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Country - Verschenen op 1 juli 1975 | CMCapNash (N91)

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Glen Campbell, who spent his life building a sturdy bridge between country and pop, was above all a voice. A voice as iconic as those of Frank Sinatra, Elvis or Ella Fitzgerald. In 1975 when Rhinestone Cowboy was released, the well-coiffed Arkansas-born singer who also hosted a weekly talk show on CBS was showered with golden records and Grammy Awards. This 13th album, which begins with the single of the same name, was one of his most popular records. Rhinestones Cowboy launched Campbell right back up to the top of the charts, after he deserted them for a while at the beginning of the ‘70s. Thanks to the Dennis Lambert-Brian Potter producing duo, who wrote the first four songs on the album, Glen Campbell tapped into all his know-how and embodied a country boy who had come to town to do the impossible, perfectly crooning down the mic without ever turning his songs into schmaltzy tear-jerkers. Here, he covers hits by the likes of Smokey Robinson (My Girl), Randy Newman (Marie) and Barry Mann (We're Over) while never copying their styles. It was in this slightly kitschy territory, situated somewhere between country, pop, folk and soft rock, that Campbell ruled supreme. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Country - Verschenen op 21 juli 2019 | CMCapNash (N91)

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Ambient / New Age / Easy Listening - Verschenen op 1 januari 1968 | CMCapNash (N91)

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Country - Verschenen op 1 april 1976 | CMCapNash (N91)

Like its immediate predecessor, Rhinestone Cowboy, 1976's Bloodline is produced by Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter and is something of a very loose concept album, where about half the songs have distinct thematic undercurrents that help bring the record together as a whole. Here, many of the songs address familial situations, whether it's relations between a man and wife or a man and his child. So, the title Bloodline does indeed have significance; even if not every song here fits a particular theme, it certainly has an undercurrent of how a man is tied to his kin, his bloodline. While this record didn't produce crossover hits on the level of "Rhinestone Cowboy" or "Country Boy (You Got Your Feet in LA" -- only the deliberate pop crossover medley of "Don't Pull Your Love/Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye," easily the weakest moment on the record, reached the Top Ten on either the pop or country charts -- Bloodline is in many ways stronger than the Rhinestone Cowboy album, because it follows through its themes better and has a slightly stronger, or at least more consistent, set of songs. Glen Campbell is at his most effective when he's singing songs that are at least tangentially related to the main theme. Take the two tales of fatherhood: The joint custody epic "See You on Sunday," where he says goodbye to his kid for the weekend, is as heart-wrenching as the fatherly advice in "Christiaan No" is moving. But it's not just the songs that flow into the "bloodline" theme that work -- "Everytime I Sing a Love Song" is a lovely ballad and Lambert/Potter's opener, "Baby Don't Be Givin' Me Up," is deceptively cheerful and all the stronger for it. And the same could be said for the album -- it's soothing on the surface, but dig deeper, and real pain can be heard, making Bloodline one of Campbell's most complex, and best, records. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Verschenen op 1 januari 1967 | CMCapNash (N91)

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Country - Verschenen op 1 januari 1980 | CMCapNash (N91)