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Jazz - Uscito il 08 settembre 1965 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Libretto Riconoscimenti La discoteca ideale Qobuz - HD Audio
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Jazz - Uscito il 01 luglio 1964 | Blue Note

Hi-Res Libretto Riconoscimenti La discoteca ideale Qobuz
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Jazz - Uscito il 15 febbraio 1964 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Riconoscimenti La discoteca ideale Qobuz
This set (the CD reissue is a duplicate of the original LP) is one of the finest Lee Morgan records. The great trumpeter contributes five challenging compositions ("Search for the New Land," "The Joker," "Mr. Kenyatta," "Melancholee," and "Morgan the Pirate") that deserve to be revived. Morgan, tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter, guitarist Grant Green, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Reggie Workman, and drummer Billy Higgins are all in particularly creative form on the fresh material, and they stretch the boundaries of hard bop (the modern mainstream jazz of the period). The result is a consistently stimulating set that rewards repeated listenings. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1999 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Uscito il 30 luglio 2021 | Blue Note

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The superb 2021 collection The Complete Live at the Lighthouse brings together all of the music trumpeter Lee Morgan recorded for his dynamic 1970 concert album recorded at the legendary Hermosa Beach, California jazz club. Initially issued as a double-LP, Live at the Lighthouse was Morgan's final album to be released while he was still alive; he died tragically at the age of 33 after being shot by his common-law wife Helen Morgan outside a club in 1972. Following a 1996 two-disc reissue, The Complete Live at the Lighthouse presents everything Morgan recorded during his three-day stint at the Lighthouse from July 10 to 12, 1970. Joining him was his stellar ensemble of the time featuring saxophonist Bennie Maupin, pianist Harold Mabern, bassist Jymie Merritt, and drummer Mickey Roker. Also featured is drummer Jack DeJohnette, who sits in on a version of Morgan's classic "Speedball." An innovative firebrand with a blistering attack and unerring sense of rhythm, Morgan soared to career heights in the '60s, first as a member of the Jazz Messengers and then on his own with landmark albums like 1963's Sidewinder and 1966's Search for the New Land; bold hard bop dates that introduced his soulful, boogaloo jazz sound. By the time he stepped on-stage at the Lighthouse he had already begun to expand his sound, delving into expansive modal harmonies and flirting with edgier free jazz improvisations. All of this is on display here, especially on tracks like Maupin's dreamlike "Neophilia" and Merrit's roiling "Nommo," the latter of which plays like a spatter-paint tone-poem version of Morgan's "Sidewinder." We also get a swaggering, funky reading of that classic song that reveals just how much the growing fusion and soul-jazz movements of the era were informing Morgan's work. While 1972's The Last Session would arrive posthumously as Morgan's final creative statement, The Complete Live at the Lighthouse captures him at the raw transcendency of what should have been the second half of his career, giving brilliant flashes of the bold artistic directions he might have taken. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 08 settembre 1965 | Blue Note (BLU)

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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1998 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Uscito il 18 novembre 1957 | Blue Note

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Recorded when he was only 19, Candy was one of the first albums (along with The Cooker, recorded the same year) where Lee Morgan showed his own unique style. His prodigal technical virtuosity had already been proven at this time in the Dizzy Gilliespie band, but Morgan's first solo ventures had been remarkable only because of his young age. Here, the influence of some of Morgan's mentors can be seen, but instead of just emulating the style of older trumpeters like Clifford Brown, he has begun absorbing bits and pieces of the phrasing and style of a wide range of musicians, from Gillespie to Miles Davis, then using them to forge his own sound. Morgan places himself front and center here -- there are no other horns to carry the melodic lines, leaving him quite exposed, but he manages to perform beautifully. Not merely a technical marvel, his tone on this album was sweet and his playing fluid, infused with joy and crisply articulated emotion. Morgan would later turn out to be an expert songwriter, but here songs like Buddy Johnson's "Since I Fell for You," and Jimmy Heath's "C.T.A." gave him ample space to show off his talents. © Stacia Proefrock /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1996 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Uscito il 29 settembre 1957 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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The trumpeter, then just 19, teams up with baritonist Pepper Adams, pianist Bobby Timmons, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones for a particularly strong set that is highlighted by a lengthy and fiery "Night in Tunisia," "Lover Man" and a rapid rendition of "Just One of Those Things." Morgan plays remarkably well for his age (already ranking just below Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis), making this an essential acquisition. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1965 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Lee Morgan was the leading trumpeter in hard bop during the 1960s and he recorded quite a few classic albums for Blue Note. This is one of them. The CD reissue (which adds an alternate take of the title cut to the original five-song program) features Morgan at his best, whether playing his memorable blues "Speed Ball," an explorative ballad version of "You Go to My Head," a lengthy "The Gigolo," or his other two originals ("Yes I Can, No You Can't" and "Trapped"). There are no weak selections on this set and the playing by the leader, Wayne Shorter on tenor, pianist Harold Mabern, bassist Bob Cranshaw, and drummer Billy Higgins is beyond any serious criticism. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 30 luglio 2021 | Blue Note

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The superb 2021 collection The Complete Live at the Lighthouse brings together all of the music trumpeter Lee Morgan recorded for his dynamic 1970 concert album recorded at the legendary Hermosa Beach, California jazz club. Initially issued as a double-LP, Live at the Lighthouse was Morgan's final album to be released while he was still alive; he died tragically at the age of 33 after being shot by his common-law wife Helen Morgan outside a club in 1972. Following a 1996 two-disc reissue, The Complete Live at the Lighthouse presents everything Morgan recorded during his three-day stint at the Lighthouse from July 10 to 12, 1970. Joining him was his stellar ensemble of the time featuring saxophonist Bennie Maupin, pianist Harold Mabern, bassist Jymie Merritt, and drummer Mickey Roker. Also featured is drummer Jack DeJohnette, who sits in on a version of Morgan's classic "Speedball." An innovative firebrand with a blistering attack and unerring sense of rhythm, Morgan soared to career heights in the '60s, first as a member of the Jazz Messengers and then on his own with landmark albums like 1963's Sidewinder and 1966's Search for the New Land; bold hard bop dates that introduced his soulful, boogaloo jazz sound. By the time he stepped on-stage at the Lighthouse he had already begun to expand his sound, delving into expansive modal harmonies and flirting with edgier free jazz improvisations. All of this is on display here, especially on tracks like Maupin's dreamlike "Neophilia" and Merrit's roiling "Nommo," the latter of which plays like a spatter-paint tone-poem version of Morgan's "Sidewinder." We also get a swaggering, funky reading of that classic song that reveals just how much the growing fusion and soul-jazz movements of the era were informing Morgan's work. While 1972's The Last Session would arrive posthumously as Morgan's final creative statement, The Complete Live at the Lighthouse captures him at the raw transcendency of what should have been the second half of his career, giving brilliant flashes of the bold artistic directions he might have taken. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 21 aprile 1965 | EMI Music Japan Inc.

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To follow up on his unexpected boogaloo hit "The Sidewinder," Lee Morgan recorded Andrew Hill's somewhat similar "The Rumproller" but this time the commercial magic was not there. However the trumpeter, tenor-saxophonist Joe Henderson, pianist Ronnie Mathews, bassist Victor Sproles and drummer Billy Higgins all play quite well on the title cut, two of Morgan's songs (the bossa nova "Eclipso" is somewhat memorable), a ballad tribute to Billie Holiday and Wayne Shorter's "Edda." This album is worth picking up but it is not essential. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1988 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2002 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1966 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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As Lee Morgan's career moved from hard and post-bop to soul-jazz, Delightfulee serves as a further bridge in a half-and-half fashion. Four of the seven cuts feature his potent quintet with a young and emerging tenor saxophonist, Joe Henderson, as his front line mate, McCoy Tyner ever brilliant on piano, and Billy Higgins firing up the rhythm as only the drummer could. The remainder of the date consists of tracks orchestrated by Oliver Nelson featuring an 11-piece ensemble. There are two selections that feature versions of compositions with both configurations. "Zambia" is a post-bop classic in Morgan's repertoire, sporting a memorable, concise, no-nonsense melody line punctuated by Tyner's piano chords, but in big-band style, it is full and rich, maybe too much so. The easy, deep waltz "Delightful Deggie," may benefit from the orchestration. Wayne Shorter is the featured tenor on the larger group tracks, while saxophonists Danny Bank and Phil Woods (both doubling on flute, a rarity for Woods),trombonist Tom McIntosh, tuba player Don Butterfield,and French Horn icon James Buffington supply the depth. The drummer for the big-and cuts is Philly Joe Jones, and again, is quite a contrast to the smoother Higgins. Of the small ensemble cuts, the fun calypso boogaloo "Ca-Lee-So" is a postscript for Morgan's big hit "The Sidewinder," recorded three years prior. Tyner strokes out kinetic forms during "Nite Flite," and dips into deep blues for "Deggie." Morgan and Henderson's solos are always spot on. The best big-band track, "Sunrise, Sunset" from Fiddler on the Roof, is extremely hip and features a relaxed Shorter, while the worst, a somber samba take on the Beatles' "Yesterday," seems a throwaway. For some this will always be an oddball release of Morgan's, but it does suggest moving on into what would be a fruitful and successful final five years. [The RVG edition, released in 2007, features remastered sound and four bonus tracks.] © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1995 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Uscito il 29 novembre 1966 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

This long-lost Lee Morgan session was not released for the first time until it was discovered in the Blue Note vaults by Michael Cuscuna in 1984; it has still not been reissued on CD. Originals by Cal Massey, Duke Pearson ("Is That So") and Walter Davis, in addition to a couple of surprising pop tunes ("What Not My Love" and "Once in My Lifetime") and Morgan's title cut, are well-played by the quintet (which includes the trumpeter/leader, Hank Mobley on tenor, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Billy Higgins). Much of the music is reminiscent of The Jazz Messengers and that may have been the reason that it was lost in the shuffle for Morgan was soon investigating modal-oriented tunes. Despite its neglect, this is a fine session that Lee Morgan and hard bop fans will want. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 29 novembre 1966 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

This long-lost Lee Morgan session was not released for the first time until it was discovered in the Blue Note vaults by Michael Cuscuna in 1984; it has still not been reissued on CD. Originals by Cal Massey, Duke Pearson ("Is That So") and Walter Davis, in addition to a couple of surprising pop tunes ("What Not My Love" and "Once in My Lifetime") and Morgan's title cut, are well-played by the quintet (which includes the trumpeter/leader, Hank Mobley on tenor, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Billy Higgins). Much of the music is reminiscent of The Jazz Messengers and that may have been the reason that it was lost in the shuffle for Morgan was soon investigating modal-oriented tunes. Despite its neglect, this is a fine session that Lee Morgan and hard bop fans will want. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1997 | Blue Note Records