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Klassiek - Verschenen op 28 oktober 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
Dutch violinist Janine Jansen has made some unorthodox recordings (check out her Vivaldi Four Seasons sometime), but here, in a work in which proportion and technique are exquisitely balanced, she plays it straight with impressive results. Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 2, composed in 1935 just before his return to the Soviet Union from France, has always been a popular repertory item, but Jansen's reading, ably accompanied by the London Philharmonic Orchestra under Vladimir Jurowski, has a pearly quality throughout, a kind of bright ease, that comes only at the highest levels of technique. Also notable is the combination of the concerto, not with the usual and unnecessary second repertory violin-and-orchestra piece, but with violin works of Prokofiev from roughly the same period. The program as a whole gives not only an added dose of the composer's unusually idiomatic violin writing, but also a slice of his life: the other two pieces are later than the concerto and represent further stages of his compositional life. The rarely heard Sonata for two violins in C major, Op. 56, is a spare and very attractive work that bears some relationship to the genesis of the concerto. The Violin Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 80/1, on the other hand, is a Prokofiev work of the late 1930s, after the grim ramifications of Stalinism for creative artists (not to mention just about everybody else) had begun to sink in; it's one of the few Prokofiev works with an emotional content similar to the sense of menace in much of Shostakovich's output. Jansen gets this tone, always a tricky proposition for a non-Russian, and her playing throughout is both perfect and vibrant. If there's a complaint it's with the sound; the duo sonata is closely and harshly miked, capturing the experience of sitting on a piano bench next to the performers rather than that of hearing them in an acoustically well-planned hall. The concerto and the violin-and-piano sonata are better, but no great shakes. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 januari 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
And why not pair the Brahms Violin Concerto with Bartók? While the assembly is probably a first in the history of discography, it is true that Brahms and Bartók are of Hungarian descent - well, Brahms comes from Gypsy-Viennese origins rather than purely Hungarian traditions, but the heart is most certainly there - so too is that ever-present tendancy for ample melodic phrasing, so aptly captured by the violin where a piano simply falls short. Moreover, only thirty short years separate the two works: one for 1878, another in 1908... The Bartók Concerto comes with a story: the composer had offered it up as gift of a somewhat unrequited love to a young Stefi Geyer, who kept the score to her death, without ever playing it. Meanwhile, Bartók wrote another concerto thirty years later, at one time thought to be the one and only of its kind and genre. The "first" concerto was created in 1958 under the leadership of Paul Sacher. For this recording with Antonio Pappano, Dutch violinist Janine Jansen is completely at ease in the great concerto repertoire. Jansen plays a 1727 Stradivarius and brings great passion, emotion and skill to the world chamber music. The Brahms Concerto was recorded live in Rome in February 2015, the Bartók in London in August 2014. © SM / Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 maart 2006 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Hi-Res Audio
Eschewing its usual heavy orchestral sound in favor of a more stripped-down instrumentation, Dutch violinist Janine Jansen's second album offers a fresh interpretation of one of the most performed classical works, Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. The 2005 follow-up to her Barry Wordsworth-conducted debut, the subtle but passionate renditions of the "La Primavera," "L'estate," "L'autunno," and "L'inverno" concertos are performed with a sparse, eight-piece ensemble including Lithuanian violinist Julian Rachlin, her cellist brother Maarten, and harpsichordist father Jan. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2012 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Hi-Res Audio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 30 maart 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Even though violinist Janine Jansen appears alone in the cover photo of this 2012 Decca release, and her name is featured in large letters, no one should mistake this album as a solo effort. The recordings of Franz Schubert's String Quintet in C major and Arnold Schoenberg's sextet Verklärte Nacht are ensemble performances, and the musicians who play with Jansen form an artistic bond that seems utterly at odds with the star-oriented artwork. Jansen is certainly behind the choice of works, because they were programmed on her critically praised concert at Wigmore Hall. But beyond Decca's marketing decision emphasizing Jansen as the main performer, equal attention should be given to her colleagues, violinist Boris Brovtsyn, violists Amichai Grosz and Maxim Rysanov, and cellists Torleif Thedéen and Jens Peter Maintz, who are all comparable in technical skill and expressive abilities. The performance of Verklärte Nacht is impassioned and dark, and the richness of the lower strings contributes greatly to the nocturnal atmosphere of the piece. However, this is also a dynamic work, and Schoenberg's nearly orchestral counterpoint gives intense activity to all six players, with no single part standing out. Schubert's quintet is a trickier piece to get right, because the writing is exposed and transparent in virtually every area of the piece, so no one can get away with inferior playing. On balance, the Schoenberg shows the musicians as a cohesive team that can forge ahead, confronting dense textures and complex harmonies with a forward impetus that makes sense of the tone poem's turbulent emotional imagery, while the Schubert gives the musicians an opportunity to achieve sublime expressions of beauty and transcendence through their control and cooperation. Decca's sound is quite close-up, so practically everything is audible, including the breathing. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 september 2021 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 15 januari 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Listeners looking for an exercise in virtuosity may find Janine Jansen's 2007 Bach recording a disappointment; the serious nature of the program precludes showboating. But listeners hoping that Jansen had more musical individuality to offer than was revealed in her early recordings of standard violin showpieces may find this recording a wonderful surprise. In the Inventions, Jansen is an equal partner with violist Maxim Rysanov and cellist Torleif Thedéen in performances of wit, feeling, and subtle grace. In the Partita and especially its excruciatingly ecstatic Chaconne, Jansen delivers consummate musicality and surpassing emotional honesty. Decca's sound is close and evocative. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 30 september 2016 | Universal Music, a division of Universal International Music BV

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 juli 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 14 juli 2003 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 maart 2006 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Eschewing its usual heavy orchestral sound in favor of a more stripped-down instrumentation, Dutch violinist Janine Jansen's second album offers a fresh interpretation of one of the most performed classical works, Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. The 2005 follow-up to her Barry Wordsworth-conducted debut, the subtle but passionate renditions of the "La Primavera," "L'estate," "L'autunno," and "L'inverno" concertos are performed with a sparse, eight-piece ensemble including Lithuanian violinist Julian Rachlin, her cellist brother Maarten, and harpsichordist father Jan. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 28 oktober 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 september 2021 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 januari 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
And why not pair the Brahms Violin Concerto with Bartók? While the assembly is probably a first in the history of discography, it is true that Brahms and Bartók are of Hungarian descent - well, Brahms comes from Gypsy-Viennese origins rather than purely Hungarian traditions, but the heart is most certainly there - so too is that ever-present tendancy for ample melodic phrasing, so aptly captured by the violin where a piano simply falls short. Moreover, only thirty short years separate the two works: one for 1878, another in 1908... The Bartók Concerto comes with a story: the composer had offered it up as gift of a somewhat unrequited love to a young Stefi Geyer, who kept the score to her death, without ever playing it. Meanwhile, Bartók wrote another concerto thirty years later, at one time thought to be the one and only of its kind and genre. The "first" concerto was created in 1958 under the leadership of Paul Sacher. For this recording with Antonio Pappano, Dutch violinist Janine Jansen is completely at ease in the great concerto repertoire. Jansen plays a 1727 Stradivarius and brings great passion, emotion and skill to the world chamber music. The Brahms Concerto was recorded live in Rome in February 2015, the Bartók in London in August 2014. © SM / Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2012 | Universal Music, a division of Universal International Music BV