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Concerten voor klavier - Verschenen op 1 februari 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 september 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Gifted with a vast talent and supported by a powerful global marketing operation, the young Polish-Canadian pianist Jan Lisiecki has now been catapulted into the ranks of the global piano stars. He was 15 when Deutsche Grammophon had him sign an exclusive contract; at 24, standing in for a poorly Murray Perahia, he played Beethoven's five Concertos at the head of the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields for a European tour in eight different cities. There are in fact three stand-in pianists for Perahia, given he is prone to recurrent health problems. Nelson Freire, Rudolf Buchbinder and Jan Lisiecki who performed the five concertos, conducting from his keyboard, on the 2, 4 and 6 December 2018 in the Berlin Konzerthaus. This complete recording was a part of the commemorations of Beethoven's 250th birthday, which is seeing recordings rain down in a monsoon that shows no signs of stopping until Spring 2020. It will not, however, form a part of the monumental box set that Deutsche Grammophon is getting ready to release, and which will cover all the yellow label's previous recordings, in particular those which were made for the 1970 bicentenary. This new album, which adds to the hundreds of other versions, has the merit of youth, and gives a sort of overview of contemporary musical interpretations, of Beethoven in particular, at the start of the 21st Century. It presents a clean bill of health for classical music, and showcases the extraordinary quality of contemporary musicians: so there is much to celebrate. Lisiecki's Beethoven is not only joyful but also radiant, intelligent, agile, and extremely lucid. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 maart 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Although only 21 when this album appeared in early 2017, Polish-Canadian pianist Jan Lisiecki was no newcomer: he had already been on Deutsche Grammophon's roster since 2010 and released several recordings. The buzz surrounding Lisiecki, especially in Poland and its orbit, has been intense, and this recording will show the curious why. Lisiecki has yet to develop real power (and he's hampered by a rather distant NDR studio acoustic from DG), but the music on the program here, catching the moment when Chopin's distinctive style unfurled like a rare flower, fits his style uncannily well. These piano-and-orchestra works (and one posthumous piano nocturne) are not often performed. Probably the most popular piece is the Andante spianato and Grande Polonaise, Op. 22. Its solo piano introduction was composed after the fact and seems imperfectly joined to the polonaise, but Lisiecki's utterly arresting reading will make you forget all about that. Even better are the other piano-and-orchestra pieces, all of them normally counted as second-tier Chopin. Lisiecki doesn't just make a case for them; he calls the whole ranking into question. Sample the two movements of the the Rondo à la Krakowiak, Op. 14, with Lisiecki setting up subtle tension between the opening pentatonic material and the lively krakowiak, Chopin's only essay in this dance form. The Lisztian Fantasy on Polish Airs, Op. 13, is a flashier work and is not quite as successful, but the Variations on "Là ci darem la mano," Op. 2, have an unusual dramatic sense. This is an extremely promising release from a young specialist in Chopin and Mozart. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 januari 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Pianist Jan Lisiecki, just out of his teens when this recording was released, might have been expected to take a safe path with his recording of one of the most popular concertos in the repertory, the Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54. He has done anything but. This recording is unusual in several respects. It eschews the almost universal pairing with the Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16, in favor of a pair of late Schumann works that are rarely performed. But the real news here is the antiheroic and completely counter-to-type Schumann concerto itself. Lisiecki takes as a point of departure a waggish remark by Franz Liszt that the work is a "concerto without piano." The comment was surely a bit backhanded, but it gets to something essential about the piece that most performances do not focus on: in comparison with the common run of Romantic piano concertos, there is comparatively little solo piano work here and quite a few passages in which the piano swirls around within or even underneath the orchestra in basically accompanimental material. Lisiecki's contribution is to tone down the heroic passages and to explore the passagework in a great deal of detail. He's ably backed in this enterprise by the indefatigable Antonio Pappano and the Orchestra dell'Accademia di Santa Cecilia, and also by Deutsche Grammophon's engineers, who coax from the Auditorium Parco della Musica a wide-open sound that exposes Lisiecki's basically interior vision of the work. Another point in the recording's favor is the inclusion of the late Schumann pieces, especially the Introduction and Concert-Allegro, Op. 134, written in 1853 in the twilight of the composer's sanity. This work, never before recorded on Deutsche Grammophon in its 100-plus-year history, was traditionally regarded as part of Schumann's decline, and the booklet notes here reproduce that view. But the young Brahms played the work often, and it had more than a little influence on his first piano concerto. Lisiecki gives a riveting performance, and doesn't try to make it fit the pattern he has laid down with the Concerto in A minor. Should this be the only Schumann A minor in your collection? Probably not: it's quite unorthodox. Does it portend great things from its youthful pianist? Absolutely. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 augustus 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
At only 26 years of age, Jan Lisiecki already boasts an astonishingly extensive and prolific discography. So it should come as no surprise that he is releasing his eighth Deutsche Grammophon album, just one year after his last set of recordings. With Chopin's Nocturnes, the Canadian pianist returns to his beginnings as a piano player, back to simplicity.The recent lockdown period has allowed many artists to flourish in the studio, and Jan Lisiecki is among them. Recording his album last autumn in Berlin's famed Meistersaal, the pianist described how the social standstill has given him a new understanding of time, work and his relationship with music: "They were the most pleasant and relaxed recording sessions I've ever experienced; they were perfect for the Nocturnes. I was able to engage with each piece at my own pace and live with them all in a way that felt completely natural and organic."From an early age, Lisiecki found himself intrigued by the Polish composer’s work in a special way. It was the Nocturnes - especially Op.9 No.1 - that first sparked his connection with Chopin, and they remain significant to him to this day. Over 21 pieces, written by the composer between 1829 and 1847, the Canadian takes us into a world of emotions, timbres and those enchanted melodic-cantabile phrases so typical of Chopin, underpinned by rich harmonization. The genre was relatively new at the time, dedicated to the evening and the night and allowing each performer to evolve their personal emotions and creative freedom, something to which Lisiecki completely surrenders. Extremely simple, soulful and astonishingly slow, the individual nocturnes glide along the keys, almost as if the pianist were too modest to show his virtuosity, but entirely in the spirit of Chopin, who once said himself about music: "Simplicity is the final achievement." © Lena Germann/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 19 april 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 april 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 19 april 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Jan Lisiecki's 2013 Deutsche Grammophon album of Frédéric Chopin's two sets of Études, Opp. 10 and 25, is certainly a bold demonstration of youthful vitality and dynamic virtuosity, but it is also a highly personal interpretation that is surprisingly Romantic in character, if not idiosyncratically so. There's never a worry that he'll miss a note or execute a passage ineptly, for Lisiecki is a fine player who can handle any difficulty these intricate study pieces hold in store. Yet there is always a slight feeling of impending recklessness, as if Lisiecki could turn the music on its head at any moment. Nothing is staid, everything is in motion. After several decades of pianists playing Chopin close to the vest, with a rhythmic regularity and evenness of phrasing that emphasize the Classical impulse, along comes Lisiecki with his flexible dynamics, playful rhythmic teasing, and impulsive expressions, characteristics that are perhaps more suggestive of Liszt's extroverted style than Chopin's introversion. Lisiecki knows that his audience wants bravado and a degree of flamboyance, and these qualities come across fully in his playing here. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is exemplary, with superb clarity and depth. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 augustus 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
At only 26 years of age, Jan Lisiecki already boasts an astonishingly extensive and prolific discography. So it should come as no surprise that he is releasing his eighth Deutsche Grammophon album, just one year after his last set of recordings. With Chopin's Nocturnes, the Canadian pianist returns to his beginnings as a piano player, back to simplicity. The recent lockdown period has allowed many artists to flourish in the studio, and Jan Lisiecki is among them. Recording his album last autumn in Berlin's famed Meistersaal, the pianist described how the social standstill has given him a new understanding of time, work and his relationship with music: "They were the most pleasant and relaxed recording sessions I've ever experienced; they were perfect for the Nocturnes. I was able to engage with each piece at my own pace and live with them all in a way that felt completely natural and organic." From an early age, Lisiecki found himself intrigued by the Polish composer’s work in a special way. It was the Nocturnes - especially Op.9 No.1 - that first sparked his connection with Chopin, and they remain significant to him to this day. Over 21 pieces, written by the composer between 1829 and 1847, the Canadian takes us into a world of emotions, timbres and those enchanted melodic-cantabile phrases so typical of Chopin, underpinned by rich harmonization. The genre was relatively new at the time, dedicated to the evening and the night and allowing each performer to evolve their personal emotions and creative freedom, something to which Lisiecki completely surrenders. Extremely simple, soulful and astonishingly slow, the individual nocturnes glide along the keys, almost as if the pianist were too modest to show his virtuosity, but entirely in the spirit of Chopin, who once said himself about music: "Simplicity is the final achievement." © Lena Germann/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 september 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Gifted with a vast talent and supported by a powerful global marketing operation, the young Polish-Canadian pianist Jan Lisiecki has now been catapulted into the ranks of the global piano stars. He was 15 when Deutsche Grammophon had him sign an exclusive contract; at 24, standing in for a poorly Murray Perahia, he played Beethoven's five Concertos at the head of the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields for a European tour in eight different cities. There are in fact three stand-in pianists for Perahia, given he is prone to recurrent health problems. Nelson Freire, Rudolf Buchbinder and Jan Lisiecki who performed the five concertos, conducting from his keyboard, on the 2, 4 and 6 December 2018 in the Berlin Konzerthaus. This complete recording was a part of the commemorations of Beethoven's 250th birthday, which is seeing recordings rain down in a monsoon that shows no signs of stopping until Spring 2020. It will not, however, form a part of the monumental box set that Deutsche Grammophon is getting ready to release, and which will cover all the yellow label's previous recordings, in particular those which were made for the 1970 bicentenary. This new album, which adds to the hundreds of other versions, has the merit of youth, and gives a sort of overview of contemporary musical interpretations, of Beethoven in particular, at the start of the 21st Century. It presents a clean bill of health for classical music, and showcases the extraordinary quality of contemporary musicians: so there is much to celebrate. Lisiecki's Beethoven is not only joyful but also radiant, intelligent, agile, and extremely lucid. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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CD€ 13,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 maart 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Although only 21 when this album appeared in early 2017, Polish-Canadian pianist Jan Lisiecki was no newcomer: he had already been on Deutsche Grammophon's roster since 2010 and released several recordings. The buzz surrounding Lisiecki, especially in Poland and its orbit, has been intense, and this recording will show the curious why. Lisiecki has yet to develop real power (and he's hampered by a rather distant NDR studio acoustic from DG), but the music on the program here, catching the moment when Chopin's distinctive style unfurled like a rare flower, fits his style uncannily well. These piano-and-orchestra works (and one posthumous piano nocturne) are not often performed. Probably the most popular piece is the Andante spianato and Grande Polonaise, Op. 22. Its solo piano introduction was composed after the fact and seems imperfectly joined to the polonaise, but Lisiecki's utterly arresting reading will make you forget all about that. Even better are the other piano-and-orchestra pieces, all of them normally counted as second-tier Chopin. Lisiecki doesn't just make a case for them; he calls the whole ranking into question. Sample the two movements of the the Rondo à la Krakowiak, Op. 14, with Lisiecki setting up subtle tension between the opening pentatonic material and the lively krakowiak, Chopin's only essay in this dance form. The Lisztian Fantasy on Polish Airs, Op. 13, is a flashier work and is not quite as successful, but the Variations on "Là ci darem la mano," Op. 2, have an unusual dramatic sense. This is an extremely promising release from a young specialist in Chopin and Mozart. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 februari 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 januari 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Pianist Jan Lisiecki, just out of his teens when this recording was released, might have been expected to take a safe path with his recording of one of the most popular concertos in the repertory, the Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54. He has done anything but. This recording is unusual in several respects. It eschews the almost universal pairing with the Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16, in favor of a pair of late Schumann works that are rarely performed. But the real news here is the antiheroic and completely counter-to-type Schumann concerto itself. Lisiecki takes as a point of departure a waggish remark by Franz Liszt that the work is a "concerto without piano." The comment was surely a bit backhanded, but it gets to something essential about the piece that most performances do not focus on: in comparison with the common run of Romantic piano concertos, there is comparatively little solo piano work here and quite a few passages in which the piano swirls around within or even underneath the orchestra in basically accompanimental material. Lisiecki's contribution is to tone down the heroic passages and to explore the passagework in a great deal of detail. He's ably backed in this enterprise by the indefatigable Antonio Pappano and the Orchestra dell'Accademia di Santa Cecilia, and also by Deutsche Grammophon's engineers, who coax from the Auditorium Parco della Musica a wide-open sound that exposes Lisiecki's basically interior vision of the work. Another point in the recording's favor is the inclusion of the late Schumann pieces, especially the Introduction and Concert-Allegro, Op. 134, written in 1853 in the twilight of the composer's sanity. This work, never before recorded on Deutsche Grammophon in its 100-plus-year history, was traditionally regarded as part of Schumann's decline, and the booklet notes here reproduce that view. But the young Brahms played the work often, and it had more than a little influence on his first piano concerto. Lisiecki gives a riveting performance, and doesn't try to make it fit the pattern he has laid down with the Concerto in A minor. Should this be the only Schumann A minor in your collection? Probably not: it's quite unorthodox. Does it portend great things from its youthful pianist? Absolutely. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 11 januari 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 30 augustus 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 augustus 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)