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R&B - Verschenen op 1 juli 2008 | Motown

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R&B - Verschenen op 18 december 1969 | Motown

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Less than two weeks before the 1960s were left to be deciphered in the history books, Motown unleashed Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5 (1969) and in doing so fittingly marked the beginning of a new era in crossover pop and soul. For all intents and purposes, this dozen-song disc introduced the world to the sibling talents of Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon, and most significantly of all, a prepubescent powerhouse named Michael Jackson. The brothers' inextricably tight vocal harmonies were fueled by the ebullience of youth and inexperience while the flames of their collective success were stoked with the funkified vibe of urban America. Immediately evident is the influence that Sly & the Family Stone (whose "Stand!" is an unmitigated zenith in the Jackson 5's care), James Brown, and even Funkadelic had on the J5. In fact, the quintet would actually cover George Clinton's "I Bet You" on their sophomore effort, ABC (1970). The burgeoning sounds coming out of Philly were having a similarly sizable impact, as evidenced by the addition of the Thom Bell/William Hart track "Can You Remember," which is one of the album's highlights. Another discernibly affective force was found closer to home, as they also drew on the considerable Motown back catalog with "My Cherie Amour," "Standing in the Shadows of Love," and a powerful reading of "(I Know) I'm Losing You." Under the moniker of "the Corporation," Motown staffers and artists including Bobby Taylor, instrumentalists Deke Richards (guitar), Freddie Perren (keyboard) , and Fonce Mizell (keyboards), and the label's co-founder, Berry Gordy, came up with a handful of dominant originals. Prominent among them are the midtempo "Nobody" and their double-sided chart-topping single "I Want You Back" b/w the Smokey Robinson-penned "Who's Lovin' You." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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R&B - Verschenen op 24 oktober 2000 | Motown

Unquestionably one of the dominant forces of pop music during the '70s and the first supergroup from the second phase of Berry Gordy's Motown heyday, the Jackson 5 amassed a back catalog that only an elite group of Gordy's artists could rival. Previously issued in 2000 under the title Anthology (which, incidentally was a remaster of 1976's greatest-hits compilation of the same name), this collection contains a complete survey of the group's most well-known hits right up to 1976, which is when the group later signed to Epic. There are B-sides, a few live cuts and original LP versions selected over the dance or radio originals. Most die-hard fans of the fellows will be challenged to find anything here they don't already have, but for casual fans looking for all of the hits and then some, this may be the only Jacksons greatest-hits CD you'll ever need in your collection. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Soul - Verschenen op 8 september 1970 | Motown

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During the fall of 1970, pop music lovers remained in the grip of Jackson 5 fever. The quintet's Third Album (1970) continued the trend with another huge crossover smash. Similarly, it followed its two predecessors into the upper echelons of the pop (number four) and R&B (number one) LP surveys. It further mirrored their first two collections by taking a pair of singles into the Top Five with the best-selling ballad "I'll Be There" (number one) and the loose and funky "Mama's Pearl." The latter was credited to "the Corporation," consisting of Bobby Taylor, instrumentalists Deke Richards (guitar), Freddie Perren (keyboard), Fonce Mizell (keyboards), and Motown founder Berry Gordy. Together, they had tailored the Jackson 5 to reflect the unmistakable Motown sound, expanding just enough to incorporate other significant influences as well. From the Thom Bell/William Hart Philly soul songbook comes the non-Motor City highlight "Ready or Not Here I Come (Can't Hide from Love)" -- a focus track for the Delfonics a year earlier. The update of Smokey Robinson & the Miracles' "The Love I Saw in You Was Just a Mirage" and the midtempo closer, "Darling Dear" (which Robinson and company had concurrently included on their Pocket Full of Miracles LP from 1970), are likewise worthwhile spins. Perhaps not all that coincidentally, both releases also feature tastefully scored arrangements of Paul Simon's "Bridge Over Troubled Water," with the Jacksons' version getting the nod. In addition to being the name of their forthcoming ABC-TV prime time special, "Goin' Back to Indiana" makes its debut appearance here as an upbeat acknowledgment of the Jackson brothers' native stomping grounds. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 oktober 1970 | Motown

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After three consecutive Top Five Pop albums in 1970 alone, it was somewhat of a no-brainer that Motown would want to include a holiday long-player to that list. The Jackson 5's Christmas Album (1970) combines classic favorites as well as a handful of compositions penned by the Corporation. This all-star team of Motown staffers and musicians boasted composer Bobby Taylor, Deke Richards (guitar), Freddie Perren (keyboard), Fonce Mizell (keyboards), and label co-founder Berry Gordy. As they had done for each of the Jackson 5's previous platters, they carefully crafted and significantly modernized familiar seasonal selections. Leading off the effort is an unusual (for a pop act, anyway) two-part interpretation of "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," commencing with a fairly rote reading before kicking into high gear during a fittingly R&B-inspired coda. They follow with an undeniably soulful update of "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town" and the fun and funky "Up on the Rooftop," which also adds instrumental elements of their hit "The Love You Save" with a few bars of "Here Comes Santa Claus" likewise worked into the mix. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" is another standard that has been infused with a fresh spirit, once again yielding a well-chosen and adeptly executed revision. Although not as drastically overhauled, "Frosty the Snowman" and "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" are none the less thoroughly enjoyable. In terms of originals, the lovely "Give Love at Christmas" informed covers by fellow Motown staples the Temptations -- who used the tune as the title track for their 1980 Christmas entry -- Johnny Gill, and even a reggae version by the Tamlins. The Jacksons similarly shared the brisk and upbeat "Someday at Christmas" with the Temptations and Stevie Wonder, as well as Diana Ross, whose take is one of the highlights of her Very Special Season (1998) outing. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Ambient / New Age / Easy Listening - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 1996 | Motown

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Pop - Verschenen op 12 april 1971 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Maybe Tomorrow (1971) was the Jackson 5's fourth long-player in less than two years, actually their fifth if you count the excellent holiday offering The Christmas Album (1970). Tito, Jermaine, Marlon, Randy, and Michael continue their prolific run, building off the same combination of swooning slow jams and funky rockers that had catapulted their previous outings into the Top Five R&B and Pop Album surveys. No doubt influenced by the recent success of "I'll Be There," the tunes extracted as singles were the heartfelt and Michael-led ballads "Never Can Say Goodbye," as well as the title track "Maybe Tomorrow." Although the youngest member of the Jackson 5, he consistently turned in precociously age-defying performances. Once again, Motown's self-inclusive team of Bobby Taylor, instrumentalists Deke Richards (guitar), Freddie Perren (keyboard), Fonce Mizell (keyboards), and the label's co-founder Berry Gordy -- known collectively as the Corporation -- supplied a majority of the grooves. However, it was increasingly the tunes brought in from elsewhere that were gaining the most attention. Actor/composer/performer Clifton Davis supplied "Never Can Say Goodbye," while Hal Davis' midtempo arrangement of the Crests' 1958 hit "16 Candles" is a perfect vehicle for Jermaine. He would return to his R&B ancestry for a significant solo side, a cover of Shep & the Limelites' "Daddy's Home." Standouts from the Corporation's contributions are the fun, though admittedly lightweight "My Little Baby," the harder driving "It's Great to Be Here" and the upbeat funk vibe "I Will Find a Way" that concludes the platter. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 29 maart 1973 | Motown

The Jackson 5 slipped a bit with this album, although they still had two pop and R&B hits. But it wasn't anywhere near as dominant or popular an album as their earlier ones and wound up being one of their final three releases for Motown. They later did some recording with Stevie Wonder, Michael cut some solo material, and everyone except Jermaine headed for Columbia. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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R&B - Verschenen op 1 januari 1971 | Motown

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R&B - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | UNI - MOTOWN

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R&B - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | UNI - MOTOWN

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R&B - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | UNI - MOTOWN

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R&B - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | UNI - MOTOWN

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R&B - Verschenen op 18 december 1969 | UNI - MOTOWN

Less than two weeks before the 1960s were left to be deciphered in the history books, Motown unleashed Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5 (1969) and in doing so fittingly marked the beginning of a new era in crossover pop and soul. For all intents and purposes, this dozen-song disc introduced the world to the sibling talents of Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon, and most significantly of all, a prepubescent powerhouse named Michael Jackson. The brothers' inextricably tight vocal harmonies were fueled by the ebullience of youth and inexperience while the flames of their collective success were stoked with the funkified vibe of urban America. Immediately evident is the influence that Sly & the Family Stone (whose "Stand!" is an unmitigated zenith in the Jackson 5's care), James Brown, and even Funkadelic had on the J5. In fact, the quintet would actually cover George Clinton's "I Bet You" on their sophomore effort, ABC (1970). The burgeoning sounds coming out of Philly were having a similarly sizable impact, as evidenced by the addition of the Thom Bell/William Hart track "Can You Remember," which is one of the album's highlights. Another discernibly affective force was found closer to home, as they also drew on the considerable Motown back catalog with "My Cherie Amour," "Standing in the Shadows of Love," and a powerful reading of "(I Know) I'm Losing You." Under the moniker of "the Corporation," Motown staffers and artists including Bobby Taylor, instrumentalists Deke Richards (guitar), Freddie Perren (keyboard) , and Fonce Mizell (keyboards), and the label's co-founder, Berry Gordy, came up with a handful of dominant originals. Prominent among them are the midtempo "Nobody" and their double-sided chart-topping single "I Want You Back" b/w the Smokey Robinson-penned "Who's Lovin' You." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Soul - Verschenen op 19 januari 2010 | Essential Media Group

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R&B - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | Hip-O Select

Soul - Verschenen op 13 november 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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R&B - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | Universal Music Group International