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Rock - Verschenen op 21 oktober 1977 | Cleveland International - Epic - Legacy

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Rock - Verschenen op 29 november 2012 | Cleveland International - Epic - Legacy

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2006 | Virgin Catalogue

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1993 | Virgin Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1995 | Virgin Records

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1981 | Epic - Cleveland International

Although it took Meat Loaf and composer Jim Steinman another 12 years to come up with the marketing gimmick of positioning an album as a deliberate follow-up to the multi-platinum Bat Out of Hell, Dead Ringer was the real "Bat Out of Hell II." Once again, Steinman wrote extended, operatic songs with hyperbolic lyrics ("I'll Kill You If You Don't Come Back" was one title) and organized a backup band anchored by E Street Band members Max Weinberg (drums) and Roy Bittan (keyboards), while Meat Loaf sang with a passion all the more compelling for its hint of the ridiculous. In the U.S., with four years separating Bat and Dead Ringer, nobody cared much. But in the U.K., where Bat was still going strong, Dead Ringer topped the charts, and the title track, featuring a perfectly cast Cher as duet singer, went Top Ten. In retrospect, the missing ingredient in the album is Todd Rundgren's pop sensibility as producer; he was the one who knew how long the compositions could go for maximum dramatic impact without becoming exhausting. It was Rundgren who made Bat Out of Hell a fiery listening experience -- producing himself, Meat Loaf often sounded only warmed over. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 5 mei 1993 | Columbia

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 10 november 2003 | Sony Music Media

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Rock - Verschenen op 31 oktober 2006 | EMI

Truth be told, once Meat Loaf had a blockbuster with Bat Out of Hell in 1977, he never really left the bombastic sound of that Todd Rundgren-produced, Jim Steinman-written classic behind. He went through a long stretch where he didn't have any hits -- it's popularly known as the '80s -- but he kept reworking the album, never quite getting it right until he reteamed with Steinman for 1993's Bat Out of Hell II: Back into Hell, which became a surprise international hit, re-establishing Meat Loaf as a major star. After that record, he never went away, continuing to record, tour, and act, but nothing quite matched the success of either Bat Out of Hell, so it made perfect sense for Meat to go back to the Bat well a third time in the mid-2000s -- over 12 years since the second Bat and nearly 30 years on from the first. But there was a hitch in his well-laid plan: Steinman didn't want to participate. This was a problem, because the Bat albums were as much Steinman's as they were Meat Loaf's -- and this point was never hidden, either, as Steinman's name was prominent on the cover of both Bats. Undaunted, Meat Loaf went ahead with the project, hiring Desmond Child as producer and picking several older Steinman songs to form the heart of Bat Out of Hell III, which now bore the subtitle of The Monster Is Loose. As the album's fall 2006 release date approached, Steinman took Meat Loaf to court over the record -- after all, not only had he written the Bat Out of Hell albums, but he owned the copyright to the phrase, so Meat needed permission in order to release the record. Permission was eventually granted in an out-of-court settlement, paving the way for the October 2006 release of Bat Out of Hell III, a record that had many Steinman songs but in no way features his involvement in the recording or production of the album. And, boy, is his absence ever felt! His presence looms large over the record -- quite obviously on the songs he wrote, but the very aesthetic of the album is copied wholesale from his blueprints -- yet it's the ways that Bat III is different, both big and small, that points out who is missing at this party. For one, this Bat is quite obviously a patchwork, pieced together from things borrowed and re-created, never quite gelling the way either of the previous Bats did. And if there's one thing that theatrical rock like this needs, it's a narrative through-line or at least a concrete goal. Child and Meat Loaf do have a goal, but it's merely to re-create the glory days; they're not quite so picky on how they get there. So, Child brings in Mötley Crüe's Nikki Sixx and Marilyn Manson's guitarist John 5 to pen the opening "The Monster Is Loose," and the results are disarming, a grindingly metallic riff-rocker that sits very uncomfortably next to Steinman's "It's All Coming Back to Me Now," written with Meat in mind (at least according to the singer) but taken to the charts by Celine Dion. Such jarring shifts in tone are common throughout The Monster Is Loose, not just as it moves from song to song, but within the tunes themselves, as Child's compositions chase after the grandeur of Steinman's work yet bear all the marks of a professional who is playing a game without bothering to learn the rules. The same is true for the very sound of Bat III. Although original Bat producer Todd Rundgren adds some necessary pomp with his vocal arrangements, the album is at once too heavy and too clinical, lacking the gaudy, gonzo soul that made Bat Out of Hell irresistible camp. It's a brightly lit mess, but there is a redeeming factor here and that's Meat Loaf, who is singing his heart out as he valiantly tries to make this Bat a worthy successor to the originals. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2004 | EMI

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Rock - Verschenen op 9 september 2016 | Savoy

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Op zijn dertiende album Braver Than We Are werkt zanger Meat Loaf opnieuw samen met Jim Steinman, met wie hij al eerder diverse platen opnam. Voor de productie van het album uit 2016 wordt Paul Crook (Anthrax) aangetrokken. Bijzonder aan Braver Than We Are is dat op het album ook de zangeressen Karla DeVito en Ellen Foley te horen zijn. De laatste kennen we natuurlijk nog van haar bijdrage aan de Meat Loaf-klassieker "Paradise By The Dashboard Light". © TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2011 | EMI Catalogue

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Rock - Verschenen op 16 september 2016 | Savoy

Op zijn dertiende album Braver Than We Are werkt zanger Meat Loaf opnieuw samen met Jim Steinman, met wie hij al eerder diverse platen opnam. Voor de productie van het album uit 2016 wordt Paul Crook (Anthrax) aangetrokken. Bijzonder aan Braver Than We Are is dat op het album ook de zangeressen Karla DeVito en Ellen Foley te horen zijn. De laatste kennen we natuurlijk nog van haar bijdrage aan de Meat Loaf-klassieker "Paradise By The Dashboard Light". © TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2008 | EMI

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 24 mei 1984 | Arista

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 3 oktober 1995 | Epic - Cleveland International

Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 10 november 1998 | Epic - Cleveland International

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Unlike previous collections Epic has assembled, the double-disc The Very Best of Meat Loaf draws not only from his recordings for the label, but it also licenses his '90s comeback recordings for MCA. Which means, of course, that the 20-track collection is, indeed, the "very best" of Meat Loaf. Not all of his charting hits are here -- "What You See Is What You Get," his 1971 single with Stoney, is absent, as is "I'm Gonna Love Her for the Both of Us," the only hit he had between the two Bat out of Hell albums -- but all of the key album tracks from the two blockbusters are here, along with highlights from the sequels to the sequel, which means everything that anyone but a die-hard Meat Loaf fan could want is on this collection: ("Paradise by the Dashboard Light," "Two out of Three Ain't Bad," "You Took the Words Right out of My Mouth," "Bat out of Hell," "I'd Do Anything for Love (But I Won't Do That)," "Rock & Roll Dreams Come Through," "Objects in the Rear View Mirror May Appear Closer Than They Are," and a remix of "Life Is a Lemon and I Want My Money Back"). That said, it is true that either the two Bat out of Hell albums are a more cohesive listen than this set, simply because they were designed as complete albums. Consequently, casual fans may be just as happy to purchase those two discs, which will set them back about as much as The Very Best of Meat Loaf, but anyone who wants all the hits on one set should pick this up. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 26 maart 2009 | Sony Music UK

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | EMI

Hang Cool Teddy Bear is misschien geen expliciete opvolger van Bat Out of Hell, maar er staat zeker genoeg bombast op om iedereen te doen geloven dat dit het vierde deel van Bat is. Dat is het natuurlijk niet. Want in tegenstelling tot die drie carrière bepalende albums, heeft Hang Cool Teddy Bear een daadwerkelijk verhaallijn – een vaag, onvolmaakt verhaal van een gewonde soldaat – in plaats van alleen maar conceptueel te zijn, een verschil dat het album vorm zou moeten geven, vooral gekoppeld aan Rob Cavallos knisperige, heldere productie. Cavallo corrigeert alle fouten op het onhandige metalwerk van Bat Out of Hell III – de gladde, overwerkte nummers als een onhandig overblijfsel uit dat grote haardostijdperk van de jaren 80 op de Sunset Strip – maar het album moet het nog altijd stellen zonder de nummers van Steinman. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 23 oktober 1987 | Arista