Your basket is empty

Categories :

Vergelijkbare artiesten

Albums

From
CD€ 14,99

Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 20 januari 2017 | EMI

Sincere, wide-ranging and deeply personal, Loyle Carner’s 2017 debut Yesterday’s Gone is nothing short of brilliant. Sitting in stark contrast to the harsher sounds coming from other South London MCs, he stands out for his languid vocal delivery and confessional lyrics. Forget every stereotype you know of the puff-chested womanizer - here we have a rapper who’s prepared to bare his soul. And what lies there? A guy who enjoys making pancakes, second-guesses the text he sent to a girl at 2am and whose mum calls him a ‘shmoo’. At points, the intimacy gauge swings so high that it feels less like an album and more like a diary recital; secret confessions, inner-most thoughts, vulnerability and all. The stunning opener The Isle of Arran gets things rolling with a flood of euphoria and emotion, paring a gospel choir with clever wordplay that questions God and the effect of having an absent father (“There’s nothing to believe in, believe me”). Carner starts the record as he means to go on - centred in domestic life, an anchor that clearly extends well beyond his creative output. On Swear he teases his mum for her bad language while on Sun of Jean, which describes his close bond with his family, his mum recites a poem over a piano played by Carner’s late father. Aside from family, we’re treated to a kaleidoscope of other topics and life experiences. Whether they’re layered sensitively over jazzy interludes and lofi beats or punched out over high-energy basslines, Carner’s astute observations always hit the mark. Nominated for a Mercury prize and lauded by fans and critics alike, this record catapulted Loyle Carner onto the main stage of hip-hop. And it’s obvious why. © Abi Church/Qobuz
From
CD€ 14,99

Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 19 april 2019 | AMF

In January 2017, the world was left stunned by the release of Yesterday’s Gone; the UK hadn’t produced a rapper of this calibre for quite some time. With this debut album, Benjamin Gerrard Coyle-Larner aka Loyle Carner sensationally burst onto the hip-hop scene, notable for his extraordinary talent more than the relaxed vibe of his record. Loyle Carner does not follow in the path of his contemporaries on the grime scene, but rather the masters of the golden age (Jurassic 5, Slum Village, A Tribe Called Quest), creating a flow that’s melancholic and almost casual, without the slightest aggressiveness and with extremely mature writing for a 22 year-old.Every nook and cranny of his compositions is imbued with the soul and jazz that he grew up on, and as always with him, storytelling is at the heart of Carner’s sophomore album Not Waving, But Drowning. More of a writer than a rapper, Loyle Carner covers all kinds of subjects, from his mother to football (the penalty shootout between England and Colombia during the 2018 World Cup on It's Coming Home?) to his two fathers (his biological black father and the white father who raised him) and even world-renowned chefs Yotam Ottolenghi and Antonio Carluccio to whom he devotes two songs! With more analogue sounds than on Yesterday’s Gone, Loyle Carner unrolls a soundtrack mixing good old-fashioned boom bap and light funk. And on Desoleil (Brilliant Corners), he hands the mic over to Sampha and on Loose Ends to Jorja Smith, just to spice up a faultless album. Sublime. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz