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Rock - Uscito il 01 luglio 1968 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res Riconoscimenti La discoteca ideale Qobuz
None of the Band's previous work gave much of a clue about how they would sound when they released their first album in July 1968. As it was, Music from Big Pink came as a surprise. At first blush, the group seemed to affect the sound of a loose jam session, alternating emphasis on different instruments, while the lead and harmony vocals passed back and forth as if the singers were making up their blend on the spot. In retrospect, especially as the lyrics sank in, the arrangements seemed far more considered and crafted to support a group of songs that took family, faith, and rural life as their subjects and proceeded to imbue their values with uncertainty. Some songs took on the theme of declining institutions less clearly than others, but the points were made musically as much as lyrically. Tenor Richard Manuel's haunting, lonely voice gave the album much of its frightening aspect, while Rick Danko's and Levon Helm's rough-hewn styles reinforced the songs' rustic fervor. The dominant instrument was Garth Hudson's often icy and majestic organ, while Robbie Robertson's unusual guitar work further destabilized the sound. The result was an album that reflected the turmoil of the late '60s in a way that emphasized the tragedy inherent in the conflicts. Music from Big Pink came off as a shockingly divergent musical statement only a year after the ornate productions of Sgt. Pepper, and initially attracted attention because of the three songs Bob Dylan had either written or co-written. However, as soon as "The Weight" became a minor singles chart entry, the album and the group made their own impact, influencing a movement toward roots styles and country elements in rock. Over time, Music from Big Pink came to be regarded as a watershed work in the history of rock, one that introduced new tones and approaches to the constantly evolving genre. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 01 giugno 1978 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Uscito il 22 settembre 1969 | SPECIAL MARKETS (SPM)

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The Band's first album, Music from Big Pink, seemed to come out of nowhere, with its ramshackle musical blend and songs of rural tragedy. The Band, the group's second album, was a more deliberate and even more accomplished effort, partially because the players had become a more cohesive unit, and partially because guitarist Robbie Robertson had taken over the songwriting, writing or co-writing all 12 songs. Though a Canadian, Robertson focused on a series of American archetypes from the union worker in "King Harvest (Has Surely Come)" and the retired sailor in "Rockin' Chair" to, most famously, the Confederate Civil War observer Virgil Cane in "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down." The album effectively mixed the kind of mournful songs that had dominated Music from Big Pink, here including "Whispering Pines" and "When You Awake" (both co-written by Richard Manuel), with rollicking up-tempo numbers like "Rag Mama Rag" and "Up on Cripple Creek" (both sung by Levon Helm and released as singles, with "Up on Cripple Creek" making the Top 40). As had been true of the first album, it was The Band's sound that stood out the most, from Helm's (and occasionally Manuel's) propulsive drumming to Robertson's distinctive guitar fills and the endlessly inventive keyboard textures of Garth Hudson, all topped by the rough, expressive singing of Manuel, Helm, and Rick Danko that mixed leads with harmonies. The arrangements were simultaneously loose and assured, giving the songs a timeless appeal, while the lyrics continued to paint portraits of 19th century rural life (especially Southern life, as references to Tennessee and Virginia made clear), its sometimes less savory aspects treated with warmth and humor. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 17 agosto 1970 | Capitol Records

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Pop - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2009 | Capitol Records

Riconoscimenti Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Rock - Uscito il 01 novembre 1975 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Uscito il 17 agosto 1970 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Uscito il 22 settembre 1969 | SPECIAL MARKETS (SPM)

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The Band's first album, Music from Big Pink, seemed to come out of nowhere, with its ramshackle musical blend and songs of rural tragedy. The Band, the group's second album, was a more deliberate and even more accomplished effort, partially because the players had become a more cohesive unit, and partially because guitarist Robbie Robertson had taken over the songwriting, writing or co-writing all 12 songs. Though a Canadian, Robertson focused on a series of American archetypes from the union worker in "King Harvest (Has Surely Come)" and the retired sailor in "Rockin' Chair" to, most famously, the Confederate Civil War observer Virgil Cane in "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down." The album effectively mixed the kind of mournful songs that had dominated Music from Big Pink, here including "Whispering Pines" and "When You Awake" (both co-written by Richard Manuel), with rollicking up-tempo numbers like "Rag Mama Rag" and "Up on Cripple Creek" (both sung by Levon Helm and released as singles, with "Up on Cripple Creek" making the Top 40). As had been true of the first album, it was The Band's sound that stood out the most, from Helm's (and occasionally Manuel's) propulsive drumming to Robertson's distinctive guitar fills and the endlessly inventive keyboard textures of Garth Hudson, all topped by the rough, expressive singing of Manuel, Helm, and Rick Danko that mixed leads with harmonies. The arrangements were simultaneously loose and assured, giving the songs a timeless appeal, while the lyrics continued to paint portraits of 19th century rural life (especially Southern life, as references to Tennessee and Virginia made clear), its sometimes less savory aspects treated with warmth and humor. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 17 agosto 1970 | Capitol Records

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Rock - Uscito il 22 settembre 1969 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Once the backing band of Ronnie Hawkins and Bob Dylan during the latter's controversial transition from acoustic to electric, The Band—four Canadians and a singing drummer from Arkansas—cemented their unity with a generic name, and startled the rock music world with the otherworldliness of their 1968 debut Music from Big Pink. The follow-up, simply titled The Band (and fondly known as The Brown Album, is a near-perfect mix of American popular music, from country and blues to folk and rock. Recorded in a Hollywood Hills house once owned by Judy Garland, and at the time of the sessions, Sammy Davis Jr., it's one of rock's greatest albums and a foundational touchstone of today's Americana, filled with songs Rolling Stone described as "diamonds that begin to glow at different times." Often favorably compared to Abbey Road, which was released the same week in September 1969, this 50th anniversary reissue features a fresh remix supervised by Bob Clearmountain and Robbie Robertson, and is supplemented with alternate takes and demos, as well as the first official release of the Band’s performance at Woodstock. More coherent and with fewer rough edges than its predecessor, The Band's strengths are immediately audible. The likable and loping opener "Across the Great Divide," (with its unexpected brass and reed accents), followed by the barrelhouse piano romp of "Rag Mama Rag," signals the grounding and respect for the past. Animated by Levon Helm's impassioned singing, "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down," later memorably covered by Joan Baez, is Robbie Robertson's (the other members' uncredited contributions are a source of controversy) melancholy paean to the South's demise in the Civil War, and perhaps the Band's best-known singalong number. Their biggest hit single, "Up on Cripple Creek," the loopy tale of "little Bessie," who's "a drunkard's dream if I ever did see one,"—most famous as the opener for the 1978 concert film The Last Waltz—is full tilt Americana at its finest. Other standout tracks include Richard Manuel's delicate, dreamy vocals on "Whispering Pines," one of the quintet's most tender performances. As a final twist, there's the super funky closer "King Harvest (Has Surely Come)" with its building groove and Manuel and Helm's one-of-a-kind vocal performances. While none of the alternate performances are life-changing, a version of "Rag Mama Rag" with a slower tempo and fanciful piano intro is illuminating. The Woodstock performances which start out nervous and tight but grow warmer as the set wears on are highlighted by a shout from the crowd of "Where's Dylan?" before "Tears of Rage." Americana begins here. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Rock - Uscito il 16 dicembre 2002 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Uscito il 01 luglio 1968 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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None of the Band's previous work gave much of a clue about how they would sound when they released their first album in July 1968. As it was, Music from Big Pink came as a surprise. At first blush, the group seemed to affect the sound of a loose jam session, alternating emphasis on different instruments, while the lead and harmony vocals passed back and forth as if the singers were making up their blend on the spot. In retrospect, especially as the lyrics sank in, the arrangements seemed far more considered and crafted to support a group of songs that took family, faith, and rural life as their subjects and proceeded to imbue their values with uncertainty. Some songs took on the theme of declining institutions less clearly than others, but the points were made musically as much as lyrically. Tenor Richard Manuel's haunting, lonely voice gave the album much of its frightening aspect, while Rick Danko's and Levon Helm's rough-hewn styles reinforced the songs' rustic fervor. The dominant instrument was Garth Hudson's often icy and majestic organ, while Robbie Robertson's unusual guitar work further destabilized the sound. The result was an album that reflected the turmoil of the late '60s in a way that emphasized the tragedy inherent in the conflicts. Music from Big Pink came off as a shockingly divergent musical statement only a year after the ornate productions of Sgt. Pepper, and initially attracted attention because of the three songs Bob Dylan had either written or co-written. However, as soon as "The Weight" became a minor singles chart entry, the album and the group made their own impact, influencing a movement toward roots styles and country elements in rock. Over time, Music from Big Pink came to be regarded as a watershed work in the history of rock, one that introduced new tones and approaches to the constantly evolving genre. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 15 agosto 1972 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2000 | Capitol Records

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Rock - Uscito il 17 agosto 1970 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Uscito il 01 novembre 1975 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Uscito il 15 settembre 1971 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Uscito il 01 luglio 1968 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

None of the Band's previous work gave much of a clue about how they would sound when they released their first album in July 1968. As it was, Music from Big Pink came as a surprise. At first blush, the group seemed to affect the sound of a loose jam session, alternating emphasis on different instruments, while the lead and harmony vocals passed back and forth as if the singers were making up their blend on the spot. In retrospect, especially as the lyrics sank in, the arrangements seemed far more considered and crafted to support a group of songs that took family, faith, and rural life as their subjects and proceeded to imbue their values with uncertainty. Some songs took on the theme of declining institutions less clearly than others, but the points were made musically as much as lyrically. Tenor Richard Manuel's haunting, lonely voice gave the album much of its frightening aspect, while Rick Danko's and Levon Helm's rough-hewn styles reinforced the songs' rustic fervor. The dominant instrument was Garth Hudson's often icy and majestic organ, while Robbie Robertson's unusual guitar work further destabilized the sound. The result was an album that reflected the turmoil of the late '60s in a way that emphasized the tragedy inherent in the conflicts. Music from Big Pink came off as a shockingly divergent musical statement only a year after the ornate productions of Sgt. Pepper, and initially attracted attention because of the three songs Bob Dylan had either written or co-written. However, as soon as "The Weight" became a minor singles chart entry, the album and the group made their own impact, influencing a movement toward roots styles and country elements in rock. Over time, Music from Big Pink came to be regarded as a watershed work in the history of rock, one that introduced new tones and approaches to the constantly evolving genre. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 17 settembre 2013 | Capitol Records (CAP)

Not so much an expansion of 1972's classic double-live album Rock of Ages, but an exhaustive tribute to its source material, the four-CD/one-DVD 2013 box set Live at the Academy of Music 1971 digs deep into the Band's year-end four-night stint at New York City's Academy of Music. The original 18-track sequence for the 1972 LP has been abandoned in favor of a double-concert construct, where the first two discs present one version of each of the 29 songs the Band played over the course of these four nights, while the final two discs present the entirety of the New Years Eve concert that capped off this residency; this CD is remixed from the soundboard tapes, and the DVD replicates this New Years Eve concert (note that there is no footage of the NYE concert, so the music is presented with a selection of stills; nevertheless, there are full clips of the Band performing "King Harvest (Has Surely Come)" and "The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show" on December 30, which are welcome). This structure is an appealing one but invites perhaps more duplications than are necessary. The 29 songs on the first two disc contain 11 songs from the New Years Eve show -- including the four-song encore with Bob Dylan -- but the trade-off is the NYE concert is loaded with unheard versions of familiar songs: 16 of the 27 songs are previously unreleased (in contrast, the only unearthed song on the first two discs is a killer version of "Strawberry Wine"). Perhaps some of these performances are ever so slightly rougher than the accompanying ones on the first two discs, but that liveliness is part of the appeal (besides, this is hardly ragged; as enthusiastic as the Band is, they're also supplemented by Allen Toussaint's horn section, so they do need to hit their marks to ensure all the elements fit together). Rock of Ages and, in turn, Live at the Academy of Music 1971 do close out the early years of the Band. They'd tour again, supporting Bob Dylan in 1974, and they turned out a few more records before disbanding in 1976, but they never seemed as triumphant as they did at the end of 1971. Although this box is not perfect -- it's hard not to wish there were no duplications on the first two discs, or the last two -- it is nevertheless a mighty testament to the Band at the peak of their powers. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Uscito il 15 marzo 1977 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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