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Klassiek - Verschenen op 20 mei 2011 | Sony Classical

Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 september 2012 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili is a phenomenon, and kudos to Sony Classical for snagging her! This is Chopin of the old school, with massive interposition of the performer between music and listener. And it's glorious. The Piano Sonata No. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 35, is an absolutely original reading, with that black belt of classical pianism, a fresh rendition of the famous funeral march, with real involvement in the emotional content of the movement. This is a Chopin funeral march played after someone actually died, and the moment of chilly nihilism that serves as the finale is really a bit scary here. The big Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52, is hardly less stirring. Buniatishvili races forward at times, delays as if in torture at other times, and has the skills and the raw power to pull it all off. Are there problems? Sure. It's true that a 19th-century virtuoso recital would have freely mixed orchestral and solo music, but the live performance of the Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21, doesn't quite fit here, partly because the acoustic of the Salle Pleyel in Paris is nothing like that of the Jesus-Christus-Kirche in Berlin, where the other pieces were recorded. And a few of Buniatishvili's dynamic contrasts go beyond anything Chopin could have accomplished with his own piano or even intended. But these are the flaws that serve only to point up the considerable accomplishments elsewhere. This is the kind of Chopin playing that people used to line up to hear. © TiVo
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Piano solo - Verschenen op 15 maart 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 5 februari 2016 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
This is not exactly an easy program offered up to us by diabolical Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili (* 1987): Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky, Ravel's La Valse and the Three movements from Petrushka by Stravinsky - three of the biggest and fiercest works of the piano repertoire. After her Liszt and Chopin albums, the new album shows that young and spirited musician has a bright future, even though her career has already seen her appear on some of the world's brightest stages, with orchestras of the highest order. To compar her to a young Martha Argerich is not far from the truth... It is up to the listener to decide whether he/she wishes to be led astray into extreme extraordinary sounds, rhythms and rubato, all of which are embraced by Buniatishvili, but it is clear that her charm, power and persuasion are most compelling. © SM / Qobu
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 oktober 2020 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
Lang Lang would have called it Piano Book. But Cartier’s new muse decided to add a touch of mystery. Once again surfing on the wave of neo-classical-ambient piano initiated by the likes of Nils Frahm and Alexis Ffrench, one of the most famous personalities in the classical world has decided to bring her audience a collection of inescapable pieces. The works have a subtle feel and a gently melancholic character, captured in an acoustic recording (in the Grande Salle Pierre Boulez at the Philharmonie de Paris) where the recording’s fluffy character has deliberately been enhanced. Labyrinth is a playlist of some of the classical repertoire’s greatest hits. We find the likes of Satie’s Gymnopédie No. 1, J.S. Bach's Badinerie, Rachmaninov’s Prelude No. 4 Vocalise, Couperin’s Les barricades mystérieuses and Liszt’s Consolation No. 3.Throughout the 18 pieces, which include at least two lesser-known pieces (Villa-Lobos’ Valsa da dor and Pärt’s Pari intervallo), Khatia Buniatishvili doesn’t force contrasts. Instead, she plunges the listener into another dimension. Style is no longer the Georgian pianist’s concern. Emotion becomes abstract. There is only one spirit; that of her travelling soul.Nothing - and no one - will be able to compete with the profoundly philosophical character of this new concept album. “The labyrinth”, says the artist “is our fate and creation; our impasse and deliverance; the polyphony of life, senses, reawakened dreams and the neglected present; unexpected and expected turnings of the said or unsaid... The labyrinth of our mind.” © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 19 mei 2014 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
As she has demonstrated in her critically acclaimed albums of the keyboard music of Liszt and Chopin, Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili is a stunning virtuoso with impressive skills and her dynamic playing compels listening. However, for her 2014 Sony album, Motherland, she finds subtle expressions in her favorite character pieces, and none of them could be considered showstoppers. Most of the selections reflect calm and intimate moods, typified by Bach's Sheep May Safely Graze, Tchaikovsky's Autumn Song, Debussy's Clair de lune, and Ravel's Pavane pour une infante défunte, while the liveliest pieces, which include Mendelssohn's Song Without Words in F sharp minor, György Ligeti's Musica Ricercata No. 7, Dvorák's Slavonic Dance in E minor, and Scarlatti's Sonata in E major, offer rather modest displays of technique. Instead of dazzling her listeners, Buniatishvili is putting forward her personal, private side in this understated program, and the key to her selections is the sense of yearning that these pieces evoke. The most passionate outpouring of emotion comes in her own arrangement of Vaguiorko ma, a Georgian folk song that surely must hold a special place in her emotional world. Because this is a gentle and poignant album, listeners may find it is best appreciated in a quiet space with few distractions. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 maart 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
The notes for this Sony Classical release of Rachmaninoff's two most popular piano concertos raise the question of overexposure, which may be put to many classical warhorses that are recorded repeatedly and sold to the public time and again. While Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor and his Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor are indeed among the most popular concertos of all time and the most frequently programmed of his four piano concertos, practically every virtuoso feels obligated to record them, and labels often try to disguise the redundancy of the product through eye-catching packaging and hype. Fortunately, this 2017 release by Khatia Buniatishvili and the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Paavo Järvi, offers something that is of real value in the extraordinarily clear performances and the transparent recorded sound. Whether it was achieved through close microphone placement or judicious engineering in the studio, Buniatishvili is fully audible and placed squarely in the center of the mix, so her incisive playing is never dulled by the periodic thickness of the orchestration or swamped by acoustics. The exposition of the first movement of the Piano Concerto No. 2 immediately reveals how well she sounds, elevated above the ponderous statement of the main theme. However, Buniatishvili is at her finest in the quieter slow movements, where her refined playing and sensitive expressions are natural and unforced, and Rachmaninoff's limpid scoring gives her room to breathe. Newcomers to these concertos would do well to consider this recording as one of the best available, while Buniatishvili's fans will be thrilled by her dazzling playing. © TiVo
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Piano solo - Verschenen op 19 mei 2014 | Sony Classical

Booklet
As she has demonstrated in her critically acclaimed albums of the keyboard music of Liszt and Chopin, Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili is a stunning virtuoso with impressive skills and her dynamic playing compels listening. However, for her 2014 Sony album, Motherland, she finds subtle expressions in her favorite character pieces, and none of them could be considered showstoppers. Most of the selections reflect calm and intimate moods, typified by Bach's Sheep May Safely Graze, Tchaikovsky's Autumn Song, Debussy's Clair de lune, and Ravel's Pavane pour une infante défunte, while the liveliest pieces, which include Mendelssohn's Song Without Words in F sharp minor, György Ligeti's Musica Ricercata No. 7, Dvorák's Slavonic Dance in E minor, and Scarlatti's Sonata in E major, offer rather modest displays of technique. Instead of dazzling her listeners, Buniatishvili is putting forward her personal, private side in this understated program, and the key to her selections is the sense of yearning that these pieces evoke. The most passionate outpouring of emotion comes in her own arrangement of Vaguiorko ma, a Georgian folk song that surely must hold a special place in her emotional world. Because this is a gentle and poignant album, listeners may find it is best appreciated in a quiet space with few distractions. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 juli 2020 | Sony Classical

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