Votre panier est vide

Catégories :

Artistes similaires

Les albums

A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 novembre 1975 | Epic - Legacy

After disintegrating the Amboy Dukes in the early '70s, Ted Nugent finally decided to strike out on his own as a solo star. Even without a recording contract, Nugent toured constantly, built up a fervent following, and created a smoking hard rock quartet with the help of singer/guitarist Derek St. Holmes, bassist Rob Grange, and drummer Cliff Davies. The band's first release, 1975's Ted Nugent, is a prime slice of testosterone-heavy, raging, unapologetic rock & roll, and along with the band's 1977 release Cat Scratch Fever, it is Nugent's best solo studio album. While the grinding opening track, "Stranglehold," stretches beyond eight minutes and contains several extended, fiery-hot guitar leads, it does not come off as your typical '70s overindulgent fare -- every single note counts, as Nugent wails away as if his life depended on it. Other Nuge classics include "Motor City Madhouse," plus the St. Holmes-sung "Hey Baby" and "Just What the Doctor Ordered," all eventually becoming arena staples and making the band one of the late-'70s top concert draws. Additional highlights are the unexpected breezy jazz ballad "You Make Me Feel Right at Home," plus the untamed rockers "Stormtroopin'" and "Queen of the Forest." Nugent himself hails Ted Nugent as his best work, and with good reason. It's an essential hard rock classic. As with Nugent's other 1999 reissues, an insightful essay on this Nugent era by journalist Gary Graff is included, plus bonus tracks. © Greg Prato /TiVo
A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 novembre 1975 | Epic - Legacy

After disintegrating the Amboy Dukes in the early '70s, Ted Nugent finally decided to strike out on his own as a solo star. Even without a recording contract, Nugent toured constantly, built up a fervent following, and created a smoking hard rock quartet with the help of singer/guitarist Derek St. Holmes, bassist Rob Grange, and drummer Cliff Davies. The band's first release, 1975's Ted Nugent, is a prime slice of testosterone-heavy, raging, unapologetic rock & roll, and along with the band's 1977 release Cat Scratch Fever, it is Nugent's best solo studio album. While the grinding opening track, "Stranglehold," stretches beyond eight minutes and contains several extended, fiery-hot guitar leads, it does not come off as your typical '70s overindulgent fare -- every single note counts, as Nugent wails away as if his life depended on it. Other Nuge classics include "Motor City Madhouse," plus the St. Holmes-sung "Hey Baby" and "Just What the Doctor Ordered," all eventually becoming arena staples and making the band one of the late-'70s top concert draws. Additional highlights are the unexpected breezy jazz ballad "You Make Me Feel Right at Home," plus the untamed rockers "Stormtroopin'" and "Queen of the Forest." Nugent himself hails Ted Nugent as his best work, and with good reason. It's an essential hard rock classic. As with Nugent's other 1999 reissues, an insightful essay on this Nugent era by journalist Gary Graff is included, plus bonus tracks. © Greg Prato /TiVo
A partir de :
CD18,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 26 mars 2002 | Epic - Legacy

Epic/Legacy's double-disc set The Ultimate Ted Nugent falls short of its billing for a couple of reasons. First of all, even if the sound is very good, there are no liner notes -- just shots of Ted doing his guitar-face on-stage, plus pictures of his Epic albums. Second, this concentrates just on his Epic recordings, without dipping into the Amboy Dukes, while also ignoring latter-day recordings for other labels, including his manly tribute to the great hunter, "Fred Bear" (if you live in Michigan, where you can't go a day in hunting season without hearing this song, you know this is a crucial omission). So, what do you get? A double-disc collection of Ted the "wildman" at his peak -- which is good for those that just want the prime and the prime only, but it's a bit much for those that just want hits. As far as music goes, it's pretty good, since it does have those basic hits, but it's still a bit much and it could have been produced with a bit more care. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1977 | Epic - Legacy

Après avoir enfin décroché la timbale en 1975/76 avec ses deux précédents albums solo, vingt ans après ses débuts, ce Républicain conservateur homophobe et chasseur, accessoirement guitariste et chanteur de hard rock, récidive avec cette collection prétexte à des riffs d’intro bien ancrés dans le genre et des refrains répétés jusqu’à saturation. Le riff du titre phare « Cat Scratch Fever » (la maladie des griffes du chat, ou lymphoréticulose) est en effet une trouvaille assez maligne, basé sur un accord de Blues. Ce morceau devenu emblématique de Ted Nugent a été repris entre autres par Motörhead en 1992 et Pantera en 1999. Le reste est à l’avenant, et contient l’un de ces instrumentaux spectaculaires dont le musicien était friand, ici le mélodique « Home Bound » joué sur sa fameuse Gibson Byrdland. Mais c’est le rap hard rock « Wang Dang Sweet Poontang » qui remporte l’affaire, un tempo ultra rapide bénéficiant de peut-être le meilleur solo de guitare qu’il ait imaginé, et qui rendait encore mieux en concert. Il s’est vendu trois millions de copies de cet album aux seuls Etats-Unis, permettant à son auteur de poursuivre une carrière scénique déjà fort lucrative. Il est co-produit par Tom Werman (Cheap Trick), et son excellent et propre batteur le fidèle Cliff Davies (huit albums avec son patron, il s’est suicidé en avril 2008). © ©Copyright Music Story Jean-Noël Ogouz 2021
A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 7 janvier 1976 | Epic - Legacy

While Ted Nugent's second solo album, 1976's Free-for-All, was another raging slab of rock & roll, it wasn't quite as consistent as his self-titled debut. The main reason was due to singer/rhythm guitarist Derek St. Holmes' departure from the band just as recording of the album began (due to constant grappling with the Nuge about certain musical issues). To solve the problem, producer Tom Werman convinced a then-unknown singer by the name of Meat Loaf to handle the vocal chores on the songs Derek was going to sing. While it seems like a mismatch in theory, the results were not catastrophic -- such rockers as "Writing on the Wall" (a virtual rewrite of "Stranglehold"), "Street Rats," and "Hammerdown" are classic Nuge stompers. But they would have been stronger with St. Holmes' contributions, as evidenced by a bonus outtake of "Street Rats" with St. Holmes on vocals and the turbo-charged "Turn It Up." But still, the title track is one of Ted's all-time best (featuring a downright vicious groove), as is the rocking tale about the 1967 Detroit riots, "Dog Eat Dog." Despite St. Holmes' absence (he would return in time for the album's subsequent tour), Free-for-All solidified Ted's commercial success, reaching the Top 25. © Greg Prato /TiVo
A partir de :
CD18,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1978 | Epic - Legacy

As exciting as they were, Ted Nugent's first three albums lacked the sonic punch in the gut of his outrageous live performances, something readily proved by 1978's classic Double Live Gonzo! Both Nugent and his band are in top form, yielding a fierce performance of their numerous mid-'70s classics. Mega-hit "Cat Scratch Fever" makes an obligatory appearance, but it's the songs from Nugent's self-titled debut which truly stand out. "Just What the Doctor Ordered" is damn near perfect, and the band really clicks on extended jams through "Motor City Madhouse" and the fantastic "Stranglehold." A consummate showman, Nugent also unleashes a number of hilarious, motormouth stage raps on "Baby Please Don't Go" and "Wang Dang Sweet Poontang" before offering the definitive version of his early classic "Great White Buffalo." In the year of the live album (1978), this one's about as good as they come. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1981 | Epic - Legacy

When originally released in 1981, the ten-track Great Gonzos!: The Best of Ted Nugent was an expertly selected collection of Ted Nugent's best-known material. But with the advent of the CD, the length of albums could be stretched out, and such is the case with the 1999 reissue of Great Gonzos! All of the previous ten tracks are remastered and featured in all of their ferocious glory, as well as three extra tracks not included on the original: the exceptional instrumental from 1977, "Home Bound," plus the explosive rockers "Yank Me, Crank Me" and "Give Me Just a Little." While the Nuge is known primarily for his shorter compositions that are still classic rock radio favorites ("Cat Scratch Fever," "Just What the Doctor Ordered," "Free-for-All," "Dog Eat Dog"), his longer tracks are just as gripping ("Stranglehold," "Wango Tango," "Wang Dang Sweet Poontang"). The selections are taken mostly from Nugent's first three albums (his best work), but Great Gonzos! still neglects several standouts, such as "Hey Baby," "Live It Up," and "Out of Control." Still, Great Gonzos!: The Best of Ted Nugent remains an essential purchase for admirers of fine '70s-era hard rock. © Greg Prato /TiVo
A partir de :
CD18,99 €

Pop - Paru le 26 mars 2002 | Epic

Epic/Legacy's double-disc set The Ultimate Ted Nugent falls short of its billing for a couple of reasons. First of all, even if the sound is very good, there are no liner notes -- just shots of Ted doing his guitar-face on-stage, plus pictures of his Epic albums. Second, this concentrates just on his Epic recordings, without dipping into the Amboy Dukes, while also ignoring latter-day recordings for other labels, including his manly tribute to the great hunter, "Fred Bear" (if you live in Michigan, where you can't go a day in hunting season without hearing this song, you know this is a crucial omission). So, what do you get? A double-disc collection of Ted the "wildman" at his peak -- which is good for those that just want the prime and the prime only, but it's a bit much for those that just want hits. As far as music goes, it's pretty good, since it does have those basic hits, but it's still a bit much and it could have been produced with a bit more care. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
A partir de :
CD8,99 €

Rock - Paru le 8 juillet 2014 | Round Hill Music

A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Hard Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1978 | Epic

Weekend Warriors, Ted Nugent's follow-up to the career peaks of Cat Scratch Fever and Double Live Gonzo, isn't quite as strong as his two previous albums, but it remains one of his better albums, featuring a handful of prime hard rockers. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
A partir de :
CD9,99 €

Rock - Paru le 9 novembre 2018 | Round Hill Music

A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1977 | Epic - Legacy

Après avoir enfin décroché la timbale en 1975/76 avec ses deux précédents albums solo, vingt ans après ses débuts, ce Républicain conservateur homophobe et chasseur, accessoirement guitariste et chanteur de hard rock, récidive avec cette collection prétexte à des riffs d’intro bien ancrés dans le genre et des refrains répétés jusqu’à saturation. Le riff du titre phare « Cat Scratch Fever » (la maladie des griffes du chat, ou lymphoréticulose) est en effet une trouvaille assez maligne, basé sur un accord de Blues. Ce morceau devenu emblématique de Ted Nugent a été repris entre autres par Motörhead en 1992 et Pantera en 1999. Le reste est à l’avenant, et contient l’un de ces instrumentaux spectaculaires dont le musicien était friand, ici le mélodique « Home Bound » joué sur sa fameuse Gibson Byrdland. Mais c’est le rap hard rock « Wang Dang Sweet Poontang » qui remporte l’affaire, un tempo ultra rapide bénéficiant de peut-être le meilleur solo de guitare qu’il ait imaginé, et qui rendait encore mieux en concert. Il s’est vendu trois millions de copies de cet album aux seuls Etats-Unis, permettant à son auteur de poursuivre une carrière scénique déjà fort lucrative. Il est co-produit par Tom Werman (Cheap Trick), et son excellent et propre batteur le fidèle Cliff Davies (huit albums avec son patron, il s’est suicidé en avril 2008). © ©Copyright Music Story Jean-Noël Ogouz 2021
A partir de :
CD18,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 26 mars 2002 | Epic - Legacy

Epic/Legacy's double-disc set The Ultimate Ted Nugent falls short of its billing for a couple of reasons. First of all, even if the sound is very good, there are no liner notes -- just shots of Ted doing his guitar-face on-stage, plus pictures of his Epic albums. Second, this concentrates just on his Epic recordings, without dipping into the Amboy Dukes, while also ignoring latter-day recordings for other labels, including his manly tribute to the great hunter, "Fred Bear" (if you live in Michigan, where you can't go a day in hunting season without hearing this song, you know this is a crucial omission). So, what do you get? A double-disc collection of Ted the "wildman" at his peak -- which is good for those that just want the prime and the prime only, but it's a bit much for those that just want hits. As far as music goes, it's pretty good, since it does have those basic hits, but it's still a bit much and it could have been produced with a bit more care. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1979 | Epic

Don't know if Tom Werman is considered a production genius, but this in-house hair architect helmed some of the sharpest recordings in the catalogs of Cheap Trick, Mötley Crüe, and the Producers. He also varnished Ted Nugent's three-and-a-half stadium stompers per album and added enough subtle seasonings to the remaining roadkill to construct a consistent record while the MC Madman ran off to the stage or the woods. In 1979, Nugent's face graced a pinball game, but behind the bells and lights, he still needed the studio support of Werman on State of Shock to make the predictable pieces fit. The terrible one uses and abuses the same formula every outing, so nothing unexpected is expected. But drummer Cliff Davies takes over Werman's boards completely, and the crisp cutout sound starkly exposes recycled riffs and bloozy boredom. Nuge's brush with the Beatles pops out, but hints of his '80s dearth creep among too many fair-to-middling grooves, some of which, in Nuge's tender terms, "Bite Down Hard." Course some erudite scholars justifiably claim State of Shock sizzles with the true Ted Nugent, no longer disinfected for the airwaves. Granted, "Paralyzed," "Snake Charmer," and "It Don't Matter" are electrifying, with razor-sharp guitar, but these afternoon buzzers would sound better at the next Nugent show, fired off with his other silver-tippers. Most rock music of the late '70s attained a dreamy level of sophistication where the listeners put on gargantuan headphones just to be closer to the music, regardless of the lyrics, but no need for phones here. State of Shock is only half-cocked and ended Nugent's platinum period. Next time out he produces himself, and then keyboards hunt down the Nuge. © Doug Stone /TiVo
A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Hard Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1980 | Epic

"Awriiiiiight, uh ze WANGO ze TANGO! One, two, three, four!" With that shriek and bludgeoning, rudimentary tandem guitar and bass riffing, Ted Nugent launches his 1980 album Scream Dream with "Wango Tango." Sweaty Teddy ain't one for subtlety, and in addition to unleashing his six-string thunder on this wickedly catchy "song," he lets loose with a slobbering, maniacal spoken section in the middle. With a handful of exceptions, Nugent isn't a good songwriter, but he plays a mean guitar, and that's really what people want to hear. His wicked playing sounds different from most of his fellow hard rock and heavy metal axemen due to his extensive use of warm-sounding, hollow-body Gibson Byrdland guitars. "Scream Dream" is darn near as addictive as "Wango Tango." The slippery mid-tempo groove of "Hard as Nails" hints at Nugent's R&B influences, but the funky bass and throaty vocals on "Terminus Eldorado" makes them crystal clear. "Flesh & Blood" is a taut, simple rocker. Early 1950s-styled, Chuck Berry-like rock & roll is the basis for "I Gotta Move" and "Don't Cry (I'll Be Back Before You Know It Baby)," and both are sung by rhythm guitarist Charlie Huhn. Drummer/producer Cliff Davies gets to sing "Come and Get It." Scream Dream isn't a good album, but "Wango Tango" and the title track are two of the Motor City Madman's better tunes. © Bret Adams /TiVo
A partir de :
CD8,99 €

Rock - Paru le 2 mai 1995 | Round Hill Music

A partir de :
CD14,49 €

Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1975 | Epic - Legacy

Super Hits is a budget-priced ten-track collection that actually features most of Ted Nugent's greatest hits: "Free for All," "Cat Scratch Fever," "Wango Tango," "Dog Eat Dog," "Stranglehold." Casual fans, those who only want hits, might find this preferable to the double-disc Out of Control, but serious fans should bypass this concise collection in favor of that set. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
A partir de :
CD5,99 €

Hard Rock - Paru le 8 décembre 2013 | Carter Lane - OMiP

A partir de :
CD8,99 €

Rock - Paru le 5 juin 2001 | Round Hill Music

A partir de :
CD18,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1978 | Epic

As exciting as they were, Ted Nugent's first three albums lacked the sonic punch in the gut of his outrageous live performances, something readily proved by 1978's classic Double Live Gonzo! Both Nugent and his band are in top form, yielding a fierce performance of their numerous mid-'70s classics. Mega-hit "Cat Scratch Fever" makes an obligatory appearance, but it's the songs from Nugent's self-titled debut which truly stand out. "Just What the Doctor Ordered" is damn near perfect, and the band really clicks on extended jams through "Motor City Madhouse" and the fantastic "Stranglehold." A consummate showman, Nugent also unleashes a number of hilarious, motormouth stage raps on "Baby Please Don't Go" and "Wang Dang Sweet Poontang" before offering the definitive version of his early classic "Great White Buffalo." In the year of the live album (1978), this one's about as good as they come. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo