Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Andreas Ottensamer - Brahms: The Hungarian Connection

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Brahms: The Hungarian Connection

Andreas Ottensamer

Digital booklet

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 96.0 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Select Audio Quality

To be elegible for this price, subscribe to Sublime+

Language available : english

Andreas Ottensamer, principal clarinetist of the Berlin Philharmonic, has released several innovatively programmed albums without resorting to common crossover formulas. Brahms: The Hungarian Connection is another. The title is perhaps a bit too strong in that the last part of the program does not consist of music by Brahms and, in fact, has no direct connection to Brahms. But as a recital juxtaposing Hungarian folk sounds with their ramifications in the concert repertoire, the program works well. Some may not have thought of the Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115, as a Hungarian piece, but listen again to the slow movement passage where the string quartet conjures up a cimbalom. The extremely gentle performance of the quintet is worth the price of admission in itself; for a reading by an all-star group as opposed to an established ensemble, it breathes unusually well. The quartet's cellist, Stephan Koncz, arranged the rest of the music for clarinet and string quartet, and he certainly doesn't do anything an average Viennese musician might not have attempted during Brahms' lifetime. From two lightly Hungarian waltzes (one from the Op. 39 set for piano four-hands and one from the Liebeslieder Waltzes, Op. 52), listeners move into more explicitly Hungarian material, first arranged by Brahms and then by other composers. It's an unorthodox recital structure, but it's effective, leading both to some little-known and fun pieces (the Two Movements of Hungarian composer Leó Weiner) and then to an infectious Transylvanian dance medley finale. Ottensamer's tone modulates nicely from ultra-smooth in the Brahms to peppy in the more Hungarian pieces. Recommended for Brahmsians and clarinet lovers alike.
© TiVo

More info

Brahms: The Hungarian Connection

Andreas Ottensamer

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 60 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 60 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op.115 (Johannes Brahms)

1
1. Allegro
00:13:01

Johannes Brahms, Composer - Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Cello, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

2
2. Adagio
00:11:42

Johannes Brahms, Composer - Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Cello, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

3
3. Andantino - Presto non assai, ma con sentimento
00:04:51

Johannes Brahms, Composer - Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Cello, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

4
4. Con moto
00:10:18

Johannes Brahms, Composer - Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Cello, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

Two Waltzes in A Major (Johannes Brahms)

5
Brahms: Two Waltzes in A Major, Op.39, No.15 & Op.52, No.6
00:02:52

Johannes Brahms, Composer - Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Odon Racz, Double Bass, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Arranger, Cello, Work Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

Hungarian Dance No. 7, WoO 1 (Johannes Brahms)

6
Brahms, Reményi: Hungarian Dance No. 7, WoO 1
00:02:13

Johannes Brahms, Composer - Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Odon Racz, Double Bass, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Ede Reményi, Composer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Arranger, Cello, Work Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Oszkár Ökrös, Cimbalom, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

Hungarian Dance No. 1 (Isteni Csárdás), WoO 1 (Johannes Brahms)

7
Borzó, Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 1 (Isteni Csárdás), WoO 1
00:05:30

Johannes Brahms, Composer - Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Odon Racz, Double Bass, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Arranger, Cello, Work Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Oszkár Ökrös, Cimbalom, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Miskától Borzó, Composer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

Ket Tetel (Leó Weiner)

8
Weiner: Két Tétel - Búsuló juhász (Woeful Shepherd)
00:02:26

Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Weiner, Composer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Odon Racz, Double Bass, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Arranger, Cello, Work Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Oszkár Ökrös, Cimbalom, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

9
Weiner: Két Tétel - Csűrdöngölő (Barndance)
00:02:03

Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Leo Weiner, Composer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Odon Racz, Double Bass, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Arranger, Cello, Work Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Oszkár Ökrös, Cimbalom, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

Dances From Transylvania (Traditional)

10
Traditional: Dances From Transylvania
00:06:46

Traditional, ComposerLyricist - Antoine Tamestit, Viola, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Philipp Nedel, Producer, Recording Producer - Leonidas Kavakos, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Andreas Ottensamer, Clarinet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Odon Racz, Double Bass, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Christoph Koncz, Violin, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Dr. Alexander Buhr, Producer, Executive Producer - Stephan Koncz, Arranger, Cello, Work Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Oszkár Ökrös, Cimbalom, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Predrag Tomic, Accordion, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2015 Mercury Classics

Album Description

Andreas Ottensamer, principal clarinetist of the Berlin Philharmonic, has released several innovatively programmed albums without resorting to common crossover formulas. Brahms: The Hungarian Connection is another. The title is perhaps a bit too strong in that the last part of the program does not consist of music by Brahms and, in fact, has no direct connection to Brahms. But as a recital juxtaposing Hungarian folk sounds with their ramifications in the concert repertoire, the program works well. Some may not have thought of the Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115, as a Hungarian piece, but listen again to the slow movement passage where the string quartet conjures up a cimbalom. The extremely gentle performance of the quintet is worth the price of admission in itself; for a reading by an all-star group as opposed to an established ensemble, it breathes unusually well. The quartet's cellist, Stephan Koncz, arranged the rest of the music for clarinet and string quartet, and he certainly doesn't do anything an average Viennese musician might not have attempted during Brahms' lifetime. From two lightly Hungarian waltzes (one from the Op. 39 set for piano four-hands and one from the Liebeslieder Waltzes, Op. 52), listeners move into more explicitly Hungarian material, first arranged by Brahms and then by other composers. It's an unorthodox recital structure, but it's effective, leading both to some little-known and fun pieces (the Two Movements of Hungarian composer Leó Weiner) and then to an infectious Transylvanian dance medley finale. Ottensamer's tone modulates nicely from ultra-smooth in the Brahms to peppy in the more Hungarian pieces. Recommended for Brahmsians and clarinet lovers alike.
© TiVo

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...
More on Qobuz
By Andreas Ottensamer

Playlists

You may also like...
In your panoramas...
Neoclassicism: The New World Between Classical Music and Electro

Ólafur Arnalds, Nils Frahm, Max Richter, Poppy Ackroyd, Peter Broderick, Joana Gama... In recent years, these popular names have all been grouped under the vast and imprecise label "neoclassical". In truth, this "scene" looks more like a motley crew of curious artists who mix classical instruments with electronic production. Drawing influence from American minimalism, these musicians tantalise the senses and expand horizons on both sides of the musical spectrum.

Strauss & Kempe: Elective Affinities

The name of conductor Rudolf Kempe (1910-1976) is indissociable from those of composer Richard Strauss and the Dresden Staatskapelle orchestra. As Warner is now re-releasing the recordings made between 1970 and 1975, Qobuz is putting the spotlight on the Straussian legacy of a precise, often incisive conductor, who always paid the greatest attention to the text and its charms.

Danny Elfman in Ten Albums

From fairy tales to wacky comedies, from the most extraordinary orchestral works to understated pieces, for almost forty years now Danny Elfman has been crafting his unique sound and injecting it into Hollywood productions by the likes of Tim Burton or Gus Van Sant. We look back over ten albums from his career, exploring both his essential works and less well-known compositions.

In the news...