Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Killdozer|Little Baby Buntin'

Little Baby Buntin'

Killdozer

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Language available : english

Starting off with the most massive metal/arena rock-level stomp the band had yet recorded -- Butch Vig helping out again, making the trio sound like they were crushing skulls with every beat -- "Cotton Bolls" demonstrated that Killdozer kept things going loud and great on Little Baby Buntin'. Lines like "When I was a lad I polished my wood" and talking about shooting his dad in the gut after the latter was run over by a train showed that Gerald hardly needed to improve on his rasped, roaring vision of a screwy America. Musically, it even sounds like there's a bit of jangling guitar here and there; even, on "Hi There!," some acoustic guitar and string synths. However, Killdozer isn't exactly on the verge of suddenly turning into Depeche Mode or anything (the fact that the song is about a guy asking after his friend and getting kneed in the groin for his pains shows that much). There's more hip-swinging, high-volume strutting and bizarro rural-blues-gone-electric soloing from Bill Hobson and even a guest appearance from Englebert Humperdinck at the end of "3/4" Drill Bit." At a few points Gerald is just crude as opposed to wittily so, but even so, castrating the guy who insulted one's wife, as on "The Puppy," as sickeningly hilarious as it is, deserves some sort of credit. Then there's "The Rub," which somehow manages to quote a bit of Shakespeare toward the end of a semi-snuff tale before shifting into a celebration of coffee. The cover song torn to shreds this time? Neil Diamond's astounding '70s epic of nothing, "I Am, I Said," kept to the same pace but with a sweeping, loud majesty not even Mr. Hair himself could touch in his original.
© Ned Raggett /TiVo

More info

Little Baby Buntin'

Killdozer

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 80 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 80 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From 12,50€/month

1
Cotton Bolls
00:03:39

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

2
The Puppy
00:03:41

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

3
Hi There
00:03:23

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

4
Ballad of My Old Man
00:03:35

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

5
The Rub
00:05:37

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

6
3/4" Drill Bit
00:03:51

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

7
I Am, I Said
00:04:54

MCA, MusicPublisher - Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

8
Cyst
00:03:09

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

9
Never Gave Me a Kiss
00:03:47

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

10
The Noble Art of Self-Defense
00:03:27

Killdozer, Artist, MainArtist - Roadkill Music, MusicPublisher

1989 Touch and Go Records 1989 Touch and Go Records

Album Description

Starting off with the most massive metal/arena rock-level stomp the band had yet recorded -- Butch Vig helping out again, making the trio sound like they were crushing skulls with every beat -- "Cotton Bolls" demonstrated that Killdozer kept things going loud and great on Little Baby Buntin'. Lines like "When I was a lad I polished my wood" and talking about shooting his dad in the gut after the latter was run over by a train showed that Gerald hardly needed to improve on his rasped, roaring vision of a screwy America. Musically, it even sounds like there's a bit of jangling guitar here and there; even, on "Hi There!," some acoustic guitar and string synths. However, Killdozer isn't exactly on the verge of suddenly turning into Depeche Mode or anything (the fact that the song is about a guy asking after his friend and getting kneed in the groin for his pains shows that much). There's more hip-swinging, high-volume strutting and bizarro rural-blues-gone-electric soloing from Bill Hobson and even a guest appearance from Englebert Humperdinck at the end of "3/4" Drill Bit." At a few points Gerald is just crude as opposed to wittily so, but even so, castrating the guy who insulted one's wife, as on "The Puppy," as sickeningly hilarious as it is, deserves some sort of credit. Then there's "The Rub," which somehow manages to quote a bit of Shakespeare toward the end of a semi-snuff tale before shifting into a celebration of coffee. The cover song torn to shreds this time? Neil Diamond's astounding '70s epic of nothing, "I Am, I Said," kept to the same pace but with a sweeping, loud majesty not even Mr. Hair himself could touch in his original.
© Ned Raggett /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

I Dream Of Christmas

Norah Jones

I Dream Of Christmas Norah Jones

...‘Til We Meet Again - Live

Norah Jones

Ghost Song

Cécile McLorin Salvant

Ghost Song Cécile McLorin Salvant

Beethoven : 9 Symphonies (1963)

Herbert von Karajan

Beethoven : 9 Symphonies (1963) Herbert von Karajan
More on Qobuz
By Killdozer

Move (feat. Playboy The Beast)

Killdozer

Uncompromising War on Art Under the Dictatorship of the Proletariat

Killdozer

Intellectuals Are the Shoeshine Boys of the Ruling Elite

Killdozer

Snakeboy

Killdozer

Snakeboy Killdozer

Twelve Point Buck

Killdozer

Twelve Point Buck Killdozer
You may also like...

A Light for Attracting Attention

The Smile

Happier Than Ever (Explicit)

Billie Eilish

My Universe

Coldplay

My Universe Coldplay

Unlimited Love

Red Hot Chili Peppers

Unlimited Love Red Hot Chili Peppers

WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?

Billie Eilish

In your panoramas...
The Dark Side of the Moon: An Astronomical Success

Pink Floyd's ground-breaking album The Dark Side of the Moon was the result of a long creative process that began around 1968. A Saucerful of Secrets (the main track from the eponymous album) was, for Nick Mason at least, where it all began. Their next album Ummagumma (1969) gave each band member the opportunity to create a solo piece, though they would have to combine their talents if they wanted to hit the jackpot. Pink Floyd continued to search for the perfect record with Meddle, an album which highlighted their skills in the studio, and Atom Heart Mother, before they reached nirvana with The Dark Side of the Moon. And the album’s perfection hasn’t faded one bit.

Warp, 30 Years of Groundbreaking Music

Warp, the record label which led to the blossoming of some of the most boundary-pushing artists of the electronic music scene, such as Aphex Twin, LFO, Boards of Canada, Autechre, and Squarepusher, now has their catalogue available on Qobuz. It’s the perfect opportunity to revisit the history of Britain’s best-respected independent label.

Iggy and the Stooges: The Dawn of Punk

In 1969, a group of self-confessed cretins dynamited rock'n'roll with a charge of distortion and nihilistic lyrics. At the head of these Stooges was Iggy Pop, a sort of obsessive, rebellious Nijinsky, who was destined to become the Godfather of punk rock.

In the news...