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Jan Hammer|The First Seven Days (Album Version)

The First Seven Days (Album Version)

Jan Hammer

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Mahavishnu Orchestra keyboard ace Jan Hammer offers up quite a thorough study in synthesizer technology with his second solo release, titled The First Seven Days. With the liner notes declaring "for those concerned, that there is no guitar on this album," Hammer makes it a point to further blur the distinction between the genres of jazz, rock, and classical music. Wishing to portray the first seven "days" of earth's creation, Hammer states that "assuming that each of these days lasted anywhere from one day to 100 million years, the scientific and biblical views do meet in certain points. These points were the inspiration for this album." His incorporation of the piano, electric piano, Moog synthesizer, Oberheim synthesizer, Freeman string synthesizer, and Mellotron vividly evokes images of bubbling cesspools and budding birthrights as his inspired version of the physical world sonically takes shape. While The First Seven Days is atmospheric in nature, with no proper pop sensibilities, its thematic construction yields nothing short of a classic narrative.
© Robert Gabriel /TiVo

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The First Seven Days (Album Version)

Jan Hammer

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1
Darkness / Earth In Search of a Sun (Album Version)
00:04:31

Jan Hammer, Producer - Jan Hammer, Percussion - Jan Hammer, Drums - Jan Hammer, Performer - J. Hammer, Lyricist - J. Hammer, Composer

(P) 1975 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

2
Light/Sun (Album Version)
00:06:43

Jan Hammer, Producer - Jan Hammer, Percussion - Jan Hammer, Drums - Jan Hammer, Performer - J. Hammer, Lyricist - J. Hammer, Composer - Steve Kindler, Violin

(P) 1975 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

3
Oceans And Continents (Album Version)
00:06:16

Jan Hammer, Producer - Jan Hammer, Percussion - Jan Hammer, Drums - Jan Hammer, Performer - J. Hammer, Lyricist - J. Hammer, Composer

(P) 1975 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

4
Fourth Day-Plants And Trees (Album Version)
00:02:46

Jan Hammer, Producer - Jan Hammer, Percussion - Jan Hammer, Drums - Jan Hammer, Performer - J. Hammer, Lyricist - J. Hammer, Composer

(P) 1975 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

5
The Animals (Album Version)
00:06:14

Jan Hammer, Producer - Jan Hammer, Percussion - Jan Hammer, Drums - Jan Hammer, Performer - J. Hammer, Lyricist - J. Hammer, Composer - Steve Kindler, Violin - David Earle Johnson, Percussion - David Earle Johnson, Congas

(P) 1975 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

6
Sixth Day-The People (Album Version)
00:07:14

Jan Hammer, Producer - Jan Hammer, Percussion - Jan Hammer, Drums - Jan Hammer, Performer - J. Hammer, Lyricist - J. Hammer, Composer - Steve Kindler, Violin - David Earle Johnson, Percussion - David Earle Johnson, Congas

(P) 1975 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

7
The Seventh Day (Album Version)
00:06:11

Jan Hammer, Producer - Jan Hammer, Percussion - Jan Hammer, Drums - Jan Hammer, Performer - J. Hammer, Lyricist - J. Hammer, Composer - Steve Kindler, Violin

(P) 1975 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

Album Description

Mahavishnu Orchestra keyboard ace Jan Hammer offers up quite a thorough study in synthesizer technology with his second solo release, titled The First Seven Days. With the liner notes declaring "for those concerned, that there is no guitar on this album," Hammer makes it a point to further blur the distinction between the genres of jazz, rock, and classical music. Wishing to portray the first seven "days" of earth's creation, Hammer states that "assuming that each of these days lasted anywhere from one day to 100 million years, the scientific and biblical views do meet in certain points. These points were the inspiration for this album." His incorporation of the piano, electric piano, Moog synthesizer, Oberheim synthesizer, Freeman string synthesizer, and Mellotron vividly evokes images of bubbling cesspools and budding birthrights as his inspired version of the physical world sonically takes shape. While The First Seven Days is atmospheric in nature, with no proper pop sensibilities, its thematic construction yields nothing short of a classic narrative.
© Robert Gabriel /TiVo

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