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Folk - Verschenen op 1 oktober 1960 | Craft Recordings

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Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 2003 | A&M

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Pop - Verschenen op 1 mei 1975 | A&M

Joan Baez's landmark Diamonds & Rust found her at the peak of her singer/songwriter skills, seemingly capable of transitioning out of '60s protest mode into a more contemporary and commercially viable position. It was also around this time that she toured with Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue, and according to Baez's memoirs, she wrote the songs for Gulf Winds during that tour. But Gulf Winds, her last A&M album, was a significant drop off and marked the beginning of what would be a steep commercial decline. Produced by David Kershenbaum, the album tries its best to bolster Baez with a timely '70s studio sound, but for the most part it misses the mark. The songs just aren't up to the task. "Sweeter for Me" sports a nice arppegiated piano by Baez and faintly harks to the melancholy brilliance of Diamonds & Rust, but, lyrically, most of the material is overwritten. The more stinging, faster-paced "O Brother!" is a more successful stab at a commercial sound, and Baez sings it with a bitter venom (you can't help but speculate that the song refers to Dylan himself). The standout track on an otherwise forgettable album, though, is surely the title track, "Gulf Winds," a ten-and-a-half-minute solo epic in the mold of her early work, just Joan and her acoustic guitar, brilliantly picked and sung, ironically demonstrating that, although Baez still had the talent, she couldn't capitalize on the success of Diamonds and Rust and the times were passing her by. © Jim Esch /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 1 mei 1975 | A&M

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Joan Baez's landmark Diamonds & Rust found her at the peak of her singer/songwriter skills, seemingly capable of transitioning out of '60s protest mode into a more contemporary and commercially viable position. It was also around this time that she toured with Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue, and according to Baez's memoirs, she wrote the songs for Gulf Winds during that tour. But Gulf Winds, her last A&M album, was a significant drop off and marked the beginning of what would be a steep commercial decline. Produced by David Kershenbaum, the album tries its best to bolster Baez with a timely '70s studio sound, but for the most part it misses the mark. The songs just aren't up to the task. "Sweeter for Me" sports a nice arppegiated piano by Baez and faintly harks to the melancholy brilliance of Diamonds & Rust, but, lyrically, most of the material is overwritten. The more stinging, faster-paced "O Brother!" is a more successful stab at a commercial sound, and Baez sings it with a bitter venom (you can't help but speculate that the song refers to Dylan himself). The standout track on an otherwise forgettable album, though, is surely the title track, "Gulf Winds," a ten-and-a-half-minute solo epic in the mold of her early work, just Joan and her acoustic guitar, brilliantly picked and sung, ironically demonstrating that, although Baez still had the talent, she couldn't capitalize on the success of Diamonds and Rust and the times were passing her by. © Jim Esch /TiVo
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Folk - Verschenen op 1 januari 2006 | Vanguard Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 20 november 2000 | One World Productions

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Folk - Verschenen op 7 april 2017 | Proper Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2015 | BDMUSIC

Booklet
A direct descendant of founders Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, Joan Baez will forever remain the queen of sixties protest folk, an icon, even. Against the backdrop of the civil rights struggle and the Vietnam War, this daughter of a Mexican father and a Scottish mother gradually moved away from the artistic preoccupations of her ex, Bob Dylan, to throw herself into the struggle, joining the ranks of organisations like Amnesty International. But all her political commitments would never strip the poetry from her music.  And even when she does revisit her teachers (Dylan, Guthrie, Donovan), the otherworldly beauty of her voice intoxicates the listener. Later, as she changed with the times, Joan Baez would sometimes drop her pure folk sound to beef up her instrumentation... Human rights, LGBT causes, the fight against the death penalty and the fight for the environment were all causes which she tenaciously carried throughout the four magnificent albums which are collected here: Folk Singers ‘Round Harvard Square (1959) with Bill Wood and Ted Alevizos, Joan Baez (1960), Joan Baez Vol. 2 (1961) and the live recording, Joan Baez in Concert (1962). This striking snapshot of an era resonates today with the same intensity. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Folk - Verschenen op 2 maart 2018 | Proper Records

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After a decade of discographic silence, the high priestess of folk comes out of her reservation to remind us of the aura and uniqueness of her voice. It is a necessary inner cry in respect of the still troubled times that is Trump’s America. The engaged artist that she has always been had to express herself, again and again, on her favorite themes. Time has admittedly left a mark on her singing, but not on the intensity of the performances that Joan Baez offers here of songs penned by Tom Waits, Josh Ritter, Anohi, Mary Chapin Carpenter and Joe Henry, who is also the disc’s producer. This is incidentally in her ability to appropriate other’s writings that always fascinated people. And when she revisits The President Sang Amazing Grace, that Zoe Mulford had composed after the Charleston church shooting in June 2015, the emotion is more than intense. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Folk - Verschenen op 1 januari 2006 | Vanguard Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 1 januari 1972 | A&M

With the Vietnam War winding down, Joan Baez, who had devoted one side of her last album to her trip to Hanoi, delivered the kind of commercial album A&M Records must have wanted when it signed her three years earlier. But she did it on her own terms, putting together a session band of contemporary jazz veterans like Larry Carlton, Wilton Felder, and Joe Sample, and mixing a wise selection from the work of current singer-songwriters like Jackson Browne and John Prine with pop covers of Stevie Wonder and the Allman Brothers Band, and an unusually high complement of her own writing. A&M, no doubt recalling the success of her cover of the Band's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down," released her version of the Allmans' "Blue Sky" as a single, and it got halfway up the charts. But the real hit was the title track, a self-penned masterpiece on the singer's favorite subject, her relationship with Bob Dylan. Outdoing the current crop of confessional singer/songwriters at soul baring, Baez sang to Dylan, reminiscing about her '60s love affair with him intensely, affectionately, and unsentimentally. It was her finest moment as a songwriter and one of her finest performances, period, and when A&M finally released it on 45, it made the Top 40, propelling the album to gold status. But those who bought the disc for "Diamonds & Rust" also got to hear "Winds of the Old Days," in which Baez forgave Dylan for abandoning the protest movement, as well as the jazzy "Children and All That Jazz," a delightful song about motherhood, and the wordless vocals of "Dida," a duet with Joni Mitchell accompanied by Mitchell's backup band, Tom Scott and the L.A. Express. The cover songs were typically accomplished, making this the strongest album of Baez's post-folk career. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 2 augustus 2019 | Craft Recordings

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Folk - Verschenen op 3 november 1980 | Columbia

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Folk - Verschenen op 1 januari 1972 | A&M

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With the Vietnam War winding down, Joan Baez, who had devoted one side of her last album to her trip to Hanoi, delivered the kind of commercial album A&M Records must have wanted when it signed her three years earlier. But she did it on her own terms, putting together a session band of contemporary jazz veterans like Larry Carlton, Wilton Felder, and Joe Sample, and mixing a wise selection from the work of current singer-songwriters like Jackson Browne and John Prine with pop covers of Stevie Wonder and the Allman Brothers Band, and an unusually high complement of her own writing. A&M, no doubt recalling the success of her cover of the Band's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down," released her version of the Allmans' "Blue Sky" as a single, and it got halfway up the charts. But the real hit was the title track, a self-penned masterpiece on the singer's favorite subject, her relationship with Bob Dylan. Outdoing the current crop of confessional singer/songwriters at soul baring, Baez sang to Dylan, reminiscing about her '60s love affair with him intensely, affectionately, and unsentimentally. It was her finest moment as a songwriter and one of her finest performances, period, and when A&M finally released it on 45, it made the Top 40, propelling the album to gold status. But those who bought the disc for "Diamonds & Rust" also got to hear "Winds of the Old Days," in which Baez forgave Dylan for abandoning the protest movement, as well as the jazzy "Children and All That Jazz," a delightful song about motherhood, and the wordless vocals of "Dida," a duet with Joni Mitchell accompanied by Mitchell's backup band, Tom Scott and the L.A. Express. The cover songs were typically accomplished, making this the strongest album of Baez's post-folk career. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Folk - Verschenen op 1 januari 2006 | Vanguard Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 1 december 1971 | Vanguard Records

This soundtrack intersperses acoustic live performances with politically oriented dialog, much of which is spoken by her then-husband, draft resister David Harris. It's certainly one of the most minor entries of her Vanguard catalog. The dialogue is distracting, and the music reasonable but uneven, as Baez offers interpretations of songs by Gram Parsons, Bob Dylan, Tom Paxton, Edwin Hawkins, Leonard Cohen, and "We Shall Overcome." Her cover of Aretha Franklin's "Do Right Woman, Do Right Man," however, was not a good idea. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Folk - Verschenen op 1 januari 1976 | A&M

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Folk - Verschenen op 19 augustus 2019 | RevOla

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Folk - Verschenen op 1 januari 2006 | Vanguard Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 1 november 1976 | A&M

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After recording for the folk label Vanguard for more than a decade, Baez moved to A&M. On this label debut, she maintained her interest in country music, recording in Nashville with some of the city's session aces. She also continued to dedicate herself to radical politics, from her set opener "Prison Trilogy," which pledged, "We're gonna raze the prisons to the ground," to the closer, John Lennon's "Imagine." In between were her call on Bob Dylan to return to protest music ("To Bobby") and her sister Mimi Farina's touching tribute to Janis Joplin, "In the Quiet Morning." © William Ruhlmann /TiVo