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Klassiek - Verschenen op 6 oktober 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Le Choix de France Musique
Approaching age 70, American pianist Murray Perahia moves with this release from his longtime home of Sony Classical, formerly Columbia Masterworks, to Deutsche Grammophon. The set of Bach's six French Suites, BWV 812-817, was recorded in a Berlin studio in 2013, but did not appear until three years later. This probably testifies to the complexity of the move, but whatever the case, the wait has been worth it. Perahia has long been a marvelous Bach pianist, but the French Suites perhaps display his skills especially well. The "French suites" designation was applied by later writers, not by Bach himself, but they do capture something of the music, even if the dances involved were as much Italian as French by the time Bach composed them in 1722. They apply deep counterpoint to dance rhythms, and Perahia's genius resides not in some great overarching concept of how to play Bach but in finding the balance between disparate elements in a work, and in finding the human warmth in the result. Each movement is distinctive; each moment unfolds something new. You could really start sampling anywhere, but try the final gigue of the second suite, in C minor, where the little ornaments that form the central feature of the movement each take on a rather eerie individual significance. Perahia avoids extremes of tempo, and his extremely detailed approach could be called intellectual, but only if that word did not denote a certain coolness: Perahia is never cool. A wonderful Bach recording of the sort that one will return to again and again. © TiVo
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Piano solo - Verschenen op 14 september 2009 | Sony Classical

Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - Uitzonderlijke Geluidsopnamen
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 mei 2008 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 oktober 2000 | Sony Classical

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Concertmuziek - Verschenen op 8 april 2011 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 maart 2008 | Sony Classical

Murray Perahia's Bach recordings are low-key, somewhat in the vein suggested by Bach's modest use of the words "Clavier-Übung," keyboard exercise, to describe the partitas played here in their published form. There is none of the eccentricity of Glenn Gould and none of the hard monumentality of András Schiff. Perahia is content to be straightforward and simple, choosing his points of emphasis with care. At first his playing, like Bach's title, seems too modest, but soon you realize that for sheer clarity in polyphonic textures he is unexcelled. The three partitas presented on this program may seem an unlikely trio (and presumably are part of a larger group of recordings to come), but they make a convincing whole that few performers have yet thought of. They embody progressive departure from the conventional structures of the French-style suite of dances that provided Bach's basic blueprint. Hear Perahia's treatment of the building excitement of the Courante of the Partita No. 3 in A minor, BWV 827, track 9, all the more effective because it is so confidently controlled. Perahia delivers the payoff with the big Allemande of the Partita No. 4 in D major, BWV 828, whose nine-minute span vanishes into the flow of time. Perahia's self-effacing style is never going to appeal to everyone, but for those who like it, it has rarely been as effective as it is here. Sony's German engineering should be especially noted; the resonances of the lower ranges of Perahia's piano, so carefully sculpted by the artist, emerge with their colors perfectly reproduced. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 7 oktober 2016 | Sony Classical

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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 11 januari 1999 | Sony Classical

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Piano solo - Verschenen op 14 maart 2008 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 maart 2008 | Sony Classical

Murray Perahia's Bach recordings are low-key, somewhat in the vein suggested by Bach's modest use of the words "Clavier-Übung," keyboard exercise, to describe the partitas played here in their published form. There is none of the eccentricity of Glenn Gould and none of the hard monumentality of András Schiff. Perahia is content to be straightforward and simple, choosing his points of emphasis with care. At first his playing, like Bach's title, seems too modest, but soon you realize that for sheer clarity in polyphonic textures he is unexcelled. The three partitas presented on this program may seem an unlikely trio (and presumably are part of a larger group of recordings to come), but they make a convincing whole that few performers have yet thought of. They embody progressive departure from the conventional structures of the French-style suite of dances that provided Bach's basic blueprint. Hear Perahia's treatment of the building excitement of the Courante of the Partita No. 3 in A minor, BWV 827, track 9, all the more effective because it is so confidently controlled. Perahia delivers the payoff with the big Allemande of the Partita No. 4 in D major, BWV 828, whose nine-minute span vanishes into the flow of time. Perahia's self-effacing style is never going to appeal to everyone, but for those who like it, it has rarely been as effective as it is here. Sony's German engineering should be especially noted; the resonances of the lower ranges of Perahia's piano, so carefully sculpted by the artist, emerge with their colors perfectly reproduced. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 14 september 2009 | Sony Classical

Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 4 maart 1998 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 6 oktober 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Approaching age 70, American pianist Murray Perahia moves with this release from his longtime home of Sony Classical, formerly Columbia Masterworks, to Deutsche Grammophon. The set of Bach's six French Suites, BWV 812-817, was recorded in a Berlin studio in 2013, but did not appear until three years later. This probably testifies to the complexity of the move, but whatever the case, the wait has been worth it. Perahia has long been a marvelous Bach pianist, but the French Suites perhaps display his skills especially well. The "French suites" designation was applied by later writers, not by Bach himself, but they do capture something of the music, even if the dances involved were as much Italian as French by the time Bach composed them in 1722. They apply deep counterpoint to dance rhythms, and Perahia's genius resides not in some great overarching concept of how to play Bach but in finding the balance between disparate elements in a work, and in finding the human warmth in the result. Each movement is distinctive; each moment unfolds something new. You could really start sampling anywhere, but try the final gigue of the second suite, in C minor, where the little ornaments that form the central feature of the movement each take on a rather eerie individual significance. Perahia avoids extremes of tempo, and his extremely detailed approach could be called intellectual, but only if that word did not denote a certain coolness: Perahia is never cool. A wonderful Bach recording of the sort that one will return to again and again. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 15 mei 2001 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 juni 2002 | Sony Classical

There are many listeners who have come to cherish Murray Perahia's Bach, to treasure the fleetness of his fingers, the delicacy of his touch, and the beauty of his tone. There are many listeners who are deeply moved by Perahia's recording of the Goldberg Variations, who hear tragic depths in its first groups of variations, consummate wit in final variations, and heartbreaking nostalgia in the return of the theme. For those many listeners, Perahia's recording of four of Bach's keyboard concertos will be another wonderful disc. There may be other listeners who find Perahia's technique in the outer movements of the Concerto in D major merely adequate, who find his touch in the central movement of the Concerto in F minor more feeble than delicate, and who find his tone in the central movement of the Concerto in G minor more narcissistic than beautiful. There may be other listeners who feel that Perahia's playing is sweet but superficial, who find his interpretations pretty but not profound, who find his direction of the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields tolerable, but not much more. © TiVo

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Murray Perahia in het magazine