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Jazz - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | Cam Jazz

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Vocale jazz - Verschenen op 2 oktober 2020 | Verve

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
In 1962, Ella Fitzgerald was at the height of her powers, about midway through recording her now-iconic series of "songbook" albums and, two years earlier, having released a barnstormer of a live album, Ella in Berlin, that solidified her position as one of the most talented and popular musicians working in the jazz idiom. Her only competition at the time was, essentially, Frank Sinatra and herself. During the course of 1962, she would release three albums: two complementary collaborations with Nelson Riddle that further pushed her into crossover territory without tarnishing her credibility or minimizing her skills, and the oft-overlooked Rhythm is My Business, a hard-swinging set that comes off breezy and soulful, but is a remarkable document of the strength of Fitzgerald and her band during this era. And it's that strength that's captured on The Lost Berlin Tapes, recorded in concert at Berlin’s Sportpalast that year. Verve Records founder Norman Granz frequently recorded live sets of many of his acts (Fitzgerald especially), and that's what accounts for both the existence and the remarkable fidelity of these "lost" tapes. (Though they were never truly lost; Granz had just stashed them away). From a performance perspective, it's unbelievable that this concert recording sat unheard for more than a half-century. Brimming with energy and benefiting from the confidence that can only come from being at the top of one's game, Ella and her band careen through 17 songs with a full-throated fervor that's greeted with an equally enthusiastic response from the crowd. The set both swings incredibly hard and evinces a cool, sophisticated polish, a combination that, again, pretty much only she and Sinatra were delivering at this scale during the era. It's the sort of casual excellence that's made to look deceptively easy. (And yes, she aces the version of "Mack the Knife" here.) Releases like this—especially in the aftermath of the devastating Universal fire that destroyed so many iconic album masters and so much unreleased material—prove that, even when we think a barrel has been fully scraped or a vault fully excavated, there will always be warm, welcome surprises to be found in the archives of these legendary artists. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 28 augustus 2020 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 29 mei 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
If Benjamin Moussay’s name ever appeared on any ECM album covers it was always as sideman for Louis Sclavis, on his albums Sources, Silk and Salt on Melodies and Characters on a Wall. But with Promontoire, the 47-year-old has finally released an album for Manfred Eicher’s label that is entirely original solo material. Based in Munich, ECM Records already boasts an impressive number of major solo piano works, including the best-seller Köln Concert by Keith Jarrett, and Promontoire is now one of them. Moussay is a rather unassuming musician on the contemporary jazz scene, but those in the business have always recognised the clarity and strength of his playing. This includes Martial Solal, who said “He plays fair. Not too much, not too little”, but also an enormous list of musicians who have worked with him, including Sclavis, Archie Shepp, Dave Liebmann, Jean François Jenny Clark, Marc Ducret, Daniel Humair, Steve Swallow, Vincent Courtois, Michel Portal, Vincent Peirani, Youn Sun Nah, Airelle Besson and a few dozen others. He often plays in a trio (mainly with Eric Echampard and Arnault Cuisinier) but the solo piano pieces he performs here are timeless, characterised by simplicity, profound lyricism and improvisations with a strong narrative. Sensuality of the string’s vibration illuminating silence. Dance in its essence, solitary, unfolds with the flow of the internal rhythm. Elasticity of time, freedom of action, space, fleeting pleasure…Writing, infinitely reshuffling pretexts to the discretion of the instant. (…) Playing solo piano, I know the starting point and the destination. Mystery lies in the surprises of the journey”. This vision is a theme that flows throughout the twelve tracks on this album, which reveals a little more of itself with every listen. You can hear influences from all of his favourite musicians, from Thelonious Monk and Claudio Arrau to Lennie Tristano and Paul Bley, appearing and then disappearing before the melody takes over once again. Moussay always generates strong imagery with his melodies as he also composes music for film and theatre, but his work never sounds like music that has been churned out quickly without much thought or meaning behind it. Promontoire is particularly impressive during the more simplistic sequences (Villefranque and Monte Perdido), where Benjamin Moussay seems to say it all in just a few notes. This album proves that Less is more, yet again… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 20 maart 2020 | Neuklang

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 28 februari 2020 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 14 februari 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Having moved to New York like a great many Israeli jazz artists, Oded Tzur quickly established his unique tenor saxophone for a simple reason. His teacher was not a player of the instrument, but was none other than the ultimate master of the bansuri flute Hariprasad Chaurasia. By exploring the subtleties of classical Indian music and ragas, the Tel Aviv native was able to build his knowledge of jazz differently. For his arrival on ECM, Oded Tzur joined forces with pianist Nitai Hershkovits, double bassist Petros Klampanis and drummer Jonathan Blake. Each theme on Here Be Dragons presents itself as a sort of mini raga developing over a moving bass and playing on the juxtaposition of two very different musical concepts. “The dialogue between these dimensions takes us wherever it takes us,” details the saxophonist. “For me, the raga is a universal concept. I hear its connection to synagogue prayers or to the blues -- a marvellous creation -- and to music all around the world.” This is a vision he shares with his three colleagues who are all on the same wavelength as him. The level of restraint, the accuracy of the interventions and the talent of manipulating silence are the most impressive on this record, as Tzur easily avoids the contemplative and self-indulging traps. The depth of his sound even allows him to create a rather captivating narrative. The blissful singing appears to invite you to a journey within. This is a sublime album which finishes with a rather surprising cover of Can’t Help Falling In Love by Elvis. With no gimmicks, Oded Tzur makes the King’s iconic hit his own and thus completes his grandiose entry to Manfred Eicher’s label with a cheeky wink. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 31 januari 2020 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Vocale jazz - Verschenen op 24 januari 2020 | Rue bleue

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
There's no doubt about the "Joy" in Joy Ascension. Macha Gharibian is radiant and vivacious as never before in this, her third album. The Armenian pianist and singer has long been blending genres with a divine refinement, sidestepping the stodgy mass of jazz'n'world clichés. With jazz and improvisation as its backbone, wreathed around with Armenian folk music, the album takes an almost poppy approach to some melodies and draws on oriental sounds, deep and growling incantations – always uniting these disparate elements with ease and finesse. Her education in classical piano and her studies alongside Ravi Coltrane, Craig Taborn, Jason Moran and Andy Milne equipped her to create a very original, nomadic jazz that comes in both vocal and instrumental flavours. This time, with the help of an exceptional rhythm section made up of Belgian drummer Dré Pallemaerts and the Canadian Chris Jennings on the double bass, the borders of her musical world have expanded to take in groove (as in the funky Fight) and incantatory fury (Freedom Nine Dance). All the same, Bert Joris's trumpet can still add something to the magnificence of the ballad The Woman I Am Longing to Be and Artyom Minasyan's duduk can transcend the already-semi-mystical force of Sarí Siroun Yar. Add in a beautiful and well-conceived cover of Paul Simon's classic 50 Ways To Leave Your Lover punctuated by some sparks flying from Fender Rhodes – and Macha Ghabarian has created a dense and winning record that cements her standing as a charmingly unique figure on the modern jazz scene. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Wagram Music - 3ème Bureau

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Yesun demonstrates the artistic development of one of the most gifted pianists on the planet. The Cuban Roberto Fonseca embarked on his magical journey at an early age, learning drums at the age of four and starting piano when he was eight. Fonesca was involved with the Buena Vista Social Club, taking over from Ruben Gonzalez on piano and accompanying Ibrahim Ferrer and Omara Portuando. He has also toured with Mayra Andrade (from Cape Verde) and Fatoumata Diawara (from Mali), experiences which have - alongside his natural curiosity – inspired him to intertwine the essence of Cuban music and its African sources with those of Western classical music, jazz and urban music (rock, hip-hop, electro...). Yesun is characterised by universalism, which is mediated through elegant compositions, virtuosity and high-flying friends. Ibrahim Maalouf’s trumpet enriches Cachucha, Joe Lavano’s saxophone ignites Vivo, and the suave Cuban rapper Danay Suárez makes Cadenas thoroughly enchanting.Like a chameleon (one that is sensitive and alert), Roberto Fonseca moves from the great Fazoli piano to electric pianos (Clavinet, Rhodes, Wurlitzer), synths (Moog, Prophet) and percussion, from congas to the mic. He pays tribute to soul (Motown), Cuban music (Aggua, Mambo pa la niña, Clave) and European romanticism (Por Ti) where his piano is sumptuously tender. Supported by drummer Raúl Herrera and double bassist Yandy Martínez-Rodriguez, Fonseca’s playing is precise, bright and completely inimitable. © Benjamin MiNiMuM/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 27 september 2019 | Yellowbird Records

Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 6 september 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Piano and trumpet duets are relatively rare. In 1928, while recording Weather Bird, Louis Armstrong and Earl Hines kicked things off, followed much later by Chet Baker and Paul Bley (with Diane in 1985), Tom Harrell and Jacky Terrasson (Moon and Sand in 1991), Martial Solal and Eric le Lann (Portrait in Black and White in 2000), Martial Solal and Dave Douglas (Rue de Seine in 2006), Uri Caine and Paolo Fresu (Things in 2006), Enrico Rava and Stefano Bollani (Rava Plays Rava in 1999 and The Third Man in 2007), Oscar Peterson on five albums (with Dizzy Gillespie, Roy Eldridge, Clark Terry, Jon Faddis and Harry “Sweets” Edison), Clark Terry’s One On One in 2000 (with fourteen different pianists!) and, most recently, Vijay Iyer and Wadada Leo Smith (A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke in 2016)... Avishai Cohen and Yonathan Avishai have known each other since their teens in Tel Aviv. The pianist even featured on the trumpeter’s two ECM albums, Into the Silence and Cross My Palm With Silver. Their innate complicity allows them to improvise freely, playfully, and intensely on Playing the Room, their first work as a duo. As the title suggests, the two Israelis also incorporate the room – in this case the Auditorio Stelio Molo RSI studio in Lugano – into their sound and they make full use of its resonant acoustics. They each sign a theme in turn before embarking on an eclectic repertoire by John Coltrane (Cresent), Duke Ellington (Azalea), Abdullah Ibrahim (Kofifi Blue), Ornette Coleman (Dee Dee), Milt Jackson (Ralph’s New Blues), Alexander Argov (Shir Eres) and Stevie Wonder (Sir Duke). And they transform this heterogeneous programme into utterly moving chamber jazz. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 5 april 2019 | NoMadMusic

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Moderne jazz - Verschenen op 15 februari 2019 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Piano/bass/drums trios are like small islands which are deserted in spirit and highly populated in reality. And jazz pianists can’t help but keep coming back to visit! Some even live there all year round. For Yaron Herman, playing as a trio means "freedom with constraints": make something new out of something old, don't simply copy the big names (Bill Evans, Keith Jarrett, Ahmad Jamal...), bend the rules by staying within them and, most importantly, have something to say. The Franco-Israeli jazzman is fully aware of the difficulty and ambiguity of the task. "As a trio, it is not easy to find new things, to make a melody sing, to come up with something moving or illuminating, to place yourself in space, sound and improvisation."Nine years after Follow the White Rabbit, Herman decided to "go back to basics" with this trio album. Songs of the Degrees won’t leave you indifferent. With drummer Ziv Ravitz (who has been by his side on his four previous records) and the Iranian-American double bassist Sam Minaie (Charlie Haden's former student who has worked extensively with Tigran Hamasyan) he has found a rhythmic dream team who understand his compositions perfectly. They are compositions that are reinforced with melodies that you’ll be whistling all day long, the kind that remain imprinted in your brain. What’s more, Yaron Herman displays his flair for the exceptional use of space and silence. It’s in those moments that his playing reaches an organic simplicity that makes Songs of the Degrees one of his most engaging albums yet. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 11 januari 2019 | JMS Productions

Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
91 years old and still loves... to play? On his album Improvised Stories (Words and Music), Martial Solal shows us the rules of the game, the rules of his game: "I improvised about twenty pieces, rather short ones, each one inspired by a name or a few words written on 52 small squares of paper picked out of a hat. All I had to do was close my eyes and pick one, and that would be my starting point. The whole thing was recorded in a single take, which explains why there are some repetitions and some wild, unexpected pieces... I played the same way I would at home in the morning, just wandering around on the keyboard."The result shows how Solal is a modest master of jazz piano, or just the piano full stop. Each piece lasting from one to five minutes, these delicious sequences don’t only tell the story of a musician, a city, an instrument, a track or whatever, but most of all the story of Solal himself. And as usual with his recordings, some of his younger colleagues would be wise to listen to these wonderfully fresh and incredibly intelligent improvisations. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 5 oktober 2018 | Universal Music Distribution Deal

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Vocale jazz - Verschenen op 29 juni 2018 | Blue Note

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 6 april 2018 | Sony Music Classical Local

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama - Qobuzism
They knew what they were doing when they named this record Nordub. Nor for North, represented here by Nils Petter Molvaer. In 1997, when the label ECM brought out the stunning album Khmer, this Norwegian trumpeter shook the jazz world by bringing electronic music into his atmospheric musical world. Nor is also his fellow countryman, guitarist Eivind Aarset and Finnish electro-tinkerer and DJ Vladislav Delay. As for the three letters of Dub, they stand for the genre's most classic duo: Sly Dunbar on drums and bassist Robbie Shakespeare. In 2016, this motley crew made up of the Jamaican tandem and Nils Petter Molvaer hit the stage. It was quite a warm-up for their studio session in Oslo. In essence, Molvaer's world has always been a hybrid, bringing together textures that were never exclusively jazz. His playing style uses different atmospheric controls without ever losing the creative strength of his improvisations or compositions. Here, the trumpeter even works his way into the unique Sly & Robbie sound with a perfectly natural air. And that is surely the strength of Nordub. No-one takes over, or tries to overpower the other. The fusion is total, and sincere. We even feel that our two old Jamaican long-distance travellers have strayed out of their normal comfort zone to take part actively in this music as it takes shape. Just like Aarset and Delay's work, every part is a vital component of the final result. Together, our five sound adventurers produce a fine symphony of truly singular dub and jazz. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 9 maart 2018 | Intuition

Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Better than knowing how to do it all, or rather play it all, Martial Solal knows how to make things his own. Whether he’s winding his way through the wonderful classics (Body & Soul or Night & Day) or following in Mozart’s footsteps for Marche Turque, he performs every composition in his own way. In this exercise of taking apart and rebuilding standards (his latest craze it seems), Solal remains unmatched. Even at 91 years old! In 2017, he sat down next to his Steinway in the Gütersloh en Rhénanie-du-Nord-Westphalie theatre and brought the audience a new thrilling world tour. This collection is anything but a walk down nostalgia lane, orchestrated by his agile fingers with a constantly renewed inventiveness. In short, some of his younger colleagues would do well to take note of this hour of fresh musical frenzy… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 29 september 2017 | Legacy Recordings

Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
Thelonious Monk was 34 years old when he crossed the Atlantic for the first time. In that year of 1954, the American pianist, already considered a great trend-setter, was the guest of the Jazz Festival that takes place at the Salle Pleyel where he performed with drummer Jean-Louis Viale and bass player Jean-Marie Ingrand. This album released in 2017, Monk’s centennial year, offers the recording of five titles from this performance, but its true value lies elsewhere: Thelonious Monk solo on piano, that producer André Francis was wise enough to record. Even wiser since the musician had never been recorded solo before. And it’s like fireworks! Listening to such music blending chaos and passion, humor and intelligence is like watching a tightrope walker on the edge but of course never falling. And let’s not forget the genius of the compositions! All of Monk's art is already there, in this Parisian walk of 1954 that still sounds as modern as it did many decades ago… © MZ/Qobuz

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