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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2005 | Relentless - Virgin

Riconoscimenti Mercury Prize Selection
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Rock - Uscito il 19 dicembre 2004 | Relentless - Virgin

Perhaps it's inevitable that K.T. Tunstall's Eye to the Telescope will draw initial comparisons to Dido, since they're both female adult alternative singer/songwriters who bear a certain similarity in their vocal timbres. But as Tunstall's debut starts to unfold, those superficial connections fall away, as she reveals herself to be a soulful vocalist, a restless musician, and a serious songwriter. At times, she may be on the verge of being a little too serious, as her songs are tightly wound and earnest, two qualities that can seem slightly stuffy when her production has a glossy veneer, as it does on opening songs of the album. These cuts, while accomplished and enjoyable, paint Tunstall as a good but ordinary songwriter, halfway between Dido's elegantly sleepy soundscapes and Sheryl Crow's tuneful craft, which is an inaccurate impression, as the album quickly proves. About a third of the way in, the album kicks into gear and Tunstall is revealed as a kindred spirit of such eccentric contemporaries as Fiona Apple and Nelly Furtado. She's more straightforward than either Apple or Furtado, partially due to the album's overly slick production, but also in her sober, uncluttered songwriting, yet her musical instincts, along with her impassioned vocals, edge her out of the mainstream. Slower songs like "False Alarm" aren't sleepy; they have the lazy, jazzy undercurrents of Jeff Buckley and Radiohead, while faster cuts like the single "Black Horse and the Cherry Tree" or "Suddenly I See" have an urgency that makes them compelling, despite the shiny production. But that production is the only drawback on Eye to the Telescope -- it certainly sounds good, it certainly sounds professional, but it may keep some listeners at a distance, since it requires that they look hard to find the unique songwriter beneath the glistening surface. And if they spend the time to really hear what's going on in Eye to the Telescope, they'll find a promising, satisfying debut. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2007 | Relentless - Virgin

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 10 giugno 2013 | Virgin Records Ltd

On her Blue Note debut, KT Tunstall does a musical about face from the bright, shiny production and uptempo pop of 2010's Tiger Suit and 2007's sparkling Drastic Fantastic. Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon is a gentler, more organic collection. The split title reflects the album's linked themes of mortality (the death of her father) and the end of love (a divorce), and the two different sessions helmed by Howe Gelb in the Tucson desert during the spring and winter of 2012. The shifting signifiers in her lyrics and the subtleties of these simple yet effective melodies required an empathic, intuitive producer who would color and highlight rather than define. Together, they deliver ig. Despite using occasional strings, steel drums euphonium, woodwinds, and even a mellotron, this is not a slick affair. In fact, it's easily the warmest, most natural-sounding record in her catalog. Despite the weighty life events that inspired the songs, this is hardly a "dark" album. It's serious and looks deep; its songs find truth in unlikely places, but they never despair. "Made of Glass" is a soulful waltz in which the protagonist reveals her weariness in grieving -- but accepts it as process and transition. Colored by an elegant vibraphone, pedal steel, whistling that could have come from a Morricone score, winds, and brass, Tunstall's voice glides through the mix, embracing the tension between sorrow and waiting for its end. The single "Feel It All" -- which also has a reprise "Band Jam" version as a bonus track -- is spare, bluesy, desert Americana. Acoustic and electric guitars come together and separate in sultry contrast. John Parish's shuffling snare and kick drum walk it out as Tunstall expresses the wide-open, raw tenderness the heart encounters as it embarks upon a new reality fraught with dangerous possibilities. Her lyric expresses that vulnerability is not just the cost of humanity, but its gift. The vocal duet between Tunstall and Gelb on "Chimes," caressed by accordion, Spanish guitar, and reverbed strings, is the most delicate, lovely tune here. "No Better Shoulder" commences as a shimmering acoustic ballad, but evolves, becoming a vast psychedelic expanse of layered textures, near sultry enveloping reverb, and ambient spaces, as it unhurriedly builds to a careening climax. Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon details emotional and mental states in the stages of transition from grief to acceptance and looking forward; but the constant thread running through this beautiful set is that the core experience of loss is necessary -- and even welcome -- in order to celebrate "…the table of this life." © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2006 | Relentless - Virgin

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Rock - Uscito il 13 luglio 2018 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Uscito il 10 settembre 2007 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

A partire da:
CD13,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 19 dicembre 2004 | Relentless - Virgin

Perhaps it's inevitable that K.T. Tunstall's Eye to the Telescope will draw initial comparisons to Dido, since they're both female adult alternative singer/songwriters who bear a certain similarity in their vocal timbres. But as Tunstall's debut starts to unfold, those superficial connections fall away, as she reveals herself to be a soulful vocalist, a restless musician, and a serious songwriter. At times, she may be on the verge of being a little too serious, as her songs are tightly wound and earnest, two qualities that can seem slightly stuffy when her production has a glossy veneer, as it does on opening songs of the album. These cuts, while accomplished and enjoyable, paint Tunstall as a good but ordinary songwriter, halfway between Dido's elegantly sleepy soundscapes and Sheryl Crow's tuneful craft, which is an inaccurate impression, as the album quickly proves. About a third of the way in, the album kicks into gear and Tunstall is revealed as a kindred spirit of such eccentric contemporaries as Fiona Apple and Nelly Furtado. She's more straightforward than either Apple or Furtado, partially due to the album's overly slick production, but also in her sober, uncluttered songwriting, yet her musical instincts, along with her impassioned vocals, edge her out of the mainstream. Slower songs like "False Alarm" aren't sleepy; they have the lazy, jazzy undercurrents of Jeff Buckley and Radiohead, while faster cuts like the single "Black Horse and the Cherry Tree" or "Suddenly I See" have an urgency that makes them compelling, despite the shiny production. But that production is the only drawback on Eye to the Telescope -- it certainly sounds good, it certainly sounds professional, but it may keep some listeners at a distance, since it requires that they look hard to find the unique songwriter beneath the glistening surface. And if they spend the time to really hear what's going on in Eye to the Telescope, they'll find a promising, satisfying debut. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
A partire da:
CD8,49 €

Pop - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2007 | Relentless - Virgin

A partire da:
CD13,99 €

Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 10 giugno 2013 | Virgin Records Ltd

On her Blue Note debut, KT Tunstall does a musical about face from the bright, shiny production and uptempo pop of 2010's Tiger Suit and 2007's sparkling Drastic Fantastic. Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon is a gentler, more organic collection. The split title reflects the album's linked themes of mortality (the death of her father) and the end of love (a divorce), and the two different sessions helmed by Howe Gelb in the Tucson desert during the spring and winter of 2012. The shifting signifiers in her lyrics and the subtleties of these simple yet effective melodies required an empathic, intuitive producer who would color and highlight rather than define. Together, they deliver ig. Despite using occasional strings, steel drums euphonium, woodwinds, and even a mellotron, this is not a slick affair. In fact, it's easily the warmest, most natural-sounding record in her catalog. Despite the weighty life events that inspired the songs, this is hardly a "dark" album. It's serious and looks deep; its songs find truth in unlikely places, but they never despair. "Made of Glass" is a soulful waltz in which the protagonist reveals her weariness in grieving -- but accepts it as process and transition. Colored by an elegant vibraphone, pedal steel, whistling that could have come from a Morricone score, winds, and brass, Tunstall's voice glides through the mix, embracing the tension between sorrow and waiting for its end. The single "Feel It All" -- which also has a reprise "Band Jam" version as a bonus track -- is spare, bluesy, desert Americana. Acoustic and electric guitars come together and separate in sultry contrast. John Parish's shuffling snare and kick drum walk it out as Tunstall expresses the wide-open, raw tenderness the heart encounters as it embarks upon a new reality fraught with dangerous possibilities. Her lyric expresses that vulnerability is not just the cost of humanity, but its gift. The vocal duet between Tunstall and Gelb on "Chimes," caressed by accordion, Spanish guitar, and reverbed strings, is the most delicate, lovely tune here. "No Better Shoulder" commences as a shimmering acoustic ballad, but evolves, becoming a vast psychedelic expanse of layered textures, near sultry enveloping reverb, and ambient spaces, as it unhurriedly builds to a careening climax. Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon details emotional and mental states in the stages of transition from grief to acceptance and looking forward; but the constant thread running through this beautiful set is that the core experience of loss is necessary -- and even welcome -- in order to celebrate "…the table of this life." © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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KIN

Pop - Uscito il 09 settembre 2016 | Virgin Records Ltd

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KT Tunstall processed loss on 2013's Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon, mourning the death of her father and her marriage, so 2016's KIN functions as a counterpoint to that melancholy: it's a bright celebration of a new start. Tunstall relocated to Southern California and soaked up the sun, throwing herself into positivity with the assistance of producer Tony Hoffer, who previously helmed albums for Beck and Belle and Sebastian. Neither of those acts provide much of a touchstone for KIN, a record whose fleeting moody moments evoke either parts of Tunstall's past or perhaps the inspirational rallying call of Sara Bareilles but is dominated by saturated neon colors reminiscent of Tegan and Sara's new wave makeover. Hoffer pulls off this portion of KIN with aplomb, giving the music space and spectacle; from the moment "Hard Girls" kicks the album off with an insistent retro pulse, the record provides palpable sonic pleasures. Still, what gives KIN its weight is Tunstall's craft. Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon proved that she could turn inward and be gripping, but by turning that aesthetic inside out -- this is an album about embracing the outside world -- she's every bit as compelling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
A partire da:
CD13,99 €
KIN

Pop - Uscito il 09 settembre 2016 | Virgin Records Ltd

KT Tunstall processed loss on 2013's Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon, mourning the death of her father and her marriage, so 2016's KIN functions as a counterpoint to that melancholy: it's a bright celebration of a new start. Tunstall relocated to Southern California and soaked up the sun, throwing herself into positivity with the assistance of producer Tony Hoffer, who previously helmed albums for Beck and Belle and Sebastian. Neither of those acts provide much of a touchstone for KIN, a record whose fleeting moody moments evoke either parts of Tunstall's past or perhaps the inspirational rallying call of Sara Bareilles but is dominated by saturated neon colors reminiscent of Tegan and Sara's new wave makeover. Hoffer pulls off this portion of KIN with aplomb, giving the music space and spectacle; from the moment "Hard Girls" kicks the album off with an insistent retro pulse, the record provides palpable sonic pleasures. Still, what gives KIN its weight is Tunstall's craft. Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon proved that she could turn inward and be gripping, but by turning that aesthetic inside out -- this is an album about embracing the outside world -- she's every bit as compelling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD1,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2005 | Relentless - Virgin

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CD13,99 €

Pop - Uscito il 25 ottobre 2010 | Relentless - Virgin

Drastic Fantastic -- the spangly attempt at pop stardom consolidation -- didn’t catch on like it should have, but KT Tunstall doesn’t quite beat a retreat on its 2010 sequel, Tiger Suit. Sure, she’s reverted to contemplative photographs for her album art, but Tiger Suit isn’t a hermetically sealed sensitive singer/songwriter record, all quivering sincerity and strummed guitars. Fittingly for an album recorded at Berlin’s Hansa studio, where Achtung Baby and Heroes were cut, it is produced, polished, and textured, an album with movement and progression. Once the ominous opening chords to “Uummannaq Song” drift away, the song settles into a tight art-funk groove accentuated with folk shout-alongs, following no straight path to its conclusion. Tunstall takes no direct routes on Tiger Suit -- not when she slows tempos down, not when she recycles the “Black Horse and the Cherry Tree” rhythm for “Come on, Get In” -- but the twists that take her into the fuzzy glam-stomp of “Madame Trudeaux,” the whistled hook of “Glamour Puss,” the tight swirling circles of “Difficulty,” or the languid European blues of “Golden Frames” aren’t self-conscious stylizations, they’re lively and unexpected, colorful enough to grab upon first listen and rich enough to reveal layers upon repeats. As sonically pleasing as it is, Tiger Suit isn’t a mere vehicle for sound; it’s built upon Tunstall’s strongest set of songs yet, and it’s no coincidence that they’re her most ambitious, either: she may be firmly within the mainstream but she’s taking risks as a composer and record-maker, never settling into the role of the earnest earthbound folkie, winding up with an excellent album that satisfies as pure sound and as songwriting sustenance. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
A partire da:
CD13,99 €

Pop - Uscito il 25 ottobre 2010 | Relentless - Virgin

Drastic Fantastic -- the spangly attempt at pop stardom consolidation -- didn’t catch on like it should have, but KT Tunstall doesn’t quite beat a retreat on its 2010 sequel, Tiger Suit. Sure, she’s reverted to contemplative photographs for her album art, but Tiger Suit isn’t a hermetically sealed sensitive singer/songwriter record, all quivering sincerity and strummed guitars. Fittingly for an album recorded at Berlin’s Hansa studio, where Achtung Baby and Heroes were cut, it is produced, polished, and textured, an album with movement and progression. Once the ominous opening chords to “Uummannaq Song” drift away, the song settles into a tight art-funk groove accentuated with folk shout-alongs, following no straight path to its conclusion. Tunstall takes no direct routes on Tiger Suit -- not when she slows tempos down, not when she recycles the “Black Horse and the Cherry Tree” rhythm for “Come on, Get In” -- but the twists that take her into the fuzzy glam-stomp of “Madame Trudeaux,” the whistled hook of “Glamour Puss,” the tight swirling circles of “Difficulty,” or the languid European blues of “Golden Frames” aren’t self-conscious stylizations, they’re lively and unexpected, colorful enough to grab upon first listen and rich enough to reveal layers upon repeats. As sonically pleasing as it is, Tiger Suit isn’t a mere vehicle for sound; it’s built upon Tunstall’s strongest set of songs yet, and it’s no coincidence that they’re her most ambitious, either: she may be firmly within the mainstream but she’s taking risks as a composer and record-maker, never settling into the role of the earnest earthbound folkie, winding up with an excellent album that satisfies as pure sound and as songwriting sustenance. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 25 gennaio 2021 | El Gato Records

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Pop - Uscito il 16 giugno 2016 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2004 | Relentless - Virgin

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Pop - Uscito il 18 febbraio 2005 | Relentless - Virgin

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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2007 | Relentless - Virgin