Catégories :
Panier 0

Votre panier est vide

Art Ensemble Of Chicago - The Meeting

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

The Meeting

Art Ensemble of Chicago

Disponible en
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Musique illimitée

Écoutez cet album en haute-qualité dès maintenant dans nos applications

Démarrer ma période d'essai et lancer l'écoute de cet album

Profitez de cet album sur les apps Qobuz grâce à votre abonnement

Souscrire

Profitez de cet album sur les apps Qobuz grâce à votre abonnement

Téléchargement digital

Téléchargez cet album dans la qualité de votre choix

Langue disponible : anglais

How strange that there are two studio albums by the Art Ensemble of Chicago issued in 2003, both without Lester Bowie, on two different labels. The ECM album is a tribute to the late Bowie and is made up of the surviving members of the working Art Ensemble -- Roscoe Mitchell, Malachi Favors, and Don Moye -- and the album at hand is a reunion of sorts with composer and multi-instrumentalist Joseph Jarman, who retired in the early '90s. While the former album is on the group's American label, ECM, and is a formal tribute to Bowie, it is the latter that more formally encapsulates the Art Ensemble's classic vision of free improvisation, non-Western folk traditions, and jazz as one in the same brew. And yes, Bowie's hard-swinging humorous presence is missed, and to the band's credit, they've made no attempt to fill the void on either recording. The Meeting is not, however, a reacquaintance with Jarman. His composition, "Hail We Now Sing Joy," a hard bopping, scatting tribute to Buddha Shakyamuni, opens the album and creates a space where his trad jazz roots and Bowie's ongoing sense of history are melded by the band, which negotiates the territory with great verve and taste. "It's the Sign of the Times," written by Favors, revisits with deeper wisdom, expansive texture, and more pronounced dynamics the territory the Art Ensemble explored on its first album, People in Sorrow, in 1967. Each member solos for an extended period before the band comes together in a final movement that encapsulates all the varying themes. Almost 19 minutes in length, it's a portrait of the Art Ensemble as individuals coming together to form an inseparable bond and commitment to the creation of sound as music; the pace is slow and purposeful and the expressionism created by the unit is out of this world. "Tech Ritter and the Megabytes" is one of those beautiful Mitchell pieces that is a space-age nursery rhyme (à la "Snurdy McGurdy and Her Dancin' Shoes"). Only four and a half minutes in length, it offers striated interwoven melodies along the shimmering harmonic edge of the blues. Three of the remaining four selections are group improvisations broken only by Mitchell's title composition of fat R&B and swing-styled horn lines. Of these, it is the dreamy percussion and woodwind-oriented "Wind and Drum" that is the most moving as it walks the line of spatial relationships to silence, lyric, and non-determinate unfolding. The sense of play that the AEC does so well is what drives "The Train to lo," the album's closer. Bells, whistles, basses played as drums, and sopranino saxophones create lines of communication along attenuated rhythms and faltering interludes that nonetheless create more space for dialogue as they wander in and out of the mix. This is a glorious reunion album, one that delights as it provokes.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

Plus d'informations

The Meeting

Art Ensemble Of Chicago

launch qobuz app J'ai déjà téléchargé Qobuz pour Mac OS Ouvrir

download qobuz app Je n'ai pas encore téléchargé Qobuz pour Mac OS Télécharger l'app

Copier le lien pour partager la page

Vous êtes actuellement en train d’écouter des extraits.

Écoutez plus de 70 millions de titres avec votre abonnement illimité.

Écoutez cet album et plus de 70 millions de titres avec votre abonnement illimité.

1
Hail We Now Sing Joy
00:04:56

Art Ensemble of Chicago, MainArtist

2003 Pi Records, Inc 2003 Pi Records, Inc

2
It's The Sign of the Times
00:18:44

Art Ensemble of Chicago, MainArtist

2003 Pi Records, Inc 2003 Pi Records, Inc

3
Tech Ritter and the Megabytes
00:04:22

Art Ensemble of Chicago, MainArtist

2003 Pi Records, Inc 2003 Pi Records, Inc

4
Wind and Drum
00:11:09

Art Ensemble of Chicago, MainArtist

2003 Pi Records, Inc 2003 Pi Records, Inc

5
The Meeting
00:06:49

Art Ensemble of Chicago, MainArtist

2003 Pi Records, Inc 2003 Pi Records, Inc

6
Amin Bidness
00:08:33

Art Ensemble of Chicago, MainArtist

2003 Pi Records, Inc 2003 Pi Records, Inc

7
The Train To Io
00:04:53

Art Ensemble of Chicago, MainArtist

2003 Pi Records, Inc 2003 Pi Records, Inc

Descriptif de l'album

How strange that there are two studio albums by the Art Ensemble of Chicago issued in 2003, both without Lester Bowie, on two different labels. The ECM album is a tribute to the late Bowie and is made up of the surviving members of the working Art Ensemble -- Roscoe Mitchell, Malachi Favors, and Don Moye -- and the album at hand is a reunion of sorts with composer and multi-instrumentalist Joseph Jarman, who retired in the early '90s. While the former album is on the group's American label, ECM, and is a formal tribute to Bowie, it is the latter that more formally encapsulates the Art Ensemble's classic vision of free improvisation, non-Western folk traditions, and jazz as one in the same brew. And yes, Bowie's hard-swinging humorous presence is missed, and to the band's credit, they've made no attempt to fill the void on either recording. The Meeting is not, however, a reacquaintance with Jarman. His composition, "Hail We Now Sing Joy," a hard bopping, scatting tribute to Buddha Shakyamuni, opens the album and creates a space where his trad jazz roots and Bowie's ongoing sense of history are melded by the band, which negotiates the territory with great verve and taste. "It's the Sign of the Times," written by Favors, revisits with deeper wisdom, expansive texture, and more pronounced dynamics the territory the Art Ensemble explored on its first album, People in Sorrow, in 1967. Each member solos for an extended period before the band comes together in a final movement that encapsulates all the varying themes. Almost 19 minutes in length, it's a portrait of the Art Ensemble as individuals coming together to form an inseparable bond and commitment to the creation of sound as music; the pace is slow and purposeful and the expressionism created by the unit is out of this world. "Tech Ritter and the Megabytes" is one of those beautiful Mitchell pieces that is a space-age nursery rhyme (à la "Snurdy McGurdy and Her Dancin' Shoes"). Only four and a half minutes in length, it offers striated interwoven melodies along the shimmering harmonic edge of the blues. Three of the remaining four selections are group improvisations broken only by Mitchell's title composition of fat R&B and swing-styled horn lines. Of these, it is the dreamy percussion and woodwind-oriented "Wind and Drum" that is the most moving as it walks the line of spatial relationships to silence, lyric, and non-determinate unfolding. The sense of play that the AEC does so well is what drives "The Train to lo," the album's closer. Bells, whistles, basses played as drums, and sopranino saxophones create lines of communication along attenuated rhythms and faltering interludes that nonetheless create more space for dialogue as they wander in and out of the mix. This is a glorious reunion album, one that delights as it provokes.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

À propos

Améliorer cette page album

Qobuz logo Pourquoi acheter sur Qobuz ?

Les promotions du moment...

Aqualung

Jethro Tull

Aqualung Jethro Tull

Crime Of The Century [2014 - HD Remaster]

Supertramp

Thick as a Brick

Jethro Tull

Thick as a Brick Jethro Tull

Misplaced Childhood

Marillion

À découvrir également
Par Art Ensemble Of Chicago

Chicago Jazz Festival 1980 (Live WBEZ Broadcast)

Art Ensemble Of Chicago

We Are On the Edge: A 50th Anniversary Celebration

Art Ensemble Of Chicago

The Third Decade

Art Ensemble Of Chicago

The Third Decade Art Ensemble Of Chicago

Nice Guys

Art Ensemble Of Chicago

Nice Guys Art Ensemble Of Chicago

Urban Bushmen

Art Ensemble Of Chicago

Urban Bushmen Art Ensemble Of Chicago

Playlists

Dans la même thématique...

Side-Eye NYC (V1.IV)

Pat Metheny

Side-Eye NYC (V1.IV) Pat Metheny

BD Music Presents Miles Davis

Miles Davis

Le Jazz de Cabu - Une petite histoire du swing de Louis Armstrong à Miles Davis...

Various Artists

On Vacation

Till Brönner

On Vacation Till Brönner

Sunset In The Blue (Deluxe Version)

Melody Gardot

Les Grands Angles...
ECM en 10 albums

Le plus beau son après le silence. C’est la formule qui colle à la peau d’ECM depuis cinquante ans et la sortie du séminal « Free at Last » du Mal Waldron Trio, en novembre 1969. Manfred Eicher, le charismatique fondateur du label munichois, ne vit pas « hors du temps » mais plus précisément dans « un temps parallèle » à celui de la société, faisant d’ECM une planète de toute beauté où le jazz résonne autrement. Et c’est souvent pour ECM que Keith Jarrett, Charles Lloyd, Jan Garbarek, Chick Corea et tant d’autres ont enregistré leurs disques les plus intenses. Plus encore que pour Blue Note ou Impulse!, se limiter à 10 albums pour raconter toute l’histoire de ce label hors-norme est mission impossible. Aussi, les 10 sélectionnés raconteront « une » histoire d’ECM.

Le rock progressif en 10 albums

Les influences sont insaissisables, toujours en mouvement et reconfigurations. Une même source d’inspiration connaitra des déclinaisons fort différentes selon le prisme et le présent à travers lesquels elle resurgira. Au cours des 40 dernières années le rock progressif a connu le sommet des charts, le sérieux des pupitres ou les honneurs de l’appellation art-rock. Cette esthétique a développé un élargissement de son lexique par la combinaison de codes antérieurs à des enjeux artistiques et culturels sans cesse renouvelés. Si le rock progressif n’est plus nécessairement revendiqué aujourd’hui avec la même ferveur qu’hier, on peut cependant toujours observer son empreinte chez des artistes allant de Tool à Kanye West. Voici dix albums majeurs, dont le rayonnement n’est pas près de faiblir.

Frank Zappa, pour le meilleur et pour le rire

Plus les années passent depuis la disparition de Frank Zappa le 4 décembre 1993, plus son absence se fait cruellement sentir dans le panorama musical actuel. Non pas qu'on l'ait oublié, mais on cherchera en vain ceux qui peuvent prétendre l’égaler. Le génie aussi cosmique que comique de Frank Zappa n'a aucun équivalent aujourd'hui, car personne, depuis près de trois décennies, n’a été capable comme lui de conjuguer la plus grande exigence musicale avec un humour totalement décomplexé.

Dans l'actualité...