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Klassiek - Verschenen op 26 maart 2021 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet
“An artistic manifesto for the sovereign imagination of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach” is how Gli Incogniti's inspirational violinist-director Amandine Beyer and violone player Baldomero Barciela describe C. P. E. Bach's six Hamburg symphonies in their forward to this programme recorded in the clean, softly supportive acoustic of Arras theatre; and that summation is spot on. This was a set commissioned in 1773 by Baron van Swieten, an Austrian nobleman of Dutch decent who also financially supported Haydn and Beethoven. An unusually enlightened and musically curious character, Van Swieten accompanied this particular commission with the explicit specification that “no consideration of the difficulties that the performers might experience” should limit Bach's imagination. In other words, in an era during which a composer mostly had to write to the tastes and technical skills of either their wealthy employer or the sheet-music-buying public, C. P. E. Bach was instead given artistic carte blanche to compose exactly the music in his head. The result was a startlingly, fiercely individual and stormy language over which both players and listeners are being thrown a fresh musical curveball every five seconds, whether that's a new succession of extraordinary harmonic modulations, sudden pauses or changes of melodic direction, lightening-fast ensemble passagework, or close juxtaposition of strongly contrasting dynamics or styles. Who knows how the first performances sounded, because all of this would have stretched the ensemble technique and overall musical accomplishment of the day to its limits, and even today still constitutes a finger and brain-twisting challenge. Not that it sounds as though Gli incogniti are being unduly stretched here. Au contraire, they're tossing off even the most virtuosic moments of ensemble writing with cleanly articulated lightness, bounce and precision, with the sharp dynamic contrasts leaping out at you while never feeling uncomfortably exaggerated, and all with an infectiously joyous energy. It's not just in the quicksilver passagework where they shine either. Listen in No. 4 in B minor to the way their central Larghetto ed innocentemente breathes, and its cleverly balanced tension between tender legato courtliness and sudden sombre, angular explosions. Or, if you want to admire both their tone and its capturing, head to the weighted silence of No. 2 in B-flat's central slow movement, to hear the soft, plump roundness of the bass pizzicato sitting against the luminous violins. Further musicological interest comes from Beyer and her team having also thrown in the earlier Symphony in E minor, Wq. 177, which certainly sounds less adventurous than the Hamburg six, but also like an entirely different and wilder beast to Haydn's “Sturm and Drang” symphonies which were being written at the same time – definitive proof that C. P. E. Bach was off on his own path right from the get-go. One further point to make is that, while it's probably fair to say that these intense works are generally best enjoyed just one or two at a time, the delicacy and vim of these readings make them stand up unusually well to listening from start to finish. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Concerten voor cello - Verschenen op 24 maart 2014 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica - Uitzonderlijke Geluidsopnamen - Hi-Res Audio
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Concerten voor cello - Verschenen op 30 maart 2016 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica - Uitzonderlijke Geluidsopnamen
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Concerten voor cello - Verschenen op 18 mei 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
After two albums which met with unanimous critical acclaim all over the world, the Resonanz Ensemble, based in Hamburg, is offering a recording dedicated to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: the Cello Concertos wq. 170 and Wq. 172, respectively from 1750 and 1753, and the Symphonie Wq. 173 of 1741. The listener will immediately note the radical difference in language between the two concertos, written after the death of Bach Senior, and the Symphony, written while he was still alive: the concertos keep their eyes firmly fixed on the nascent classical era, including the "Sturm und Drang" which still lay ahead (in this regard, the Concerto in A Minor which opens the album, full of force and melodic power, is an excellent example), whereas the Symphony takes the final throes of baroque as its point of departure. Cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras and the Resonanz Ensemble offer a crystal-clear reading, conducted by their new musical director in residence, violinist Riccardo Minasi: and coolly resist the vogue – which can be quite intrusive, or even dictatorial or exclusive – for period instruments, which seems to hold that any music before Mozart (and even sometimes Mozart too) may not be played on modern instruments. Queyras, Resonanz and Minasi are all able to make use of stylistic elements gleaned from the fashion for baroque. This is a very fine album, superbly played, which really brings out all the originality of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach. © SM/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 september 2021 | Alpha Classics

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It’s to Johann Sebastian Bach’s wild-child second son, Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach, that Nevermind – flautist Anna Besson, harpsichordist Jean Rondeau, viola da gamba Robin Pharo and viola player Louis Creac’h – have turned for their recording with Alpha Classics; and while there already exist some eminently classy recordings of this repertoire (including from the likes of keyboardists Andreas Staier and Christopher Hogwood and their respective friends), these new readings can stand as tall alongside them as you’d expect from four musicians representing some of the cream of the younger generation’s early music specialists. Carl Philipp’s three Quartets were composed during 1788, the last year of his life, for Sara Itzig-Levy, a Berlin salon owner and keyboard virtuoso who was the favourite pupil of Carl Philipp’s older brother Wilhelm Friedemann, and later Felix Mendelssohn’s great aunt. She and Carl Philipp would have met during his years at the Berlin court of Frederick the Great, where on the one hand he found himself at the centre of one of eighteenth-century Europe’s most cosmopolitan and artistically exciting hubs, but on the other hand was forced to check his personal leanings towards the turbulent “Empfindsamkeit” style (a forerunner of “Sturm und Drang”) in favour of the more conservative galant style beloved of flute-playing Frederick. It was therefore with relief that in 1768 he was able to take up Hamburg’s Director of Music post, and finally begin to compose with more freedom. Yet Itzig-Levy was clearly a contact worth hanging on to. So back to the Quartets – which owe their distinctive timbres to the unusual presence of a viola – and these are meticulously and lovingly scored works, full of the quirky changes of melodic, harmonic and emotional direction that you also hear in his Hamburg Concertos and Symphonies, and clearly penned for connoisseur keyboardist ears that had no desire to play safe. Listen for instance to the keyboard’s unpredictable chromatic wanderings in the G major Quartet’s Adagio. Nevermind themselves then deliciously pick up on the works’ intricate blend of delicate craftmanship and subversiveness, employing a colouristic palette which milks Bach’s cornucopia of textural and emotional twists and turns to the full. Listen to the G major’s opening Allegretto, where they give us fleet-footedly airy dancing spiced by sudden, isolated, lower-register honks. Or the way Rondeau’s harpsichord flourishes in the A minor’s opening Andantino bring to mind little splashes of sparkling water; followed by a central Largo offering up an entirely different sound world of luxuriously long lines and expansive textures. There’s also the pleasure of their tighter-than-tight chamber partnering: heard, for instance, in that aforementioned A minor Andantino as their imitative lines lightly tumble after each other; and overall through the almost improvisatory quality they often achieve. A final tribute to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s keyboard writing is the ensemble’s bookending of the Quartets with a pair of deftly worked transcriptions of two of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s keyboard sonata movements. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Religieuze vocale muziek - Verschenen op 10 februari 2014 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 oktober 2020 | Claves Records

Hi-Res Booklet
C. P. E. Bach and his keyboards für Kenner und Liebhaber allow us to enter into a forgotten world of sound where various keyboard instruments, especially those strings that are struck, mix and mingle, revealing new colours and accents. C. P. E. Bach's work explores this broad expressive palette that enables him to evoke successively, or sometimes abruptly, the affable and tender grace of the songs to the dry anguish of break-ups, joyful liveliness to sad melancholy. With three keyboards - a clavichord, a Pantalon and a fortepiano -, exceptional witnesses of this sensitive and resonant universe, Pierre Goy succeeds in unveiling to us the whole teeming, whimsical and innovative dimension of works imbued with deep humanity, born of the great art and true freedom with which C. P. E. Bach successfully combined improvisation and composition. © Claves Records
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 4 november 2016 | Warner Classics

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 januari 2020 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 april 2020 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 29 maart 2011 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklets Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Uitzonderlijke Geluidsopnamen - Hi-Res Audio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 14 oktober 2016 | Es-Dur

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 oktober 2014 | Es-Dur

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Concerten voor cello - Verschenen op 24 maart 2014 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica - Uitzonderlijke Geluidsopnamen - Hi-Res Audio
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 11 oktober 2019 | Signum Records

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Born in Weimar, Carl Philipp Emanuel (1714-88) was the fifth child and second surviving son of JS Bach and his first wife Maria Barbara. By his own account he had no other teacher for composition and keyboard except his father. Nevertheless, the majority of Emanuel’s earliest works owe more to the influence of Telemann and other exponents of the new galant style, while already suggesting his own progressive instinct. At the age of twenty-four, after seven years studying law, Emanuel decided to devote himself to music. In 1738 he accepted the position of keyboard player at the court of the Prussian crown prince – the future Frederick the Great. After nearly thirty years of royal service he left Berlin and moved to Hamburg, where he occupied the positions of Music Director and Cantor until his death. © Signum Records
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Symfonische muziek - Verschenen op 20 januari 2015 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach was Johann Sebastian Bach’s second and most successful son. He was a transitional figure between the Baroque and the Classicism, and greatly influenced Mozart and Beethoven, partly thanks to his keyboard sonatas. In the 18th century, the cello concerto was still a fairly new genre, and Boccherini and Haydn had not yet written their contributions at the point when C.P.E. Bach completed his, the three concertos written between 1750 and 1753. The tempestuous drama of the openings and the carefree candour of the finales stand in stark contrast to the tenderness and emotional depth of the slow parts. The renowned Belgian cellist Roel Dieltiens and the legendary Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century reveal themselves to be born raconteurs, turning this music into fascinating, colourful stories. The edition includes a beautiful essay by the popular novelist Anna Enquist, a long-time friend of the Orchestra and of the late Frans Brüggen, in which she takes her experience visiting the recording sessions of this album in Amsterdam as a departure point to explore the musical personality of Carl Philipp Emanuel, especially when seen in relation to his father’s “œuvre”. © Glossa
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 juli 2012 | BIS

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 12 februari 2002 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Piano solo - Verschenen op 25 augustus 2017 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik
Alexei Lubimov chose to play these works by CPE Bach on a tangent piano, a very rare keyboard instrument with an unusual sound. From the middle of the eighteenth century the tangent piano became popular because it could offer more a expressive and intense sound than the harpsichord, and thereby could respond to the changes in the Zeitgeist. It is no accident that all three of the great Viennese composers – Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven – named the ‘Hamburg Bach’ (Carl Philip Emanuel Bach), as their model. As he grew into maturity, CPE’s interest in keyboard music increasingly came to hone in on three genres: the fantasy, the rondo and the sonata. The present album is devoted to all three, plus a few lesser pieces to which the composer gave the title solfeggi. Six of the major pieces proposed by Alexei Lubimov are taken from the great collections known as “für Kenner und Liebhaber”, for connoisseurs and amateurs written between 1779 and 1787. The smaller pieces are taken from other printed collections Keyboard pieces of various kinds and Musical miscellany, published 1765. The listener may thus compare styles of works written at the very end of the Baroque period, and others composed during a time when Haydn and Mozart were already  stars. Lubimov plays a modern copy of a Späht und Schmahl tangent piano built between 1794.