Il vostro carrello è vuoto

Categorie :

Artisti simili

Gli album

A partire da:
HI-RES14,49 €
CD12,49 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 04 dicembre 2020 | KRUNK

Hi-Res
A partire da:
CD22,49 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 05 luglio 2019 | KRUNK

Rock? New Age? Post-rock? Space? Progressiva? Psichedelica su Lexotan? O nastri manomessi dagli alieni? Il secondo album dei Sigur Ros mantiene nel corso degli anni la stessa sensazione straniante che si percepiva al momento della sua uscita nel giugno 1999. Come su un shoegaze, l’insieme di queste coltri elettriche di cotone impilate dal collettivo di Reykjavík hanno un originale effetto ipnotico. Come se fossero l’eco del lavoro di Brian Eno..... Ma sotto la sua veste di laboratorio sperimentale per scienziati pazzi, Agætis Byrjun (che significa “un buon inizio”) include vere e proprie canzoni sostenute da solide costruzioni armoniche. Falsetto verginale su Svefn-g-englar e il suo inebriante coro, raffinati violini all’apice di Staralfur o falso jazz stile trip-hop su Hjartao Hamast, l’opera maggiore dei Sigur Ros, è piena di idee una più seducente dell’altra. Un vero e proprio shock sensoriale celebrato qui nell’edizione per il suo 20° anniversario. Oltre all’album rimasterizzato, questa edizione include una performance dal vivo del 1999 all’Islenska Operan e molte demo. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
A partire da:
CD12,49 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 12 giugno 1999 | KRUNK

A partire da:
CD9,99 €

World music - Uscito il 13 settembre 2005 | Parlophone UK

A strange thing happens before the two-minute mark in "Saeglopur." All the twinkling and cooing erupts, at what might seem like eight minutes earlier than normal, into a cathartic blast of tautly constructed group noise -- or, as those who prefer songs and motion over moods and atmospheres might say, "The good part comes." "Saeglopur" is emblematic of Sigur Rós' fourth album, released nearly three years (!) after ( ). Nothing resembles a drone, and no part of it could be described as funereal. Even so, Takk... is still very much a Sigur Rós album, due in large part to the ever-present otherworldly vocals, but also because the only real changes are the activeness of some arrangements -- arrangements that deploy a familiar combination of bass, drums, piano, vocals, lots of strings, and some horns -- and some of the colors that are used. Despite opening with what sounds like a happy walk through a snow bank, the album is just as suited for a sunlit spring morning as ( ) was suited for a winter trudge across a foggy moor, so in that sense, it isn't a repeat and is more tactile than illusory, but it's not likely to win over anyone who suddenly felt an index finger push against the back of his throat while hearing "Svefn-G-Englar" for the first time. And it's not as if the band is suddenly writing three-minute pop songs, either. Half of the album's tracks are longer than six minutes, with extended cresting, sudden bursts of action, and a couple particularly fragile moments that seem to be on the brink of melting away. One thing to consider when wondering whether or not this band has changed in any way: they've gone from providing the background music to death announcements to "Sé Lest," a fluttering children's lullaby that is briefly crashed by an even more gleeful oom-pah-pah brass band. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
A partire da:
CD13,49 €
( )

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 28 ottobre 2002 | KRUNK

A partire da:
CD14,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 05 novembre 2007 | Parlophone UK

A partire da:
HI-RES15,99 €
CD13,49 €

Ambient - Uscito il 09 agosto 2019 | KRUNK

Hi-Res
A partire da:
CD7,99 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 28 maggio 2012 | Parlophone UK

After taking a long break from recording new material, Sigur Rós' sixth album, Valtari, is a welcome return for the Icelandic soundscape pioneers. Their previous album Med Sud I Eyrum Vid Spilum Endalaust had been their most intimate and cheerful record to date with songs that could actually be called "songs" and the band stripping their sound down to the point where you could almost pick out individual instruments in the mix. It appears that singer Jonsi took all the sunshine and most of the pop song structure away for use in his solo career, because Valtari is a return to the epically somber and sonically all-encompassing approach the band perfected on their first few albums. Filled with giant washes of sound bathed in reverb, echoing keyboards, smears of strings, and massed backing vocals, the album ebbs and flows from giant crescendos to heartbreakingly intimate moments with Jonsi's otherworldly voice riding the waves like a mythical dolphin. Each song creates its own insular world of atmosphere and emotion that can be so intense that when they end (usually after a solid six to eight minutes), the silence makes it feel like you've been yanked harshly out of a reverie. It's a shocking sensation but it speaks to how completely the band is able to transport the listener out of the day to day and into a magical realm. As is usually the case, it's a realm of graceful melancholy that comes across as a bit gloomy, until Jonsi begins to sing in his angelic croon, that is, and you are lifted. On the surface, Valtari may seem like a step back for the band, but instead of just retreading the past, the album is one of their best; a refined display of their musical power with breathtaking dynamics and enough emotion to flood an ocean. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
A partire da:
CD16,99 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 07 novembre 2011 | KRUNK

A partire da:
CD12,49 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 07 giugno 2013 | KRUNK

A partire da:
CD14,99 €

World music - Uscito il 13 settembre 2005 | Parlophone UK

A strange thing happens before the two-minute mark in "Saeglopur." All the twinkling and cooing erupts, at what might seem like eight minutes earlier than normal, into a cathartic blast of tautly constructed group noise -- or, as those who prefer songs and motion over moods and atmospheres might say, "The good part comes." "Saeglopur" is emblematic of Sigur Rós' fourth album, released nearly three years (!) after ( ). Nothing resembles a drone, and no part of it could be described as funereal. Even so, Takk... is still very much a Sigur Rós album, due in large part to the ever-present otherworldly vocals, but also because the only real changes are the activeness of some arrangements -- arrangements that deploy a familiar combination of bass, drums, piano, vocals, lots of strings, and some horns -- and some of the colors that are used. Despite opening with what sounds like a happy walk through a snow bank, the album is just as suited for a sunlit spring morning as ( ) was suited for a winter trudge across a foggy moor, so in that sense, it isn't a repeat and is more tactile than illusory, but it's not likely to win over anyone who suddenly felt an index finger push against the back of his throat while hearing "Svefn-G-Englar" for the first time. And it's not as if the band is suddenly writing three-minute pop songs, either. Half of the album's tracks are longer than six minutes, with extended cresting, sudden bursts of action, and a couple particularly fragile moments that seem to be on the brink of melting away. One thing to consider when wondering whether or not this band has changed in any way: they've gone from providing the background music to death announcements to "Sé Lest," a fluttering children's lullaby that is briefly crashed by an even more gleeful oom-pah-pah brass band. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
A partire da:
CD9,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 30 aprile 2013 | Vitamin Records

A partire da:
CD63,99 €

Ambient - Uscito il 21 giugno 2016 | KRUNK

A partire da:
CD14,99 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 28 maggio 2012 | Parlophone UK

Video
After taking a long break from recording new material, Sigur Rós' sixth album, Valtari, is a welcome return for the Icelandic soundscape pioneers. Their previous album Med Sud I Eyrum Vid Spilum Endalaust had been their most intimate and cheerful record to date with songs that could actually be called "songs" and the band stripping their sound down to the point where you could almost pick out individual instruments in the mix. It appears that singer Jonsi took all the sunshine and most of the pop song structure away for use in his solo career, because Valtari is a return to the epically somber and sonically all-encompassing approach the band perfected on their first few albums. Filled with giant washes of sound bathed in reverb, echoing keyboards, smears of strings, and massed backing vocals, the album ebbs and flows from giant crescendos to heartbreakingly intimate moments with Jonsi's otherworldly voice riding the waves like a mythical dolphin. Each song creates its own insular world of atmosphere and emotion that can be so intense that when they end (usually after a solid six to eight minutes), the silence makes it feel like you've been yanked harshly out of a reverie. It's a shocking sensation but it speaks to how completely the band is able to transport the listener out of the day to day and into a magical realm. As is usually the case, it's a realm of graceful melancholy that comes across as a bit gloomy, until Jonsi begins to sing in his angelic croon, that is, and you are lifted. On the surface, Valtari may seem like a step back for the band, but instead of just retreading the past, the album is one of their best; a refined display of their musical power with breathtaking dynamics and enough emotion to flood an ocean. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
A partire da:
CD4,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 05 settembre 2008 | Parlophone UK

A partire da:
CD14,99 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 20 giugno 2008 | Parlophone UK

Libretto
With their fifth full-length album, Med Sud I Eyrum Vid Spilum Endalaust (translated as With a Buzz in Our Ears We Play Endlessly), Sigur Rós have taken the poppy, sunshiny leanings of their previous album a step further into the light. The band has always been known for otherworldly soundscapes, and while there is enough of that here to keep the faithful happy, the band also writes straightforward, three-minute pop songs like the incredible catchy, sticky-sweet duo ("Gobbldigook," "Inní Mér Syngur Vitleysingur") that kick the album off like the first rays of the morning sun blazing through your bedroom window. That feeling continues on through the album as both the joyously soaring vocals and the buoyant melodies keep things floating happily on air. The arrangement of sound is quite different from previous albums, too. In the past their sound was characterized by a great wash of instruments merging together into great, gently heaving walls and waves of sound; on this album, for the most part, you can pick out individual instruments whether it's the acoustic guitar that underpins many of the songs (and provides the main backing on the intimate and quite lovely, and quite un-Sigur Rós-like, "Illgresi") or the lone piano that begins "Ára Bátur" (which does expand out into an epic undertaking with over 90 people including the London Sinfonietta and London Oratory Boy's Choir eventually playing on the track). Despite the few tracks that reach for the heavens, for the first time the band sounds grounded and stripped down. Songs like "Festival," with its pounding bassline and charging drums, and the melancholy album closer, "All Alright," which is based on a lonely piano figure (and features lyrics sung in English for the first time in the group's history), are firmly tethered to earth and shorn of excess artifice. In the past it was easy to be impressed with the sound of Sigur Rós, to be carried away by the grandeur of the band and be hit hard by the titanic emotions. On Med Sud I Eyrum Vid Spilum Endalaust you can really hear the human hearts behind the wall of sound, and while the emotional impact is on a smaller scale, somehow it is even more affecting. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
A partire da:
CD12,49 €
Von

Elettronica - Uscito il 14 giugno 1997 | KRUNK

A partire da:
CD9,99 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 20 agosto 2007 | KRUNK

A partire da:
CD2,29 €

Elettronica - Uscito il 19 giugno 2016 | KRUNK

A partire da:
CD2,49 €

Serie TV - Uscito il 09 maggio 2014 | Sony Classical