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Jazz - Verschenen op 29 mei 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
If Benjamin Moussay’s name ever appeared on any ECM album covers it was always as sideman for Louis Sclavis, on his albums Sources, Silk and Salt on Melodies and Characters on a Wall. But with Promontoire, the 47-year-old has finally released an album for Manfred Eicher’s label that is entirely original solo material. Based in Munich, ECM Records already boasts an impressive number of major solo piano works, including the best-seller Köln Concert by Keith Jarrett, and Promontoire is now one of them. Moussay is a rather unassuming musician on the contemporary jazz scene, but those in the business have always recognised the clarity and strength of his playing. This includes Martial Solal, who said “He plays fair. Not too much, not too little”, but also an enormous list of musicians who have worked with him, including Sclavis, Archie Shepp, Dave Liebmann, Jean François Jenny Clark, Marc Ducret, Daniel Humair, Steve Swallow, Vincent Courtois, Michel Portal, Vincent Peirani, Youn Sun Nah, Airelle Besson and a few dozen others. He often plays in a trio (mainly with Eric Echampard and Arnault Cuisinier) but the solo piano pieces he performs here are timeless, characterised by simplicity, profound lyricism and improvisations with a strong narrative. Sensuality of the string’s vibration illuminating silence. Dance in its essence, solitary, unfolds with the flow of the internal rhythm. Elasticity of time, freedom of action, space, fleeting pleasure…Writing, infinitely reshuffling pretexts to the discretion of the instant. (…) Playing solo piano, I know the starting point and the destination. Mystery lies in the surprises of the journey”. This vision is a theme that flows throughout the twelve tracks on this album, which reveals a little more of itself with every listen. You can hear influences from all of his favourite musicians, from Thelonious Monk and Claudio Arrau to Lennie Tristano and Paul Bley, appearing and then disappearing before the melody takes over once again. Moussay always generates strong imagery with his melodies as he also composes music for film and theatre, but his work never sounds like music that has been churned out quickly without much thought or meaning behind it. Promontoire is particularly impressive during the more simplistic sequences (Villefranque and Monte Perdido), where Benjamin Moussay seems to say it all in just a few notes. This album proves that Less is more, yet again… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Moderne jazz - Verschenen op 24 april 2020 | Heavenly Sweetness

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Moderne jazz - Verschenen op 27 maart 2020 | Mélodie en sous-sol

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Jazz - Verschenen op 20 maart 2020 | Neuklang

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Jazz - Verschenen op 28 februari 2020 | Blue Note Records

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Moderne jazz - Verschenen op 14 februari 2020 | Exodus Records

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama - Qobuzism
The new British jazz scene seems to be an indefinite source of talent, maintaining its creative flow with this first solo album released by Moses Boyd. Fans of the movement will already know that this eclectic young drummer has played alongside Shabaka Hutchings, Zara McFarlane, Nubya Garcia, Joe Armon-Jones, Theon Cross and Ashley Henry but also that he makes up one half of duo Binker & Moses, the wild project he pursues with saxophonist Binker Golding. The album Dark Matter sees Boyd as more of a producer than a drummer, with a wide narrative detailing who he is and what he represents: a musician dreaming of becoming the next Max Roach or Tony Williams, all while growing up listening to Dizzee Rascal and Wiley as well as more Caribbean style rhythms, reggae and electronic music. The power of Dark Matter comes from the way in which it brings together a huge cast of varied icons to create a single snapshot of today’s London. Rich in sound, the album’s DNA is made up of jazz but takes us on a journey from afrobeat (BTB) to dubstep (2 Far Gone) before a detour via post-rock (What Now?). With the voices of Poppy Ajudha, Obongjayar and Nonku Phiri and double bass from the ex-Jazz Warrior Gary Crosby, Moses Boyd has created an orgy of off-the-wall rhythms. An album even more unclassifiable than those made by his friends of the same UK jazz scene. Invigorating. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 14 februari 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Having moved to New York like a great many Israeli jazz artists, Oded Tzur quickly established his unique tenor saxophone for a simple reason. His teacher was not a player of the instrument, but was none other than the ultimate master of the bansuri flute Hariprasad Chaurasia. By exploring the subtleties of classical Indian music and ragas, the Tel Aviv native was able to build his knowledge of jazz differently. For his arrival on ECM, Oded Tzur joined forces with pianist Nitai Hershkovits, double bassist Petros Klampanis and drummer Jonathan Blake. Each theme on Here Be Dragons presents itself as a sort of mini raga developing over a moving bass and playing on the juxtaposition of two very different musical concepts. “The dialogue between these dimensions takes us wherever it takes us,” details the saxophonist. “For me, the raga is a universal concept. I hear its connection to synagogue prayers or to the blues -- a marvellous creation -- and to music all around the world.” This is a vision he shares with his three colleagues who are all on the same wavelength as him. The level of restraint, the accuracy of the interventions and the talent of manipulating silence are the most impressive on this record, as Tzur easily avoids the contemplative and self-indulging traps. The depth of his sound even allows him to create a rather captivating narrative. The blissful singing appears to invite you to a journey within. This is a sublime album which finishes with a rather surprising cover of Can’t Help Falling In Love by Elvis. With no gimmicks, Oded Tzur makes the King’s iconic hit his own and thus completes his grandiose entry to Manfred Eicher’s label with a cheeky wink. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 31 januari 2020 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 24 januari 2020 | Rue bleue

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
There's no doubt about the "Joy" in Joy Ascension. Macha Gharibian is radiant and vivacious as never before in this, her third album. The Armenian pianist and singer has long been blending genres with a divine refinement, sidestepping the stodgy mass of jazz'n'world clichés. With jazz and improvisation as its backbone, wreathed around with Armenian folk music, the album takes an almost poppy approach to some melodies and draws on oriental sounds, deep and growling incantations – always uniting these disparate elements with ease and finesse. Her education in classical piano and her studies alongside Ravi Coltrane, Craig Taborn, Jason Moran and Andy Milne equipped her to create a very original, nomadic jazz that comes in both vocal and instrumental flavours. This time, with the help of an exceptional rhythm section made up of Belgian drummer Dré Pallemaerts and the Canadian Chris Jennings on the double bass, the borders of her musical world have expanded to take in groove (as in the funky Fight) and incantatory fury (Freedom Nine Dance). All the same, Bert Joris's trumpet can still add something to the magnificence of the ballad The Woman I Am Longing to Be and Artyom Minasyan's duduk can transcend the already-semi-mystical force of Sarí Siroun Yar. Add in a beautiful and well-conceived cover of Paul Simon's classic 50 Ways To Leave Your Lover punctuated by some sparks flying from Fender Rhodes – and Macha Ghabarian has created a dense and winning record that cements her standing as a charmingly unique figure on the modern jazz scene. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 8 november 2019 | JMS Productions

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Wagram Music - 3ème Bureau

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Yesun demonstrates the artistic development of one of the most gifted pianists on the planet. The Cuban Roberto Fonseca embarked on his magical journey at an early age, learning drums at the age of four and starting piano when he was eight. Fonesca was involved with the Buena Vista Social Club, taking over from Ruben Gonzalez on piano and accompanying Ibrahim Ferrer and Omara Portuando. He has also toured with Mayra Andrade (from Cape Verde) and Fatoumata Diawara (from Mali), experiences which have - alongside his natural curiosity – inspired him to intertwine the essence of Cuban music and its African sources with those of Western classical music, jazz and urban music (rock, hip-hop, electro...). Yesun is characterised by universalism, which is mediated through elegant compositions, virtuosity and high-flying friends. Ibrahim Maalouf’s trumpet enriches Cachucha, Joe Lavano’s saxophone ignites Vivo, and the suave Cuban rapper Danay Suárez makes Cadenas thoroughly enchanting.Like a chameleon (one that is sensitive and alert), Roberto Fonseca moves from the great Fazoli piano to electric pianos (Clavinet, Rhodes, Wurlitzer), synths (Moog, Prophet) and percussion, from congas to the mic. He pays tribute to soul (Motown), Cuban music (Aggua, Mambo pa la niña, Clave) and European romanticism (Por Ti) where his piano is sumptuously tender. Supported by drummer Raúl Herrera and double bassist Yandy Martínez-Rodriguez, Fonseca’s playing is precise, bright and completely inimitable. © Benjamin MiNiMuM/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Onze Heures Onze

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 27 september 2019 | Yellowbird Records

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Moderne jazz - Verschenen op 20 september 2019 | Gaya Music Production

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Samy Thiébault’s talent feels like it’s not given the credit it deserves. Granted, he’s a likeable saxophone virtuoso, but there are plenty of those: he’s also a great musician! Ambitious as he is brilliant, every new discographic project of his only goes to confirm his talent. This time around, Thiébault took inspiration from the banks of the river Ganges. But Symphonic Tales is not just a mixture of jazz and raga: he outright transposes this blend onto the strings of the Orchestre symphonique de Bretagne conducted by Aurélien Azan Zielinski. The India that the Frenchman is portraying here is not from 2019 but rather a version from a story or Bollywood superproduction from the 1950s. With Adrien Chicot on the piano, Sylvain Romano on the double bass, Philippe Soirat on drums and Mossin Kawa on the tablas, the jazz player is well surrounded. Thiébault’s jazz has never made do with being just another worthy heir to the holy trinity of saxophonists (John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, Wayne Shorter). With even more conviction than his previous albums, Samy Thiébault grabs his listeners by the hand to guarantee their presence on his abundant journey of sound. Perhaps he’s dreaming of playing like a modern Duke Ellington, whose 1972 Greatest Hits can be seen lying out in a corner on one of the images in the album’s booklet. Just like with Duke, Thiébault’s music allows us to travel through the music, and once the album is over, solid ground seems light years away. A guaranteed intoxicating trip. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 13 september 2019 | Jazz Village

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Remarkably, at 89 years young, pianist Ahmad Jamal is still making fine records. Imbued with sage experience and erudite taste, Jamal has an unerring sense of what still moves him and what he still wants to express. Though nowhere near the late career masterpiece of his 2016 release Marseille these mostly solo outtakes—recorded during that album's sessions—are very personal snapshots of the moment rather than any artistic statement. Ballades is Jamal noodling; his still fantastic touch on the keys and elastic blending of melody and rhythm make it worth a listen. The pianist, who first gained fame in 1958 with the release of At the Pershing, opens this set with a spacious solo take of Marseille's title track. A wry, relaxed version of "Poinciana" unfolds from his long connection to this signature tune. He's joined by longtime bassist James Cammack on three tracks, including an effective mashup between Rodgers & Hart's "Spring is Here" and Bill Evans' "Your Story." For those seeking undeniable evidence of Jamal's still vital genius there's the spontaneously composed and recorded "Because I Love You." The shimmering version of the Johnny Mercer/Johnny Mandel song, "Emily" which closes the album is a classic example of the unbridled imagination and formidable instrumental chops that Jamal can bring when playing by, and one suspects, for himself. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 6 september 2019 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Piano and trumpet duets are relatively rare. In 1928, while recording Weather Bird, Louis Armstrong and Earl Hines kicked things off, followed much later by Chet Baker and Paul Bley (with Diane in 1985), Tom Harrell and Jacky Terrasson (Moon and Sand in 1991), Martial Solal and Eric le Lann (Portrait in Black and White in 2000), Martial Solal and Dave Douglas (Rue de Seine in 2006), Uri Caine and Paolo Fresu (Things in 2006), Enrico Rava and Stefano Bollani (Rava Plays Rava in 1999 and The Third Man in 2007), Oscar Peterson on five albums (with Dizzy Gillespie, Roy Eldridge, Clark Terry, Jon Faddis and Harry “Sweets” Edison), Clark Terry’s One On One in 2000 (with fourteen different pianists!) and, most recently, Vijay Iyer and Wadada Leo Smith (A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke in 2016)... Avishai Cohen and Yonathan Avishai have known each other since their teens in Tel Aviv. The pianist even featured on the trumpeter’s two ECM albums, Into the Silence and Cross My Palm With Silver. Their innate complicity allows them to improvise freely, playfully, and intensely on Playing the Room, their first work as a duo. As the title suggests, the two Israelis also incorporate the room – in this case the Auditorio Stelio Molo RSI studio in Lugano – into their sound and they make full use of its resonant acoustics. They each sign a theme in turn before embarking on an eclectic repertoire by John Coltrane (Cresent), Duke Ellington (Azalea), Abdullah Ibrahim (Kofifi Blue), Ornette Coleman (Dee Dee), Milt Jackson (Ralph’s New Blues), Alexander Argov (Shir Eres) and Stevie Wonder (Sir Duke). And they transform this heterogeneous programme into utterly moving chamber jazz. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 6 september 2019 | BMC Records

Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 30 augustus 2019 | ACT Music

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Verschenen op 12 juli 2019 | ODIN

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Moderne jazz - Verschenen op 28 juni 2019 | Hubro

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama

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Jazz in het magazine
  • Wallace Roney: a legend leaves us
    Wallace Roney: a legend leaves us Commended by Miles Davis at the start of the 1990s, the great American trumpeter succumbs to the Covid-19 coronavirus.
  • Avishai Cohen: This Time It's Different
    Avishai Cohen: This Time It's Different With his group Big Vicious, the Israeli trumpeter incorporates electronic and atmospheric music into his jazz, and even covers Massive Attack's "Teardrop"!
  • Here Comes Al Di Meola
    Here Comes Al Di Meola 7 years after a first volume, the American guitar player releases a new album entirely dedicated to Beatles covers!
  • Shabaka Hutchings: past, present and future
    Shabaka Hutchings: past, present and future The British saxophonist teams up with South African collective The Ancestors to deliver a whirlwind album that is as politicall minded as it is mad.
  • Bird flies away...
    Bird flies away... It's been 65 years since the world of jazz lost one of their legends.
  • McCoy Tyner: pianist supreme
    McCoy Tyner: pianist supreme One of the greatest pianists in the history of jazz, a member of the John Coltrane quartet, passed away on March 6th 2020.
  • Charles Lloyd, still going strong
    Charles Lloyd, still going strong Lyrical, spiritual and free, the live recording of the great American saxophonist's 80th birthday celebration has just been released on Blue Note...
  • Oded Tzur: intercontinental sax
    Oded Tzur: intercontinental sax The New York-based Israeli saxophonist released his new album "Here Be Dragons" on Munich label ECM, and drew inspiration from concepts of Indian music... a globe-trotting trip!
  • Moses Boyd: a magician on the drumset
    Moses Boyd: a magician on the drumset The London based jazz drummer is the latest recipient of our Qobuzissime award. His new album "Dark Matter" is yet another piece of proof that the New British Jazz Scene shows no signs of slowing d...
  • Nina Simone turning up the pressure...
    Nina Simone turning up the pressure... Recorded on stage at Carnegie Hall in 1964, this "In Concert" has been re-released in Hi-Res 24 Bit quality. In 2020 it resounds just as powerfully as it did back then.