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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2013 | Polydor Records

Riconoscimenti 5/6 de Magic - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Riconoscimenti Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 26 giugno 2020 | Polydor Records

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When their lengthy tour supporting Something to Tell You ended, the women of HAIM found themselves in inescapable crises. Alana's best friend died; Este struggled with her health- and career-threatening Type 1 diabetes; and Danielle had the double whammy of post-tour depression and her partner Ariel Rechtshaid's cancer diagnosis. They confronted these issues head-on in their life and in their music, and the directness -- and genuine emotion -- of Women in Music Pt. III adds welcome depth to their catchy, genre-mashing songs. On "The Steps," a portrait of partners who go from crashing into each other to taking it all in stride, the roaring guitar lick and honeyed harmonies can't hide the poignancy when Danielle sings "I can't understand/Why you don't understand me." "Don't Wanna," a slick blend of warm '70s atmosphere and peppy brass hits straight out of late-'80s pop, is just as vulnerable as "FUBT," which strips its fears and devotion down to just Danielle's voice and guitar. HAIM document every step of their journey on Women in Music Pt. III with an unflinching honesty that reaps rich rewards. They sound intimately familiar with depression in all its states, whether they're turning away from the wearying, pointless challenge to prove themselves to men in media and the music industry on "Man from the Magazine," sinking into isolation on the oddly comforting standout "I Know Alone," or emerging from the darkness on "Now I'm in It," a slow-building anthem that could be the album's statement of purpose. Women in Music Pt. III's creative process echoes its feeling of growing agency. For the first time, Danielle took on production duties alongside Rechtshaid and Rostam Batmanglij, and impressionistic touches like the seagulls and alarm clocks that embellish "Up from a Dream" or the way the guitar and saxophones drift through "Los Angeles" echo Batmanglij's dreamy musical memoir Half-Light. HAIM let each song and each mood be exactly what it needs to be, making for a collection of moments that are more interesting and real than if they'd attempted a more uniform sound across the album. The band's love for the '90s is as strong as ever on the Roxette-like "Another Try" and "3 AM"'s flirty homage to the era's R&B. Their singer/songwriter and folk-pop roots get their due on "Hallelujah" and the gorgeous "Leaning on You," a pair of songs that unite the sisters' voices and struggles in perfect harmony. The lightness HAIM use to combat the heavy things going on in their lives reaches its peak at the album's end: Written in the wake of Rechtshaid's diagnosis, "Summer Girl," taps into memories of the good times to get through the bad ones and borrows the effortlessness of Lou Reed's "Walk on the Wild Side," but trades that song's aloofness for unconditional love. Sprawling and intimate, breezy and affecting, Women in Music Pt. III is a low-key triumph. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 03 marzo 2020 | Polydor Records

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 07 luglio 2017 | Polydor Records

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During the years between Days Are Gone and Something to Tell You, Haim entered their mature phase -- which is saying something, since the '80s and '90s mainstream pop that makes up the backbone of their music isn't exactly impetuous-sounding to begin with. But where the Haim sisters made those influences seem not just fresh but inventive on their debut, this time they embrace their straightforwardness. More than ever, Haim calls to mind Sheryl Crow, Shania Twain, Amy Grant, and the era's other chart-toppers. They sound uncannily like Wilson Phillips on "Found It in Silence"'s crisply empowering pop, and could pass for Fleetwood Mac on the throaty confessions of "Nothing's Wrong." Something to Tell You's best songs use this baked-in familiarity in equally reassuring and satisfying ways: As it strikes the perfect balance between heartfelt and glossy, the chorus of "Want You Back" feels like returning to an old flame's arms. "Little of Your Love" and its perfectly timed breakdown are a testament to how well Haim uses pop's most reliable tricks, while the irresistible beats and guitars on "Kept Me Crying" feel like a sadder, wiser callback to "The Wire," proving that while there's nothing as audacious as "My Song 5" here, the band hasn't extinguished its spark entirely. Too often, though, Something to Tell You crosses the line from familiar to predictable. Haim pairs ultra-smooth sounds with lyrics about love gone wrong that sound more than a little samey on the title track and "You Never Knew." And while Days Are Gone had hooks for days, this time Haim's songwriting just isn't as attention-getting; production flourishes such as the processed backing vocals on "Ready for You" and "Right Now"'s artfully rough guitars threaten to overpower the songs themselves. Moments like these add to the feeling that Haim are more focused on craft than excitement. The ways they refashioned vintage pop on Days Are Gone felt risky, but Something to Tell You offers safer, smaller pleasures. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 26 giugno 2020 | Polydor Records

When their lengthy tour supporting Something to Tell You ended, the women of HAIM found themselves in inescapable crises. Alana's best friend died; Este struggled with her health- and career-threatening Type 1 diabetes; and Danielle had the double whammy of post-tour depression and her partner Ariel Rechtshaid's cancer diagnosis. They confronted these issues head-on in their life and in their music, and the directness -- and genuine emotion -- of Women in Music Pt. III adds welcome depth to their catchy, genre-mashing songs. On "The Steps," a portrait of partners who go from crashing into each other to taking it all in stride, the roaring guitar lick and honeyed harmonies can't hide the poignancy when Danielle sings "I can't understand/Why you don't understand me." "Don't Wanna," a slick blend of warm '70s atmosphere and peppy brass hits straight out of late-'80s pop, is just as vulnerable as "FUBT," which strips its fears and devotion down to just Danielle's voice and guitar. HAIM document every step of their journey on Women in Music Pt. III with an unflinching honesty that reaps rich rewards. They sound intimately familiar with depression in all its states, whether they're turning away from the wearying, pointless challenge to prove themselves to men in media and the music industry on "Man from the Magazine," sinking into isolation on the oddly comforting standout "I Know Alone," or emerging from the darkness on "Now I'm in It," a slow-building anthem that could be the album's statement of purpose. Women in Music Pt. III's creative process echoes its feeling of growing agency. For the first time, Danielle took on production duties alongside Rechtshaid and Rostam Batmanglij, and impressionistic touches like the seagulls and alarm clocks that embellish "Up from a Dream" or the way the guitar and saxophones drift through "Los Angeles" echo Batmanglij's dreamy musical memoir Half-Light. HAIM let each song and each mood be exactly what it needs to be, making for a collection of moments that are more interesting and real than if they'd attempted a more uniform sound across the album. The band's love for the '90s is as strong as ever on the Roxette-like "Another Try" and "3 AM"'s flirty homage to the era's R&B. Their singer/songwriter and folk-pop roots get their due on "Hallelujah" and the gorgeous "Leaning on You," a pair of songs that unite the sisters' voices and struggles in perfect harmony. The lightness HAIM use to combat the heavy things going on in their lives reaches its peak at the album's end: Written in the wake of Rechtshaid's diagnosis, "Summer Girl," taps into memories of the good times to get through the bad ones and borrows the effortlessness of Lou Reed's "Walk on the Wild Side," but trades that song's aloofness for unconditional love. Sprawling and intimate, breezy and affecting, Women in Music Pt. III is a low-key triumph. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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During the years between Days Are Gone and Something to Tell You, Haim entered their mature phase -- which is saying something, since the '80s and '90s mainstream pop that makes up the backbone of their music isn't exactly impetuous-sounding to begin with. But where the Haim sisters made those influences seem not just fresh but inventive on their debut, this time they embrace their straightforwardness. More than ever, Haim calls to mind Sheryl Crow, Shania Twain, Amy Grant, and the era's other chart-toppers. They sound uncannily like Wilson Phillips on "Found It in Silence"'s crisply empowering pop, and could pass for Fleetwood Mac on the throaty confessions of "Nothing's Wrong." Something to Tell You's best songs use this baked-in familiarity in equally reassuring and satisfying ways: As it strikes the perfect balance between heartfelt and glossy, the chorus of "Want You Back" feels like returning to an old flame's arms. "Little of Your Love" and its perfectly timed breakdown are a testament to how well Haim uses pop's most reliable tricks, while the irresistible beats and guitars on "Kept Me Crying" feel like a sadder, wiser callback to "The Wire," proving that while there's nothing as audacious as "My Song 5" here, the band hasn't extinguished its spark entirely. Too often, though, Something to Tell You crosses the line from familiar to predictable. Haim pairs ultra-smooth sounds with lyrics about love gone wrong that sound more than a little samey on the title track and "You Never Knew." And while Days Are Gone had hooks for days, this time Haim's songwriting just isn't as attention-getting; production flourishes such as the processed backing vocals on "Ready for You" and "Right Now"'s artfully rough guitars threaten to overpower the songs themselves. Moments like these add to the feeling that Haim are more focused on craft than excitement. The ways they refashioned vintage pop on Days Are Gone felt risky, but Something to Tell You offers safer, smaller pleasures. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2014 | Polydor Records

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 19 giugno 2017 | Polydor Records

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 18 dicembre 2020 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2012 | Polydor Records

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