the first producer to exercise such tight control over one of Diamond's albums. Where Tom Catalano, the producer of Neil's '60s and early-'70s work, let Diamond indulge in flights of fancy and sheer weirdness, Rubin keeps him on a tight leash, only allowing a couple of light, cheerful songs into the finished product. Instead of encouraging Neil to write these rollicking, effortlessly hooky pop songs, Rubin brings the moody undercurrents of "Girl, You'll Be a Woman Soon" and "Solitary Man" to the forefront, pushing Diamond toward somber, introspective territory that his music suggested but never truly explored in the past. To highlight this mood, Rubin keeps the arrangements spare, even skeletal, reminiscent of the monochromatic nature of his Cash collaborations. 12 Songs also shares with American Recordings a creeping sense of mortality, but where that sounded natural coming from Johnny Cash, it's slightly affected here, since even when Diamond attempts to reach inward it's offset by his natural inclination toward hamminess. And that flair for the theatrical almost begs out for arrangements that are a little bit more fleshed out than what's here -- not something as slickly cold as what he did in the late '70s, but something similar to the rich yet fruity orchestrations Catalano brought to Diamond's best songs. But if 12 Songs does occasionally come across as slightly affected in its intent and presentation, it also is inarguably Neil Diamond's best set of songs in a long, long time. Diamond's writing is not only more ambitious than it has been in years, but it's also more fully realized; the songs are tightly written, with the melodies bringing out the emotions in the lyrics. Similarly, Diamond also sounds engaged as a performer, singing with passion and unexpected understatement; it's his most controlled, varied vocal performance ever, and even if Rubin's production is a bit too stark, it does force listeners to concentrate on the songs, which makes this a better case for Diamond's talents as a songwriter than most of his other albums. And that's why 12 Songs is, in a way, even more welcome than American Recordings. Where Cash's comeback confirmed what everybody already knew about him, this presents a side of Neil Diamond that's never been heard on record and, in the process, it offers a new way of looking at the rest of his catalog -- which is a pretty remarkable achievement, but the best thing about 12 Songs is that it's simply one of the most entertaining, satisfying albums Diamond has ever released. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 21,49
CD€ 14,99

Pop - Verschenen op 2 oktober 2010 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
After two excellent collaborations with Rick Rubin, Neil Diamond can't resist taking the production reins himself for this collection of (mostly) covers. His liner notes claim these songs as some of his favorites from the "rock era" -- implying it's over. While this set is more intimate than most of his overblown production of the last 30 years, it is a step away from the simplicity of his work with Rubin, featuring full strings, chamber reeds, winds, and brass on various cuts. As a vocalist, Diamond's dramatic -- rather than involved -- authority is his trademark; he imposes it on almost every track. It works well here -- sometimes: the reading of Bill Withers' "Ain't No Sunshine" is excellent for this reason, more like a playwright's look than a lover's. The fiddle in Lennon and McCartney's "Blackbird" adds warmth to Diamond's declamatory vocal. Randy Newman's "Feels Like Home" is a set high point: it so intimate, naked, and desperate -- uncharacteristic of the ultra-private Diamond -- it can stop the listener in her tracks; it feels unintentionally included on this collection. The restrained narrative storyteller's presentation of "Midnight Train to Georgia" is, despite its simple delivery, more empathic than passionate. The reading of Leonard Cohen's transcendent "Hallelujah" is not definitive by any means, but it best illustrates Diamond's intention to pay homage to the song -- it's an excellent version to add to the bunch that already exists. Lesley Duncan's "Love Song" (Elton John's reading on Tumbleweed Connection is the classic) is quietly yet exotically treated with layered acoustic guitars, a spare piano, and King Errisson's imaginative hand percussion. Harry Nilsson's "Don't Forget Me," which bookends the album, is another high point with a celebratory horn chart underscoring the romantic world-weary irony in Diamond's delivery. Some tracks just don't work. Gilbert O'Sullivan's "Alone Again (Naturally)" sounds like the maudlin, trite novelty it is. Diamond's "I'm a Believer" is rendered with far more drama than necessary. Here it's not an iconic pop song. It comes from the back end of the story -- illustrated by acoustic guitars, cello, and vibraphone, its joy is displaced by resolve, as if the singer is trying to convince himself the song's lyrics are true. Like most covers sets, this is a mixed bag, and it's for the hardcore Diamond fan more than those who admire Home Before Dark, 12 Songs, or his work from the '60s through the mid-'70s. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 19,49
CD€ 13,99

Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 1971 | Geffen

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€ 19,49
CD€ 13,99

Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 1970 | Geffen

Hi-Res
The follow-up to Touching You, Touching Me was an ambitious set of songs, all originals except for a Top 20 cover of "He Ain't Heavy...He's My Brother," including the side-long suite "The African Trilogy" (which featured the hit "Soolaimon"), the number one hit "Cracklin' Rosie," and "Done Too Soon." Going gold within two months, this album confirmed Diamond's breakthrough as a recording star. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 19,49
CD€ 13,99

Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 1978 | Geffen

Hi-Res
Neil Diamond -- the voice, the artist, the entertainer -- is best described through this record as a rhapsody of American pop culture during this period in the late '70s. Directly and appropriately, Diamond sings with sincerity that "the American popular song goes on." Perhaps this record best demonstrates a mission statement of creating an endearing work of music that all Americans can feel happy and satisfied with. Much of the material is uplifting, both in tempo and lyrical expression. Other songs are emotionally gripping and romantically involved. The work as a whole seems to be vintage Diamond, and does not stand out from any of his other records as unique. However, there is one duet that breaks the mold: his passionate showing with Barbra Streisand on the cover song, "You Don't Bring Me Flowers," a slow, powerful, and troubling ballad for those drifting out of relationships. "Forever in Blue Jeans" is the anthem that caught on with easy pop listeners in the late '70s, and continues to be a staple song for Diamond. "Remember Me" is a gentle song of longing and memories concerning past friendships, past loves, and places traveled. The typical Diamond sound is expressed here to perfection, with the vocals of Diamond backed by a stirring and articulate orchestra. The record doesn't dive into any deep ocean of creativity, nor does it strive to meet jazzier expectations. The arrangements and the songwriting are written just well enough to appeal to the easy listening audience, and the marching percussions of Diamond's songs fit the grade. Such a well-performed song of percussion and charging tempo is the cover, "You've Got Your Troubles." Sung with passion and grace, this is Neil Diamond during his peak, and merits a listen for all late-'70s enthusiasts. © Shawn M. Haney /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 21,49
CD€ 14,99

Ambient / New Age / Easy Listening - Verschenen op 22 september 1992 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
While Neil Diamond's The Christmas Album is designed almost exclusively for his adult contemporary constituency, the vocalist still manages to light up most of the obviousness of these standards with his trademark gritty soul and flair for inflection. Opening with the grandeur of "O Come, O Come Emmanuel/We Three Kings of Orient Are" and "Silent Night," the album is awash in rich reds and golds almost immediately. But Diamond has fun with "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town," loosening up with a harmonica solo and a busy, up-tempo arrangement, and "Jingle Bell Rock" does just that with a 1950s doo wop vibe. These moves count as big risks on an album that otherwise tries on every possible Christmas album cliché: children's choirs and histrionic adult ones, crashing cymbals, and tasteful piano that's as warm as a fireplace in December. Thankfully, even when the choirs threaten to outdo him, Diamond keeps the focus on his famous singing voice. A stirring a capella version of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" is a good example of this, and one of The Christmas Album's standouts. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
From
HI-RES€ 30,99
CD€ 21,99

Pop - Verschenen op 17 augustus 2018 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€ 21,49
CD€ 14,99

Pop - Verschenen op 12 mei 2008 | Neil Diamond

Hi-Res
Op Neil Diamonds album 12 Songs (2005) in samenwerking met producer Rick Rubin, stripte de producer de poplegende tot een spaarzaam, akoestisch geluid, zoals hij eerder deed met Johnny Cash in de jaren 90. Kennelijk maakte de ervaring genoeg indruk op Diamond om voor een tweede ronde te gaan. Op Home Before Dark gaan ze voor dezelfde sonische aanpak als zijn voorganger. Op het grootste deel van deze nummers krijgt Diamond bijval van niet meer dan de akoestische gitaar van Mike Campbell en Benmont Tench' piano. Beiden zijn afkomstig uit Tom Petty’s Heartbreakers en werkten mee aan de Cash-opnames. Er is een gevoel van emotionele naaktheid hier, als de 67 jarige Diamond diep graaft in de complexiteiten van zijn leven. Het levert doordringende inzichten op hoogst reflectieve wijze op, terwijl Diamond zijn gave als een meester popmelodiemaker nooit uit het oog verliest. © Jim Allen /TiVo
From
CD€ 21,99

Pop - Verschenen op 30 juni 1992 | Geffen