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Jazz - Verschenen op 13 maart 2020 | Transversales Disques

Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Free jazz & Avant-garde jazz - Verschenen op 25 januari 2019 | Resonance Records

Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Experts in quality archives, Resonance Records, have dug up an essential Eric Dolphy gem. After leaving Prestige/New Jazz Records, the saxophonist worked during the summer of ‘63 with producer Alan Douglas (famous not only for his recordings with Jimi Hendrix but also for being behind the glass for the album Money Jungle with Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Max Roach). This meeting resulted in two albums: Iron Man and Conversations. The sessions were concocted with the crème de la crème of avant-garde jazz at that time: William "Prince" Lasha on flute, Huey "Sonny" Simmons on alto saxophone, Clifford Jordan on soprano saxophone, Woody Shaw on trumpet, Garvin Bushell on bassoon, Bobby Hutcherson on vibraphone, Richard Davis and Eddie Kahn on double bass and J.C. Moses and Charles Moffett on drums. Fast forward to January 2019: all the sessions from 1st and 3rd June 1963 have resurfaced, including some alternate takes. The tapes had been stored in a suitcase by Dolphy himself with other personal belongings just before he flew off on his last European tour, during which he died in Berlin on June 29th 1964 at the age of 36. The Californian had entrusted the suitcase to friends. Years later, it was recovered by flautist James Newton, who went through its content with Zev Feldman from Resonance Records and the pundits of the Eric Dolphy Trust in Los Angeles. With two and a half hours of music, Musical Prophet is a major document in Eric Dolphy's artistic evolution. A recording comparable to Out To Lunch!, his masterpiece for Blue Note released seven months later. But this is by no means a draft. Here, the group embark on trails both well-trodden and unexplored. Without cutting themselves off from their elders (Jitterbug Waltz by Fats Waller opens the album), they blow hot and cold and dare to explore all posibilities. Depending on the weapon of choice (alto saxophone, flute or bass clarinet), Dolphy expresses different qualities. Melancholic and introspective, almost as if irritated, if not panicky, he is constantly matched by accomplices who are just as quick as he is. And the musical freedom never erases the melodic framework. 56 years later, this emerging jazz has not lost any of its spontaneity and it would easily make some 2019 productions obsolete... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 29 juni 2018 | Impulse!

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Reissue - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Jazz - Verschenen op 23 maart 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
When you see the names Miles Davis and John Coltrane on the same poster, you feel a shiver down your spine. This sixth instalment of the trumpet player's Bootleg Series that shiver grows – to put it euphemistically – to ecstasy. The Final Tour concentrates on the final chapter of the collaboration between Miles and Coltrane. On four CDs, it takes in performances recorded as part of their 1960 European tour – their last outing together before the saxophonist's death in July 1967. It includes both concerts at the Paris Olympia of 21 March 1960, the two concerts of 22 March in Stockholm, and of 24 March in Copenhagen, all available for the first time on a format other than quarter-inch tape. These five concerts take place about a year after the release of the masterpiece Kind of Blue, which shook the jazz world to its core. Our protagonists' nuclear creative power threaten the quintet with catastrophe at every turn. With pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Jimmy Cobb, Miles and Trane deliver torrential improvisations in which fusion and opposition battle it out. But miraculously, it all holds together. And how! It's the magic of these five concerts: hearing the five giants all at once, and their ability to match each other's pace, and roar in unison. In terms of the repertoire, this box set is a kind of davisian nirvana: it holds all the greatest themes (not always his own) which made the trumpeter's name: ’Round Midnight, Bye Bye Blackbird, On Green Dolphin Street, Walkin’, All Of You, Oleo, So What and All Blues… Finally, The Final Tour finishes on a jaw-dropping interview given by Coltrane to the Swedish DJ Carl-Erik Lindgren. "Do you feel angry?," asks Lindgren. "No, I don't," says Trane. "I was talking to a fellow the other day, and I told him, the reason I play so many sounds, maybe it sounds angry, I'm trying so many things at one time. I haven't sorted them out." Listening to these 1960 concerts, we can only respond: long live confusion! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Free jazz & Avant-garde jazz - Verschenen op 22 september 2014 | Strut

Onderscheidingen Sélection JAZZ NEWS - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Jazz - Verschenen op 21 maart 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 1974 | Milestone

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Right between post bop and hard bop, Joe Henderson made a name for himself in the 1960s with five brilliant albums as the leader for Blue Note Records. Like a lot of his peers at the end of that decade, the saxophonist wanted to shake up the genre’s rules and dabble in a certain form of avant-garde. Recorded in October 1973 in Los Angeles and released by Milestone Records the following year, The Elements is one of the fruits of this pursuit of elsewhere jazz. As its title suggests the album is divided in four parts, logically called Fire, Air, Water and Earth, in which Henserson embarked on improvisation segments with renowned adventurers, such as Alice Coltrane on piano and harp, violinist Michael White, bass player Charlie Haden, drummer Leon “Ndugu” Chancler and percussionists Kenneth Nash and Baba Duru Oshun. Overall a gang of sound hunters more inspired than ever, who dare to lose themselves in latino and Indians sounds. This libertarian multi-layered jazz and world music, like countless others at that time, was more than anything else the product of extremely focused and engaged musicians, attentively listening to each other. It’s that engagement that placed these Elements way above the fray… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
HI-RES€ 15,49
CD€ 10,99

Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 1974 | Milestone

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Right between post bop and hard bop, Joe Henderson made a name for himself in the 1960s with five brilliant albums as the leader for Blue Note Records. Like a lot of his peers at the end of that decade, the saxophonist wanted to shake up the genre’s rules and dabble in a certain form of avant-garde. Recorded in October 1973 in Los Angeles and released by Milestone Records the following year, The Elements is one of the fruits of this pursuit of elsewhere jazz. As its title suggests the album is divided in four parts, logically called Fire, Air, Water and Earth, in which Henserson embarked on improvisation segments with renowned adventurers, such as Alice Coltrane on piano and harp, violinist Michael White, bass player Charlie Haden, drummer Leon “Ndugu” Chancler and percussionists Kenneth Nash and Baba Duru Oshun. Overall a gang of sound hunters more inspired than ever, who dare to lose themselves in latino and Indians sounds. This libertarian multi-layered jazz and world music, like countless others at that time, was more than anything else the product of extremely focused and engaged musicians, attentively listening to each other. It’s that engagement that placed these Elements way above the fray… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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Jazz in het magazine
  • Wallace Roney: a legend leaves us
    Wallace Roney: a legend leaves us Commended by Miles Davis at the start of the 1990s, the great American trumpeter succumbs to the Covid-19 coronavirus.
  • Avishai Cohen: This Time It's Different
    Avishai Cohen: This Time It's Different With his group Big Vicious, the Israeli trumpeter incorporates electronic and atmospheric music into his jazz, and even covers Massive Attack's "Teardrop"!
  • Here Comes Al Di Meola
    Here Comes Al Di Meola 7 years after a first volume, the American guitar player releases a new album entirely dedicated to Beatles covers!
  • Shabaka Hutchings: past, present and future
    Shabaka Hutchings: past, present and future The British saxophonist teams up with South African collective The Ancestors to deliver a whirlwind album that is as politicall minded as it is mad.
  • Bird flies away...
    Bird flies away... It's been 65 years since the world of jazz lost one of their legends.
  • McCoy Tyner: pianist supreme
    McCoy Tyner: pianist supreme One of the greatest pianists in the history of jazz, a member of the John Coltrane quartet, passed away on March 6th 2020.
  • Charles Lloyd, still going strong
    Charles Lloyd, still going strong Lyrical, spiritual and free, the live recording of the great American saxophonist's 80th birthday celebration has just been released on Blue Note...
  • Oded Tzur: intercontinental sax
    Oded Tzur: intercontinental sax The New York-based Israeli saxophonist released his new album "Here Be Dragons" on Munich label ECM, and drew inspiration from concepts of Indian music... a globe-trotting trip!
  • Moses Boyd: a magician on the drumset
    Moses Boyd: a magician on the drumset The London based jazz drummer is the latest recipient of our Qobuzissime award. His new album "Dark Matter" is yet another piece of proof that the New British Jazz Scene shows no signs of slowing d...
  • Nina Simone turning up the pressure...
    Nina Simone turning up the pressure... Recorded on stage at Carnegie Hall in 1964, this "In Concert" has been re-released in Hi-Res 24 Bit quality. In 2020 it resounds just as powerfully as it did back then.