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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 05 ottobre 2018 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res Riconoscimenti 4F de Télérama
Il manico di una chitarra tenuto dalla mano di un corpo contro cui è appoggiato un bambino di cui si intravede la testa. Sulla copertina del suo decimo album, Cat Power dice un bel po’ di cose. L’americana si riappropria della sua arte – anche se non può fare a meno di inserirvi una cover, quella di Stay di Rihanna – e allude al fatto di essere diventata madre. A 46 anni, Chan Marshall sembra stare… meglio? Bene? Non che la sua vita costellata di disordini interiori, fughe, trasferimenti, depressioni e dipendenze sia ormai un lungo fiume tranquillo ma Wanderer contiene alcune delle sue canzoni più belle. Delle composizioni che avanzano spesso spoglie. Un semplice pianoforte, qualche nota di chitarra, una batteria famelica. Il motto less is more brilla di mille fuochi. La voglia, forse, di riallacciarsi ai vecchi maestri del folk e del blues, come lascia intendere il brano a cappella posto in apertura, che dà il titolo al disco. Aver messo al mondo un figlio sotto l’era di Trump le ha dato senz’altro da pensare… Peraltro erano secoli che Cat Power non cantava così bene. Quella sua tonalità dagli accenti soul, riconoscibile sin dalla prima sillaba, tocca qui vette sublimi. Dopo la parentesi un tantino elettronica di Sun mixato da Zdar dei Cassius, questo album non stupisce tanto per la forma, tutto sommato classica, quanto per il livello e il tenore delle composizioni. E quando Cat Power invita una sua grande fan, Lana Del Rey, nei cori di Woman, conserva la sua sobrietà che è poi l’elemento predominante di questo disco bello e visceralmente onesto… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 24 gennaio 2006 | Matador

Riconoscimenti La discoteca ideale Qobuz
The Greatest (no, it's not a hits collection) makes it clear just how much Chan Marshall grows with each album she releases. Three years on from You Are Free, she sounds reinvented yet again: Marshall returned to Memphis, TN -- where she recorded What Would the Community Think nearly a decade earlier -- to make an homage to the Southern soul and pop she listened to as a young girl. Working with great Memphis soul musicians such as Mabon "Teenie" Hodges, Leroy "Flick" Hodges, and Dave Smith, she crafted an album that is even more focused and accessible than You Are Free was, and pushes her even closer toward straightforward singer/songwriter territory. The title track is a subtle but powerful statement of purpose: with its lush, "Moon River" strings and lyrics about a young boy who wanted to become a boxer, the song is as moving as her earlier work but also a big step away from the angst-ridden diary-rock that her music is sometimes categorized as. Likewise, on the gospel-tinged "Living Proof" and the charming "Could We," Marshall is sexy, strong, and playful, and far from the stereotype of her as a frail, howling waif. But the truth is, sweet Southern songs like these have been in her repertoire since What Would the Community Think's "They Tell Me" and "Taking People" (You Are Free's "Good Woman" and "Half of You" are also touchstones for this album); The Greatest is just a more polished, palatable version of this side of her music. This is the most listenable Cat Power album Marshall has made, and one that could easily win her lots of new fans. It's also far from a sell-out -- The Greatest sounds like the album Marshall wanted to make, without any specific (or larger) audience in mind. And yet, the very things about The Greatest that make it appealing to a larger audience also make it less singular and sublime than, say, Moon Pix or You Are Free. The productions and arrangements on songs like "Lived in Bars" and "Empty Shell" are so immaculate and intricate that they threaten to overwhelm Marshall's gorgeous voice. And, occasionally, the album's warm, soulful, laid-back vibe goes from mellow to sleepy, particularly on "Willie" and "The Moon." Two of The Greatest's best songs show that she doesn't need to be edgy and tortured or gussied up with elaborate productions to sound amazing: "Where Is My Love" reaffirms that all Marshall needs is a piano and that voice to make absolutely spellbinding music. On the other hand, "Love & Communication"'s modern, complicated take on love gains a quiet intensity with judiciously used strings and keyboards. For what it is, The Greatest is exceedingly well done, and people who have never heard of Cat Power before could very well love this album immediately. However, it might take a little more work for those who have loved her music from the beginning. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 10 settembre 1996 | Matador

Riconoscimenti La discoteca ideale Qobuz
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 17 febbraio 2003 | Matador

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 21 marzo 2000 | Matador

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 22 settembre 1998 | Matador

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 03 settembre 2012 | Matador

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 21 gennaio 2008 | Matador

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 09 dicembre 2008 | Matador

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 24 gennaio 2006 | Matador

The Greatest (no, it's not a hits collection) makes it clear just how much Chan Marshall grows with each album she releases. Three years on from You Are Free, she sounds reinvented yet again: Marshall returned to Memphis, TN -- where she recorded What Would the Community Think nearly a decade earlier -- to make an homage to the Southern soul and pop she listened to as a young girl. Working with great Memphis soul musicians such as Mabon "Teenie" Hodges, Leroy "Flick" Hodges, and Dave Smith, she crafted an album that is even more focused and accessible than You Are Free was, and pushes her even closer toward straightforward singer/songwriter territory. The title track is a subtle but powerful statement of purpose: with its lush, "Moon River" strings and lyrics about a young boy who wanted to become a boxer, the song is as moving as her earlier work but also a big step away from the angst-ridden diary-rock that her music is sometimes categorized as. Likewise, on the gospel-tinged "Living Proof" and the charming "Could We," Marshall is sexy, strong, and playful, and far from the stereotype of her as a frail, howling waif. But the truth is, sweet Southern songs like these have been in her repertoire since What Would the Community Think's "They Tell Me" and "Taking People" (You Are Free's "Good Woman" and "Half of You" are also touchstones for this album); The Greatest is just a more polished, palatable version of this side of her music. This is the most listenable Cat Power album Marshall has made, and one that could easily win her lots of new fans. It's also far from a sell-out -- The Greatest sounds like the album Marshall wanted to make, without any specific (or larger) audience in mind. And yet, the very things about The Greatest that make it appealing to a larger audience also make it less singular and sublime than, say, Moon Pix or You Are Free. The productions and arrangements on songs like "Lived in Bars" and "Empty Shell" are so immaculate and intricate that they threaten to overwhelm Marshall's gorgeous voice. And, occasionally, the album's warm, soulful, laid-back vibe goes from mellow to sleepy, particularly on "Willie" and "The Moon." Two of The Greatest's best songs show that she doesn't need to be edgy and tortured or gussied up with elaborate productions to sound amazing: "Where Is My Love" reaffirms that all Marshall needs is a piano and that voice to make absolutely spellbinding music. On the other hand, "Love & Communication"'s modern, complicated take on love gains a quiet intensity with judiciously used strings and keyboards. For what it is, The Greatest is exceedingly well done, and people who have never heard of Cat Power before could very well love this album immediately. However, it might take a little more work for those who have loved her music from the beginning. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 19 giugno 2020 | Love Supreme - Justice

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 13 marzo 1996 | Smells Like Records

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 28 settembre 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 13 settembre 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 16 agosto 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 06 dicembre 2005 | Matador

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 18 luglio 2018 | Domino Recording Co

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Musica alternativa e indie - Uscito il 09 dicembre 1996 | Matador

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Pop/Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2006 | Plain Recordings