Il vostro carrello è vuoto

Categorie :

Artisti simili

Gli album

A partire da:
CD3,49 €

Jazz - Uscito il 14 maggio 2021 | Rubyworks Records

A partire da:
HI-RES15,99 €
CD13,49 €

Rock - Uscito il 26 aprile 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Hi-Res
A partire da:
CD10,99 €

Metal - Uscito il 02 ottobre 2020 | Rubyworks

When guitarists Rodrigo Sánchez and Gabriela Quintero released Mettavolution in 2019, it marked their first studio outing in five years. Their goal was to "reconnect with the physical rush and emotional core of the music we first made together." They succeeded. It not only charted but took home the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album. Their 92-city world tour was met with wildly enthusiastic responses. The pair claimed the jaunt "was the very moment we felt truly complete as artists and musicians." The duo planned on continuing their road sojourn in 2020, but the COVID-19 pandemic intervened. Thankfully, they recorded most of those shows. This 81-minute, double-length set contains performances of the entire Mettavolution album with select concert staples. Opener "Krotona Days" combines Quintero's rapid-fire strumming and palmas rhythms with Sánchez's extrapolated flamenco chord shapes. His leads are pure metal; they push at the rhythm while reinforcing its primacy. "The Soundmaker," from 9 Dead Alive, is more fluid here, its shifting dynamics melding folk and flamenco with hard rock's sense of narrative drama. The centerpiece of this 81-minute outing is their cover of Pink Floyd's "Echoes" as it was on the studio album. At 22 minutes, this version is both longer and far preferable. Free of the track's studio effects, the duo get to explore more of its hidden musical nuances in real time. The very moment the melody is first articulated by Sánchez, Quintero's chord voicings and syncopated polyrhythmic guitar slaps illustrate the tune's roots in English folk music -- Floyd deliberately hid them. Her athletic strumming bridges them to Mexican Regional and Spanish folk traditions in the jam's labyrinthine unfolding. Her dramatic sense allows space and texture to inform her interaction with Sánchez, who adds it to his own scalar development and adds a feint or two of his own -- including a playful nod to Nile Rogers' playing on Daft Punk's "Get Lucky." After his own pedal-heavy solo, they improvise on the changes harmonically without distracting from the core. It's breathtaking. The duo reach back to the very beginning with "Tamacun," played at twice the speed of the original with more lyric extrapolation and rhythmic power. "Hanuman," from 11:11, remains a potent flamenco-infused rocker with canny rhythmic shifts and stop-and-start turns, as Sánchez runs over the fretboard like a man possessed. "Terracentric," despite being played on acoustic guitars, is one of the best metal jams of the year. Sánchez's meaty wah-wah riffing melds major and minor scales with flawless technique without sacrificing the deep emotion in the melody. Quintero underscores, then expands the theme with mercurial shapes, syncopated guitar palmas, and mind-blowing rhythmic invention; the way she employs the guitar's body as an equal voice is not only singular, it's astonishing. Hearing Mettavolution Live back to back with its studio counterpart offers revelation. Rodrigo y Gabriela use their inexhaustible, reflexive creativity not as compensation for lack of studio control but to illustrate and communicate the beating language of the heart contained in the music itself. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partire da:
CD10,99 €

Metal - Uscito il 05 maggio 2017 | Rubyworks

A partire da:
CD8,49 €

World music - Uscito il 03 ottobre 2006 | [PIAS]

While Rodrigo y Gabriela's self-titled third album is an utter and complete joy to listen to -- actually, it's more of a riotous celebration -- it's more than difficult to describe exactly what they do. This Mexican guitar duo met while in a heavy metal outfit together and soon found the local scene wanting. Both had roots in flamenco and other folk and rock music; they dropped the electric guitars -- and bandmates -- to travel light. They headed off to Europe, and ended up busking in Ireland, where their renown spread as instrumentalists who had to be seen to be believed. They re-recorded an album, toured the U.K. with everyone from David Gray to the Buena Vista Social Club, and then cut a live disc in Dublin and Manchester. That was the story until they hooked up with producer John Leckie. He was able to help them record a studio album that captured the sheer orgiastic excitement of their live gigs, hence this self-titled puppy that debuted in the Irish charts at number one. Uh-huh. It's true that Ireland's not a big place, but when, when, have you ever heard of an instrumental recording by a Mexican duo hitting the number one spot in such a place? What's more, the disc has a buzz on Yank shores as well and with good reason. These nine cuts have nothing to do with nuevo flamenco or any of that new agey stuff: this is smoke and fire music, it burns across genres and traditions like a demented passion spirit that takes no prisoners -- and we can thank the gods for heavy metal in this instance at least. This set slashes like a stiletto; it's fine and precise; it leaves no scars. The dynamic range of this music is startling. It is both ancient and futuristic, carnally frenetic and romantically seductive, artfully -- and even spiritually -- played yet drenched in the vulgarity of street life. It is the work of two young masters who are still striving to learn and incorporate more without sacrificing beauty, pathos, and tradition. On "Ixtapa" they utilize rock & roll dynamics to perform a song about the place they decided to flee from Mexico City to before leaving for Europe. Roby Lakatos, the incredible violinist, joins the duo here (he's a fan and offered his services). Take in "Diablo Rojo," or "Satori," where metal chops, flamenco, and tango music become entwined in a musical ménage à trois. There are no gimmicks in this music, it's exactly what you hear in the immediate present that somehow comes out of the Latin historical past, is infected by rock & roll and forwards the secret histories of both. Informed by this, listen closely to the pair's covers of Metallica's "Orion" and, more importantly, the song that would be easiest to dismiss -- a reading of Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" that takes the appropriate liberties and makes them both sound fresh and new. In encountering this record, all doubt and cynicism should removed; what is happening here is that the canon for the acoustic, classical guitar is being rewritten. This music is the sound of passion as interpreted by and spoken for in a new rock & roll language. [Initial copies of the CD also come with an enclosed DVD so you can see the magic as well as hear it.] © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partire da:
CD12,99 €

World music - Uscito il 05 maggio 2017 | Rubyworks

A partire da:
CD7,49 €

Metal - Uscito il 07 settembre 2009 | Rubyworks

The very first moments of Rodrigo y Gabriela's sophomore effort, 11:11, hit the listener cold in the face, and not just because of the amazing guitar playing. Sure, it's there, but it's what anyone who heard the duo's astonishing debut would expect. No, it's the sound of the record: immediate, forceful, crystalline; it's in-your-face compelling and impossible to ignore. 11:11 features 11 new compositions, dedicated to 11 musical artists (not all guitarists, either) who have had an influence on the duo. Recorded in Ixtapa, Mexico, the set was self-produced with the exception of two cuts, which were co-produced with John Leckie. The set was mixed in Wales and London by Colin Richardson, who has worked with metal bands Trivium and Slipknot. The set opens with the striking, rhythmically complex "Hanuman," dedicated to Carlos Santana. While it doesn't work so much on the level of Santana's soaring solos, what it does do is capture the dramatic, rhythmically complex elements of his trademark style and roots him directly inside the entire lineage of great Latin guitarists. Next up is "Buster Voodoo," dedicated to Jimi Hendrix. The late guitarist's original nickname was Buster, and he wrote "Voodoo Chile," hence the title. This track is far afield from the preceding one in that it lifts elements of the Hendrix tune, and moves into a solid meld of heavy metal dynamics and contemporary Latin style -- there's even the use of a wah-wah pedal on a nylon-string guitar to excellent effect. The fuzzed-out intro to "Santo Domingo" is a rather jarring effect for a tune that is dedicated to Latin jazz pianist and composer Michel Camilo, but it's named for the city of his birth and therefore captures in sound the splendor and color of the city. The Afro-Cuban, Spanish, and Mexican rhythmic complexities shown by Gabriela Quintero are perhaps more astonishing than the stellar, even dazzling single-string work by Rodrigo Sanchez. "Atman," dedicated to the late Dimebag Darrell of Pantera and Damageplan, features a searing guest appearance by Testament guitarist Alex Skolnick and is truly one of the high points on the recording. It is also a terrific reminder that Rodrigo y Gabriela began their musical careers as electric guitarists in heavy metal bands. Other standout tracks include "Master Maqui," with acoustic solos by Strunz & Farah; "Hora Zero," inspired by -- and dedicated to -- Argentinean composer Astor Piazzolla; and "Savitri," dedicated to the John McLaughlin-led acoustic trio Shakti. The set whispers to a close -- in sharp contrast to its beginning -- with the title track, dedicated to Pink Floyd and featuring the piano work of Edgardo Pineda Sanchez. Throughout, Rodrigo y Gabriela showcase their metal chops as part and parcel of their Mexican guitar heritage. They've not simply melded the two, but have created an entirely different form of music for the acoustic guitar in the process. It's also important to note that while their technical facility is indeed dazzling, this is not the reason to sit down and dig into this record; it's the music itself. It's infectious and accessible, full of pathos, intensity, passion, and color. It's dazzling because the compositions are so imaginative and tight -- a light year's growth from their debut. This music is arranged with flair, soul, intelligence, and economy; as busy and full as it sounds, there isn't an extra note anywhere here. 11:11 reveals a true musical and sonic expansion without Rodrigo y Gabriela losing sight of their strength as an acoustic duo. Awesome. [There is a Deluxe Edition of the CD that contains a bonus DVD as well. On it are interviews with Rodrigo y Gabriela, a live rehearsal, a documentary, and a tutorial for "Buster Voodoo."] © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partire da:
CD9,99 €

Metal - Uscito il 20 ottobre 2008 | Rubyworks

Mexico City's Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero must think highly of themselves as talented instrumental musicians who like to jam fast, show off quite a bit, and cater to the baser instincts of an image conscious and viscerally driven rock type audience, even in Japan. When you get past the ego driven music presented here in what must be an atypical (for them) large concert hall engagement, you can easily hear two extremely talented musicians playing to a crowd, the patrons enthusiastically responding, and everyone enjoying themselves for an escapist hour. Having said that, Rodrigo y Gabriela are impressive musicians, barely losing a beat or fluffing fretted single-line runs, percussive chords, and occasionally amplified and effects driven inserts. Their single intent is to blow you away with their virtuosic licks and riffs, and they generally succeed. One noticeable aspect of this concert is that the guitarists stop frequently during songs, as if they are gathering themselves for the next salvo while their fans go wild -- the plant...run approach. Flamenco or jazz purists likely will see through the haze of trumped up tunes, as actual improvisation, intimacy, or subtleties are avoided except in select instances. Copping licks from rock tunes, Jimi Hendrix, and a trimmed version of "Stairway to Heaven" emphasizes this point. Still there are redeeming original moments in concept, as "O.K. Tokyo" eschews a funky blues mood, the 6/8 modal "Satori" is lower key and sweeter with stairstep progressions, "Vikingman" is closest to traditional flamenco by degrees with some neat interplay, and their flash point is muted during "One" with patient constructs, pronounced musicality and better harmonics. A version of Dave Brubeck's "Take Five" sounds rushed tempo wise, but is understated, not brash, despite the fast pace. Their lone extended piece over eleven minutes, "Foc" utilizes a spritely repeat melody, stopped and started with the most dazzling display of chops. At the end of the program each presents a solo piece, where Gabriela proves the sensitive guitarist, while Rodrigo is the driving force and hot rod pilot. The operative description for Rodrigo Y Gabriela is pyrotechnics, so if speed king and queen type virtuosity (they are virtuosos) is your thing, then this should appeal to you as might Jeff Beck, John McLaughlin, Al DiMeola, or Allan Holdsworth. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
A partire da:
CD8,49 €

Metal - Uscito il 27 settembre 2002 | Rubyworks

A partire da:
CD14,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 26 aprile 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Dopo cinque anni di silenzio discografico, il duetto virtuoso di chitarristi messicani ritorna con un album ambizioso e spirituale. Mettavolution porta un messaggio di saggezza ispirato al buddismo. La “metta” è una forma di meditazione basata sullo sviluppo dell’amore incondizionato nei confronti di qualsiasi essere. Si tratta dunque di crescere nel rispetto dell’altro e nell’impegno della trasmissione di onde positive. Un obiettivo raggiunto in ciascuna delle 7 tappe di quest’album. Prodotto dal newyorkese David Sardy (LCD Soundsystem, Oasis, Nick Cave), Mettavolution ha impiegato tre anni per prendere forma, e raccoglie un materiale che è stato frutto di una lunga riflessione, affinato e sperimentato durante i concerti. Le radici latine della coppia si esprimono in Cumbé, il loro passato da metallari si intuisce in Electric Soul e da veri fan dei Pink Floyd lasciano il pezzo forte di Mettavolution al gruppo, una cover mozzafiato del pezzo Echoes, estratto dall’album Meddle del 1971. Come al solito, con il semplice ausilio delle loro chitarre acustiche e di alcuni effetti, Rodrigo Sánchez e Gabriela Quintero si spartiscono tutti i ruoli solitamente attribuiti a un’orchestra: melodie e armonie per Rodrigo, ritmi, percussioni e armonie per Gabriela. Senza compiacersi della loro abilità tecnica e senza mai dire una parola (le loro voci risuonano soltanto attraverso i cori monosillabici del pezzo introduttivo), cantano la vita umana nella sua complessità, puntando alla sua evoluzione positiva. Da ascoltare meditando. © Benjamin MiNiMuM/Qobuz
A partire da:
CD5,99 €

Metal - Uscito il 03 ottobre 2006 | Rubyworks

While Rodrigo y Gabriela's self-titled third album is an utter and complete joy to listen to -- actually, it's more of a riotous celebration -- it's more than difficult to describe exactly what they do. This Mexican guitar duo met while in a heavy metal outfit together and soon found the local scene wanting. Both had roots in flamenco and other folk and rock music; they dropped the electric guitars -- and bandmates -- to travel light. They headed off to Europe, and ended up busking in Ireland, where their renown spread as instrumentalists who had to be seen to be believed. They re-recorded an album, toured the U.K. with everyone from David Gray to the Buena Vista Social Club, and then cut a live disc in Dublin and Manchester. That was the story until they hooked up with producer John Leckie. He was able to help them record a studio album that captured the sheer orgiastic excitement of their live gigs, hence this self-titled puppy that debuted in the Irish charts at number one. Uh-huh. It's true that Ireland's not a big place, but when, when, have you ever heard of an instrumental recording by a Mexican duo hitting the number one spot in such a place? What's more, the disc has a buzz on Yank shores as well and with good reason. These nine cuts have nothing to do with nuevo flamenco or any of that new agey stuff: this is smoke and fire music, it burns across genres and traditions like a demented passion spirit that takes no prisoners -- and we can thank the gods for heavy metal in this instance at least. This set slashes like a stiletto; it's fine and precise; it leaves no scars. The dynamic range of this music is startling. It is both ancient and futuristic, carnally frenetic and romantically seductive, artfully -- and even spiritually -- played yet drenched in the vulgarity of street life. It is the work of two young masters who are still striving to learn and incorporate more without sacrificing beauty, pathos, and tradition. On "Ixtapa" they utilize rock & roll dynamics to perform a song about the place they decided to flee from Mexico City to before leaving for Europe. Roby Lakatos, the incredible violinist, joins the duo here (he's a fan and offered his services). Take in "Diablo Rojo," or "Satori," where metal chops, flamenco, and tango music become entwined in a musical ménage à trois. There are no gimmicks in this music, it's exactly what you hear in the immediate present that somehow comes out of the Latin historical past, is infected by rock & roll and forwards the secret histories of both. Informed by this, listen closely to the pair's covers of Metallica's "Orion" and, more importantly, the song that would be easiest to dismiss -- a reading of Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" that takes the appropriate liberties and makes them both sound fresh and new. In encountering this record, all doubt and cynicism should removed; what is happening here is that the canon for the acoustic, classical guitar is being rewritten. This music is the sound of passion as interpreted by and spoken for in a new rock & roll language. [Initial copies of the CD also come with an enclosed DVD so you can see the magic as well as hear it.] © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partire da:
HI-RES3,49 €
CD2,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 17 gennaio 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Hi-Res
A partire da:
CD10,99 €

World music - Uscito il 28 aprile 2014 | [PIAS] Recordings

A partire da:
CD9,99 €

Metal - Uscito il 25 luglio 2011 | Rubyworks

Given the sheer excitement and fiery acoustic guitar pyrotechnics that Rodrigo y Gabriela generated with their first two studio albums, what transpires on Live in France may not only dazzle, but astonish. Recorded in five cities during their tour supporting 11:11, this 11-song set features nine performances of cuts from that album, and a solo improvisation each. The wah-wah pedal introduced on 11:11 is plentifully present here, used most effectively by Gabriela as a powerful rhythmic element on "Hora Zero" (written for Astor Piazzolla) and as a gnarly lead instrument on "Santo Domingo" by Rodrigo (written for Michel Camilo). "Gabriela Solo" begins with an intro to Jimi Hendrix's "Voodoo Chile," and indeed serves as an intro to the duo's beautiful performance of the tune dedicated to him, "Buster Voodoo." Hearing her percussive style, where intense polyrhythms are played on the wood of the instrument as much as on the strings themselves, is a mindblower. When Gabriela kicks the wah-wah pedal on, the entire track hits stun. "Savitri" (inspired by John McLaughlin and Shakti) combines tango, flamenco, and even Indian classical themes in a slightly different arrangement than the studio version. Rodrigo's fluidity is matched modally by Gabriela's seamless rhythmic interplay; she accents the ends of his lines with the beginnings of new ones. Here too, the wah-wah pedal makes a necessary appearance -- from both guitarists. Rodrigo's lead lines in the middle eight are as hefty as they are hypnotic. The reading of "Hanuman" (dedicated to Carlos Santana) highlights -- even more so than the studio version -- the deep commitment of its subject to Afro-Cuban music in his own approach to the guitar; knotty montunos and rumbas are sharply articulated in both the front line and in the rhythmic pulse. If you already have the studio recording and wonder whether purchasing this is necessary, the answer is simply "yes." The spontaneity, improvisation, and interaction between the audience and Rodrigo y Gabriela make Live in France a musical document that exists on an entirely different level than its studio companion. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partire da:
CD10,99 €

Metal - Uscito il 02 ottobre 2005 | Rubyworks

A partire da:
HI-RES1,99 €
CD1,29 €

Pop - Uscito il 10 luglio 2020 | Rubyworks

Hi-Res
A partire da:
CD3,49 €

Jazz - Uscito il 15 aprile 2021 | Rubyworks Records

A partire da:
CD3,49 €

Jazz - Uscito il 18 febbraio 2021 | Rubyworks Records

A partire da:
CD2,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 17 gennaio 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

A partire da:
CD10,99 €

World music - Uscito il 25 luglio 2011 | [PIAS] Recordings

Given the sheer excitement and fiery acoustic guitar pyrotechnics that Rodrigo y Gabriela generated with their first two studio albums, what transpires on Live in France may not only dazzle, but astonish. Recorded in five cities during their tour supporting 11:11, this 11-song set features nine performances of cuts from that album, and a solo improvisation each. The wah-wah pedal introduced on 11:11 is plentifully present here, used most effectively by Gabriela as a powerful rhythmic element on "Hora Zero" (written for Astor Piazzolla) and as a gnarly lead instrument on "Santo Domingo" by Rodrigo (written for Michel Camilo). "Gabriela Solo" begins with an intro to Jimi Hendrix's "Voodoo Chile," and indeed serves as an intro to the duo's beautiful performance of the tune dedicated to him, "Buster Voodoo." Hearing her percussive style, where intense polyrhythms are played on the wood of the instrument as much as on the strings themselves, is a mindblower. When Gabriela kicks the wah-wah pedal on, the entire track hits stun. "Savitri" (inspired by John McLaughlin and Shakti) combines tango, flamenco, and even Indian classical themes in a slightly different arrangement than the studio version. Rodrigo's fluidity is matched modally by Gabriela's seamless rhythmic interplay; she accents the ends of his lines with the beginnings of new ones. Here too, the wah-wah pedal makes a necessary appearance -- from both guitarists. Rodrigo's lead lines in the middle eight are as hefty as they are hypnotic. The reading of "Hanuman" (dedicated to Carlos Santana) highlights -- even more so than the studio version -- the deep commitment of its subject to Afro-Cuban music in his own approach to the guitar; knotty montunos and rumbas are sharply articulated in both the front line and in the rhythmic pulse. If you already have the studio recording and wonder whether purchasing this is necessary, the answer is simply "yes." The spontaneity, improvisation, and interaction between the audience and Rodrigo y Gabriela make Live in France a musical document that exists on an entirely different level than its studio companion. © Thom Jurek /TiVo