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Funk - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1981 | Motown

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Funk - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1981 | Motown

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Funk - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1978 | Motown

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After returning to the U.S. from London, where he fronted the blues band Mainline, Rick James cut one album with White Cane before he turned to his own solo venture. By 1977, he'd begun working with the Stone City Band, emerging at the end of the year with an album's worth of delicious funk-rock fusion. Released in spring 1978, Come Get It! was a triumphant debut, truly the sum of all that had gone before, at the same time as unleashing the rudiments of what would become not only his trademark sound, but also his mantra, his manifesto -- his self proclaimed punk-funk. Packed with intricate songs that are full of effusive energy, Come Get It! is marvelously hybridized funk, so tightly structured that, although they have the outward feel of funk's freewheeling jam, they never once cross the line into an uncontrolled frenzy. This is best demonstrated across the monumental, eight-plus-minute "You and I." With enough funk bubbling under the surface to supplant the outward disco sonics of the groove, but brought back to earth via James' vocal interpolations, "You and I" became James' first R&B chart hit, effortlessly slamming into the top spot. "Mary Jane," meanwhile, was James' homage to marijuana -- honoring the love affair through slang, it dipped into the Top Five in fall 1978. More importantly, though, it also offered up a remarkable preview of his subsequent vocal development. With nods to Earth, Wind & Fire on "Sexy Lady," Motown sonics on "Dream Maker," the passionate "Hollywood," and the classic club leanings of "Be My Lady," it's obvious that James was still very much in the throes of transition, still anticipating his future onslaught of hits and superstardom. Many of the songs here have a tendency toward the disco ethics that were inescapable in 1978, and have been faulted as such; nevertheless, what James achieved on this LP was remarkably fresh, and would prove vitally important to funk as it grew older during the next decade. © Amy Hanson /TiVo
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Funk - Erschienen am 6. Dezember 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Funk - Erschienen am 8. Juli 2014 | Motown

Mackerlook, Kohle an Bord und megalomanes Auftreten machten Rick James zu einem Outsider in der Welt des Funk. Aufgrund der Exzesse sowohl in seinem Leben als auch in seiner Musik galt er im Amerika der achtziger Jahre als der Spinner schlechthin. Diese Box mit mehr als 100 Titeln enthält alle seine für das Label Motown gemachten Einspielungen, B-Sides der Singles und sonstige Maxi-Singles inklusive, aber im Wesentlichen handelt es sich um neun Alben: Come Get It! (1978), Bustin' Out of L Seven et Fire It Up (1979), Garden of Love (1980), Street Songs (1981), Throwin' Down (1982), Cold Blooded (1983), Glow (1985) und The Flag (1986). Street Songs ist natürlich das Meisterwerk, das aus diesem ganzen Haufen herausragt. Bestimmte Leute sehen darin das Bindeglied zwischen der P-Funk-Galaxie und dem Purple Rain von Prince. Street Songs ist ein makelloser Schnappschuss für afroamerikanische Musik zu Beginn dieses Jahrzehnts und die gelungenste Disco-Assimilation des Funk. Rick James bedient sich einzig und allein der Quintessenz des Disco, die er seinem ungeschminkten, gellenden Funk einverleibt. Zwar besteht der Zweck sicherlich darin, den Dancefloor zu füllen, die Texte sind aber alles andere als hirnlos… Vergessen Sie einmal kurz Prince und Sie werden hier erneut einen hochkarätigen Funkster entdecken, der als Einziger in den achtziger Jahren Motown mit funkiger Boshaftigkeit und neuem Sound versorgt hat. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Funk - Erschienen am 26. Januar 1979 | Motown

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Rick James' second album, Bustin' Out of L Seven, maintained his status among R&B fans, almost topping the LP chart and spawning hits in the title track, "High on Your Love Suite," and "Fool on the Street," though none of them matched the popularity of the debut album's "You and I" or "Mary Jane." James managed an effective amalgam of recent R&B big-band styles, from Sly & the Family Stone to Earth, Wind & Fire and Funkadelic, overlaying the result with his jeeringly rendered sex-and-drugs philosophy. What was missing this time was a real pop crossover -- if Come Get It! had suggested he could have the pop success of Earth, Wind & Fire, Bustin' Out of L Seven threatened that his work would find as restricted an audience as Funkadelic, and without the critical cachet. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Funk - Erschienen am 17. Mai 1994 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Funk - Erschienen am 7. April 1981 | Motown

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Funk - Erschienen am 14. März 2006 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Funk - Erschienen am 16. Oktober 1979 | Motown

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Funk - Erschienen am 5. August 1983 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Funk - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1980 | Hip-O Select

Without a doubt, Garden of Love was Rick James' most underrated release. The album went gold and was far from a flop, but Motown wanted double or triple platinum, and anything less was disappointing. And when funk fans reminisce, Garden isn't one of the albums they mention. A departure from the type of hard and rowdy funk that defined Come Get It!, Bustin' Out of L Seven, and Fire It Up, Garden boasted only one major hit ("Big Time") and was surprisingly laid-back by James' standards. The album contains more ballads than usual, and Rick uses subtlety to his artistic advantage on songs ranging from the clever "Mary Go Round" to the haunting "Summer Love." Unfortunately, some mistook subtlety for wimpiness. But make no mistake: the songs are first-rate, though they lack the type of immediacy he was known for. Those who overlooked Garden need to give it a closer listen. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Funk - Erschienen am 16. Oktober 1979 | Hip-O Select

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Funk - Erschienen am 18. Juni 2002 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Funk - Erschienen am 16. Mai 2000 | Motown

Short and sweet, this ten-track compilation hits all the high points of Rick James' career, from his 1978 number one debut single, "You and I," to the 1984 triumph "17," collecting every major hit in between while casting off James' post-1984 denouement without a second glance. But really, the casual fan looking for hits without misses won't need to go any farther than this disc. You won't find any rarities or unreleased material here. What you will find are all the songs that propelled James to peaks that glinted off the gorgeously arrayed rhinestone feathers of his "punk-funk" empire. "Super Freak," "Give It to Me Baby," and "Cold Blooded," all chart-topping heavyweights, are here. So are the equally juicy "Mary Jane" and the Smokey Robinson duet "Ebony Eyes." It would have been nice to see a few of James' other funk jams included, but that probably would have defeated the purpose of this tight budget set. For the super-freaky '80s retro-ist who's looking for snappy party favorites, 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection: The Best of Rick James will certainly give the biggest bang for the buck. Everyone else will be better served by a more complete package. © Amy Hanson /TiVo
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Funk - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1978 | UNI - MOTOWN

After returning to the U.S. from London, where he fronted the blues band Mainline, Rick James cut one album with White Cane before he turned to his own solo venture. By 1977, he'd begun working with the Stone City Band, emerging at the end of the year with an album's worth of delicious funk-rock fusion. Released in spring 1978, Come Get It! was a triumphant debut, truly the sum of all that had gone before, at the same time as unleashing the rudiments of what would become not only his trademark sound, but also his mantra, his manifesto -- his self proclaimed punk-funk. Packed with intricate songs that are full of effusive energy, Come Get It! is marvelously hybridized funk, so tightly structured that, although they have the outward feel of funk's freewheeling jam, they never once cross the line into an uncontrolled frenzy. This is best demonstrated across the monumental, eight-plus-minute "You and I." With enough funk bubbling under the surface to supplant the outward disco sonics of the groove, but brought back to earth via James' vocal interpolations, "You and I" became James' first R&B chart hit, effortlessly slamming into the top spot. "Mary Jane," meanwhile, was James' homage to marijuana -- honoring the love affair through slang, it dipped into the Top Five in fall 1978. More importantly, though, it also offered up a remarkable preview of his subsequent vocal development. With nods to Earth, Wind & Fire on "Sexy Lady," Motown sonics on "Dream Maker," the passionate "Hollywood," and the classic club leanings of "Be My Lady," it's obvious that James was still very much in the throes of transition, still anticipating his future onslaught of hits and superstardom. Many of the songs here have a tendency toward the disco ethics that were inescapable in 1978, and have been faulted as such; nevertheless, what James achieved on this LP was remarkably fresh, and would prove vitally important to funk as it grew older during the next decade. © Amy Hanson /TiVo
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Funk - Erschienen am 13. Mai 2013 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Funk - Erschienen am 21. Mai 1985 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Funk - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1978 | UNI - MOTOWN

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After returning to the U.S. from London, where he fronted the blues band Mainline, Rick James cut one album with White Cane before he turned to his own solo venture. By 1977, he'd begun working with the Stone City Band, emerging at the end of the year with an album's worth of delicious funk-rock fusion. Released in spring 1978, Come Get It! was a triumphant debut, truly the sum of all that had gone before, at the same time as unleashing the rudiments of what would become not only his trademark sound, but also his mantra, his manifesto -- his self proclaimed punk-funk. Packed with intricate songs that are full of effusive energy, Come Get It! is marvelously hybridized funk, so tightly structured that, although they have the outward feel of funk's freewheeling jam, they never once cross the line into an uncontrolled frenzy. This is best demonstrated across the monumental, eight-plus-minute "You and I." With enough funk bubbling under the surface to supplant the outward disco sonics of the groove, but brought back to earth via James' vocal interpolations, "You and I" became James' first R&B chart hit, effortlessly slamming into the top spot. "Mary Jane," meanwhile, was James' homage to marijuana -- honoring the love affair through slang, it dipped into the Top Five in fall 1978. More importantly, though, it also offered up a remarkable preview of his subsequent vocal development. With nods to Earth, Wind & Fire on "Sexy Lady," Motown sonics on "Dream Maker," the passionate "Hollywood," and the classic club leanings of "Be My Lady," it's obvious that James was still very much in the throes of transition, still anticipating his future onslaught of hits and superstardom. Many of the songs here have a tendency toward the disco ethics that were inescapable in 1978, and have been faulted as such; nevertheless, what James achieved on this LP was remarkably fresh, and would prove vitally important to funk as it grew older during the next decade. © Amy Hanson /TiVo