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Pop - Uscito il 10 aprile 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

Riconoscimenti Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Pop - Uscito il 15 ottobre 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The release of Gold Dust was inevitable, and was recorded to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the release of Little Earthquakes, the album that established Tori Amos as one of the premier -- if not the premier -- singer/songwriters of her generation. Here she revisits songs from her catalog backed by the famed Metropole Orchestra conducted by Jules Buckley. Amos recorded live with the orchestra in the Netherlands, making it a greatest-hits comp with a twist. It works. The songs keep their inherent melodies and basic arrangements, and the Metropole Orchestra underscores the inherent drama in them without overwhelming them (no easy feat). While everyone will have her favorites -- or be disappointed about those that have been left out -- the arc of the album works quite well. Songs like "Marianne" and "Yes Anastasia" are as direct and compelling as ever. The title track, with its elegiac intro, is more elaborate, yet never gives in to excess. "Precious Things" is, if anything, more militant, even as it proclaims "let these precious things be." The gospel feel in the chords that introduce "Snow Cherries from France" are quickly supplanted by a near-theatrical feel. The set closes with "Girl Disappearing" from American Doll Posse. In this arrangement, subtler shades of meaning are coaxed from the lyric by the orchestra and by more elaborate piano flourishes from Amos. Gold Dust is another of Amos' dreams realized -- to record live with an orchestra -- and it is most certainly for her dedicated fans, who will no doubt find elements in these new versions to enjoy. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop - Uscito il 04 dicembre 2020 | Decca (UMO)

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At the close of 2020, a year of unexpected change and intensity across the globe, piano maestro and singer/songwriter Tori Amos gifted fans with a four-track holiday EP, Christmastide. Returning to the seasonal realm for the first time since 2009's Midwinter Graces, Amos aimed to provide solace and lift spirits after a tumultuous year rocked by the COVID-19 pandemic, social unrest, and an ugly U.S. presidential election cycle, comforting listeners during a unique yuletide season where more families than usual would be separated by social distancing, politics, and quarantine. Joining her for the snow-covered journey are familiar faces from eras past, namely drummer Matt Chamberlain and bassist Jon Evans, who were an integral part of Amos' vision for the better part of a decade. Together, the trio conjure sonic warmth that will be instantly familiar to diehards, recalling Amos' 2000s run from Scarlet's Walk to American Doll Posse. Opening with the appropriately festive "Christmastide," Amos sets the stage with sparkling piano, the full breadth of her rhythmic duo, and angelic vocal harmony with her daughter, Natashya Hawley, before plunging into a darker and more bittersweet space with the dramatic "Circle of Seasons" and pensive "Holly," a pair of standouts that are most evocative of Amos' classic sound. On robust closer "Better Angels," Amos sings, "Oh, what a year to be here/on this little rock, third from the sun/And we need some mercy." Weary but hopeful, she beseeches the heavens to "help us, save us" as Chamberlain's drums crash atop Evans' grooves, a rallying cry to harness as much power as we can muster for a better, brighter future. Although frustratingly short -- a full album in this vein might have been her best in a decade -- Christmastide is an absolute treat and one of the better things to come of a very trying year. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Pop - Uscito il 13 aprile 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Uscito il 18 novembre 2016 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Uscito il 09 maggio 2014 | Mercury KX

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Quattordicesimo album in studio per la brava cantautrice americana, pubblicato da Mercury nel maggio 2014. “Unrepentant Geraldines” viene preceduto dal primo singolo, “Trouble’s lament”, uscito a marzo, nel quale come sempre la talentuosa artista incanta con la sua voce e il suo pianoforte. L’artista ha dato il via a un tour mondiale poco dopo l’uscita del disco, che vede anche alcune date italiane. L’album ha ottenuto generalmente critiche molto positive, segnando il ritorno alla forma dell’artista dopo quello che aveva definito lei stessa un “blocco creativo”, e ha ottenuto buoni risultati di vendite, arrivando fino al settimo posto della prestigiosa Billboard 200 statunitense. © TiVo
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Pop - Uscito il 10 aprile 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Uscito il 29 ottobre 2002 | Epic

Perhaps Tori Amos didn't intentionally whittle her audience down to merely the rabidly devoted ever since Boys for Pele, but it sure seemed that way with the deliberately abstract arrangements, double albums, and cover records. That devoted cult may be all that pay attention to Scarlet's Walk, her first album for Epic, but it marks a return to the sound and feel of Under the Pink and is her best album since then. Much was made at the time of release about its concept -- conceived as a journey through modern womanhood, when Tori herself journeyed through each state in the union -- but following the narrative is secondary to the feel of the music, which is warm, melodic, and welcoming, never feeling labored as so much of her last four albums often did. This doesn't mean it's an altogether easy listen: an intensive listen reveals layers of pain and an uneasiness murmuring underneath the surface, but it's delivered reassuringly, in croons and lush arrangements that nevertheless are filled with quirks, making it both comforting and provocative. Which, of course, is what Tori Amos delivered in her early years. If this isn't as startling as Little Earthquakes or majestic as Under the Pink, so be it. It's confident, alluring, and accomplished, luring listeners in instead of daring them to follow. And, frankly, it's a relief that she finally delivered another record like that. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 08 settembre 2017 | Mercury KX

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Per il suo quindicesimo album, Tori Amos chiama in causa il presente. Con Native Invader, l’artista americana guarda alla Natura e al modo in cui, per resilienza, si autorigenera. Un modo, per la cantante, di affrontare anche il nostro ruolo nella distruzione del pianeta e della stessa specie umana. La politica non è mai troppo lontana da Tori Amos che ha sempre amato essere un’artista impegnata. In quanto a produzione, tutto è fatto in modo da mettere in risalto la sua voce inimitabile e riconoscibile sin dalle prime battute. Ai suoi esordi, all’inizio degli anni ’90, i suoi dischi furono paragonati a quelli dei giovani Kate Bush e Elton John. Tori Amos si svincolò rapidamente da quelle influenze tutt’altro che ignobili ma che sminuivano un po’ l’originalità della sua penna. Oggi, e Native Invader ce lo conferma, la sua è una voce unica che non si cura molto delle mode musicali e preferisce concentrarsi sull’arte della canzone perfetta. Sulla melodia che fa centro, sul ritornello che si canticchia fino a tarda notte. © CM/Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Uscito il 22 settembre 2008 | earMUSIC Classics

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Pop - Uscito il 17 settembre 2001 | Atlantic Records

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 08 settembre 2017 | Mercury KX

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Per il suo quindicesimo album, Tori Amos chiama in causa il presente. Con Native Invader, l’artista americana guarda alla Natura e al modo in cui, per resilienza, si autorigenera. Un modo, per la cantante, di affrontare anche il nostro ruolo nella distruzione del pianeta e della stessa specie umana. La politica non è mai troppo lontana da Tori Amos che ha sempre amato essere un’artista impegnata. In quanto a produzione, tutto è fatto in modo da mettere in risalto la sua voce inimitabile e riconoscibile sin dalle prime battute. Ai suoi esordi, all’inizio degli anni ’90, i suoi dischi furono paragonati a quelli dei giovani Kate Bush e Elton John. Tori Amos si svincolò rapidamente da quelle influenze tutt’altro che ignobili ma che sminuivano un po’ l’originalità della sua penna. Oggi, e Native Invader ce lo conferma, la sua è una voce unica che non si cura molto delle mode musicali e preferisce concentrarsi sull’arte della canzone perfetta. Sulla melodia che fa centro, sul ritornello che si canticchia fino a tarda notte. © CM/Qobuz
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Pop - Uscito il 18 dicembre 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Uscito il 21 settembre 1999 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop/Rock - Uscito il 22 febbraio 2005 | Epic

Released in conjunction with Tori Amos: Piece by Piece, a memoir presented as a think piece co-written with music journalist Ann Powers, Tori Amos' eighth studio album, The Beekeeper, is also loosely autobiographical, a song cycle that chronicles emotional journeys through metaphorical gardens all tended by the beekeeper protagonist of the title. Good thing that this concept was sketched out in the pre-release publicity, since The Beekeeper offers nothing close to a discernible concept in the album itself. At first, songs appear to spill forward in some sort of narrative, but the liner notes divide the 19 songs into six different groups -- "gardens," if you will -- that have nothing to do with how they're presented on the album, nor do they seem to have many sonic ties, and their lyrical connections are either tenuous or obtuse. Coming after 2002's Scarlet's Walk, whose title and songs clearly communicated its concept, this willful obtuseness might seem to hearken back to Tori's obstinately difficult albums of the mid-'90s, but The Beekeeper is miles away from the clanging darkness of Boys for Pele and From the Choirgirl Hotel. This is a bright, gleaming album that retains its sunny disposition even when the tempos grow slow and the melodies turn moody. Amos even occasionally punctuates her trademark elliptical piano ballads with organ-driven lite-funk -- a move that may alienate longtime fans, who may also balk at the album's highly polished sheen, but one that nevertheless fits well into the general feel of the record, lending it some genuine momentum. If the story line or concepts of the album aren't readily apparent, individual songs make their specific points well, and the record does flow with the grace and purpose of a song suite. As a cohesive work, The Beekeeper holds together better than nearly any of Tori's more ambitious albums, but there's a certain artsy distance that keeps this from being as emotionally immediate or as memorable as her first two records. But if Little Earthquakes was an album Amos could only have made in her twenties, The Beekeeper is a record perfectly suited for the singer/songwriter in her forties -- a little studied and deliberate, perhaps a shade too classy and consciously literary for its own good, but it's an ambitious, restless work that builds on her past work without resting on her laurels. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Uscito il 17 novembre 2003 | Atlantic Records

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Pop - Uscito il 24 aprile 1998 | Atlantic Records

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Pop/Rock - Uscito il 22 febbraio 2005 | Epic

Released in conjunction with Tori Amos: Piece by Piece, a memoir presented as a think piece co-written with music journalist Ann Powers, Tori Amos' eighth studio album, The Beekeeper, is also loosely autobiographical, a song cycle that chronicles emotional journeys through metaphorical gardens all tended by the beekeeper protagonist of the title. Good thing that this concept was sketched out in the pre-release publicity, since The Beekeeper offers nothing close to a discernible concept in the album itself. At first, songs appear to spill forward in some sort of narrative, but the liner notes divide the 19 songs into six different groups -- "gardens," if you will -- that have nothing to do with how they're presented on the album, nor do they seem to have many sonic ties, and their lyrical connections are either tenuous or obtuse. Coming after 2002's Scarlet's Walk, whose title and songs clearly communicated its concept, this willful obtuseness might seem to hearken back to Tori's obstinately difficult albums of the mid-'90s, but The Beekeeper is miles away from the clanging darkness of Boys for Pele and From the Choirgirl Hotel. This is a bright, gleaming album that retains its sunny disposition even when the tempos grow slow and the melodies turn moody. Amos even occasionally punctuates her trademark elliptical piano ballads with organ-driven lite-funk -- a move that may alienate longtime fans, who may also balk at the album's highly polished sheen, but one that nevertheless fits well into the general feel of the record, lending it some genuine momentum. If the story line or concepts of the album aren't readily apparent, individual songs make their specific points well, and the record does flow with the grace and purpose of a song suite. As a cohesive work, The Beekeeper holds together better than nearly any of Tori's more ambitious albums, but there's a certain artsy distance that keeps this from being as emotionally immediate or as memorable as her first two records. But if Little Earthquakes was an album Amos could only have made in her twenties, The Beekeeper is a record perfectly suited for the singer/songwriter in her forties -- a little studied and deliberate, perhaps a shade too classy and consciously literary for its own good, but it's an ambitious, restless work that builds on her past work without resting on her laurels. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Uscito il 29 ottobre 2002 | Epic

Perhaps Tori Amos didn't intentionally whittle her audience down to merely the rabidly devoted ever since Boys for Pele, but it sure seemed that way with the deliberately abstract arrangements, double albums, and cover records. That devoted cult may be all that pay attention to Scarlet's Walk, her first album for Epic, but it marks a return to the sound and feel of Under the Pink and is her best album since then. Much was made at the time of release about its concept -- conceived as a journey through modern womanhood, when Tori herself journeyed through each state in the union -- but following the narrative is secondary to the feel of the music, which is warm, melodic, and welcoming, never feeling labored as so much of her last four albums often did. This doesn't mean it's an altogether easy listen: an intensive listen reveals layers of pain and an uneasiness murmuring underneath the surface, but it's delivered reassuringly, in croons and lush arrangements that nevertheless are filled with quirks, making it both comforting and provocative. Which, of course, is what Tori Amos delivered in her early years. If this isn't as startling as Little Earthquakes or majestic as Under the Pink, so be it. It's confident, alluring, and accomplished, luring listeners in instead of daring them to follow. And, frankly, it's a relief that she finally delivered another record like that. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Musica d'ambiente/New Age - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2009 | Tori Amos - Republic Records