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Pop - Uscito il 27 settembre 2004 | Nonesuch

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Rock - Uscito il 06 aprile 2015 | Capitol Records (CAP)

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That's Why God Made the Radio provided a bittersweet coda to the Beach Boys' career but the soothing sounds of the 2012 reunion didn't linger long before they were soured by the internal fighting endemic to the band. Mere weeks afterward, Mike Love announced Brian Wilson wouldn't join the Beach Boys for any dates after the summer 2012 tour, leaving Brian free to capitalize on the good press of That's Why God Made the Radio. He headed into the studio with guitarist Jeff Beck and producer Don Was in 2013 with the intention of cutting a full album but that collaboration quickly fell apart, leaving Wilson to re-team with his longtime collaborator Joe Thomas to turn these abandoned sessions into what turned out to be No Pier Pressure. Caught halfway between a back-to-basics move along the lines of TWGMTR and a star-studded extravaganza, No Pier Pressure is all sand, sun, and Saturday night nostalgia, a sensibility goosed by the addition of Al Jardine, David Marks, and Blondie Chaplin -- the part of the Beach Boys camp that threw in their lot with Brian -- who help give their numbers ("What Ever Happened," "The Right Time," "Sail Away") a bit of the classicist AM pop sheen that made That's Why God Made the Radio so soothing. Elsewhere, the album relies on guest stars to give it a bit of showbiz sheen. She & Him breeze in to deliver some Caribbean camp on "On the Island," Sebu Simonian of Capital Cities gives Brian a dance club makeover on "Runaway Dancer," and Kacey Musgraves graces "Guess You Had to Be There." By the time Nate Ruess of Fun. shows up for "Saturday Night," a throwback that seems to belong the early-'80s soft rock glory days of Carole Bayer Sager and not American Graffiti (and is the better for it), No Pier Pressure seems a fusion of Wilson's classic sunshine instincts and modern Hollywood pop. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Uscito il 27 settembre 2005 | Arista

The format for single-artist Christmas albums has remained static nearly since the dawn of the LP: a popular artist reprises his sound of the moment in a Christmas setting, sometimes mixing sacred material with secular, but always generating a time capsule that rarely holds up to repeated listenings. The Beach Boys recorded one of the best rock Christmas records of all time, and contributed an even rarer thing than a good holiday album -- a new composition to add to the canon in "Little Saint Nick." Brian Wilson's first solo Christmas album (although he did attempt a second Beach Boys edition in the mid-'70s) was recorded with the same group that made his 2004 SMiLE LP, and it shows the influence of that record. The two new songs are intriguing because each pairs Wilson with a great rock lyricist. The first, "What I Really Want for Christmas," finds Bernie Taupin thrusting some fine sentiments into a very SMiLE-like melody. The other is the odd title "Christmasey," written with Jimmy Webb, a bright song with a kinetic power that makes it the highlight of the record. Surprisingly, Wilson doesn't shy away from the sacred material -- in fact, nearly half of the songs are hymns -- and sings multiple verses of "Hark the Herald Angels" and "O Holy Night" like he's reading straight from the hymnbook (except for the excellent new vocal arrangement he writes for the beginning and outro of the former). Wilson's oddly emphatic vocals don't quite suit the Christmas concept, but the arrangements and treatments are very good; the long instrument list and sound will be familiar to Beach Boys fans who have long since memorized the credits on Pet Sounds and SMiLE. Only two choices are puzzling: "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" definitely doesn't benefit from a backbeat, and things get a bit confused on "The Man with All the Toys" when the band essays a single line from "O Come All Ye Faithful" ("let every heart prepare him room") and the listener starts wondering whether they're still talking about Santa Claus. One nice fillip for Beach Boys fans is how Wilson consciously swipes the beginning of the Ronettes' "Be My Baby" (long recognized as his favorite song) for the bonus track "On Christmas Day." © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Uscito il 05 giugno 1998 | Giant

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Pop - Uscito il 15 marzo 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Spoken Word - Uscito il 01 maggio 2017 | Lübbe Audio

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Pop - Uscito il 24 ottobre 2011 | Disney Pearl

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Il secondo album di Brian Wilson per la Walt Disney Records è segnato dalla tipica impronta della mente dei Beach Boys, il quale reinterpreta 11 classiche canzoni Disney. Lavorando con il compositore Paul Von Mertens, che ha scritto gli arrangiamenti degli archi per Smile del 2004, Wilson rende omaggio ai film di animazione Disney della sua giovinezza reinterpretando le canzoni di "Dumbo", "Il libro della giungla" e "Biancaneve e i sette nani". Alcuni dei brani sono eseguiti come complessi pezzi strumentali, mentre ad altri viene conferito il tipico sound dei Beach Boys, intriso di armonie solari e inneggianti voci in falsetto che sono tanto classiche quanto il catalogo Disney stesso. © TiVo
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Pop internazionale - Uscito il 06 settembre 2010 | Disney Pearl

During his five decades of music-making, Brian Wilson has added countless songs to the canon of great American pop music, but he hasn't recorded many by other composers. Still, his affection for the work of George Gershwin is long, and quite evident from this tribute album. In it, Wilson presents 11 classics from Gershwin's pen, and received the blessing of the Gershwin estate to finish two incomplete songs, "The Like in I Love You" and "Nothing But Love." As usual, Wilson's musical instincts are impeccable, and with a full orchestra lending additional weight to these songs, it's easily the best production on a Brian Wilson record since 2004's SMiLE. (It doesn't hurt that the lyrics as well as the music are tried and true; most of Wilson's solo output, and much of the Beach Boys' after 1967, has suffered from trite or tone-deaf lyrics.) Wilson is also in fine voice for his age, finding the pathos in "Summertime" and "It Ain't Necessarily So" during a four-song medley, and even multi-tracking his vocals for the first time on the opener, a nearly a cappella version of "Rhapsody in Blue." "I Got Plenty O' Nuttin'" is done up, as an instrumental, in full Pet Sounds splendor (complete with bass harmonica), while "I Got Rhythm" is neatly transformed into an uptempo nugget to rank with "Surfin' U.S.A." or "Little Honda." Wilson's normal studio group is augmented here with an orchestra (the arrangements and orchestrations are by Wilson and Paul Von Mertens), and they stay in the background except when needed -- just one of the many fine touches to the entire production here. Granted, Wilson's bouncy take on "They Can't Take That Away from Me" is never going to compete with Ella Fitzgerald's (or even Julie London's), and "'S Wonderful" is nearly blanded out into easy listening oblivion, but nearly everything else here is loving, sincere, and worthy of hearing by fans of the Beach Boys or Broadway. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Uscito il 01 gennaio 1995 | Geffen

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Pop - Uscito il 14 novembre 1995 | Rhino - Warner Records

Even the most ardent Beach Boys completist might have missed Orange Crate Art. Released in 1995, the album was a collection of songs written and produced by Van Dyke Parks with Brian Wilson multi-tracking the majority of both lead and backing vocals. It would be the most significant collaboration between the two massive talents since their work together on Wilson's long-obscured Beach Boys masterwork SMiLE 30 years earlier. Parks approached Wilson in 1992, and they spent the next three years slowly sculpting this album of wistful, pastel-hued odes to California. Wilson plays a largely surface role on Orange Crate Art, fleshing out some vocal arrangements but mainly serving as a mouthpiece for Parks' slippery, dreamy, and comical lyrics. Nowhere near as ambitious as SMiLE, Orange Crate Art is pleasant and less weighty, falling more in line with the off-beat quirks of post-Pet Sounds Beach Boys albums like Friends or Love You. The mid-'90s production doesn't hold up exceptionally well, with dated drum sounds and twinkly MIDI synth tones sometimes distracting from the songwriting. Recorded just a few years after a Wilson-free lineup of the Beach Boys scored a number one hit with their hokey island pop tune "Kokomo," there are hints of a similarly stifled faux-calypso style on Orange Crate Art's lesser songs. "Summer in Monterey" is tourist-trap schmaltz, and "San Francisco" is a confusing melee of canned hard rock clichés. The weakest songs sound customized for the soundtracks of early-'90s "made for TV" movies and theme park rides. Among the cornier moments, however, are some undeniably beautiful performances. The jubilant "Wings of a Dove" has the kind of flowing, elastic melody that Wilson's voice is perfect for. It's a soaring and lovely song, tapping into the innocence and wonder at the core of Wilson's artistry. "This Town Goes Down at Sunset" is a kindhearted portrait of small-town life, reveling in nostalgia and the idealized, simplistic view of the world that both Wilson and Parks often returned to in their music. While sometimes saccharine, Orange Crate Art is an interesting and often overlooked piece of Beach Boys history. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Pop - Uscito il 29 luglio 2016 | BMG

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Pop - Uscito il 22 settembre 2017 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2008 | Capitol Records

Libretto
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Pop - Uscito il 06 settembre 2010 | EMI Catalogue

During his five decades of music-making, Brian Wilson has added countless songs to the canon of great American pop music, but he hasn't recorded many by other composers. Still, his affection for the work of George Gershwin is long, and quite evident from this tribute album. In it, Wilson presents 11 classics from Gershwin's pen, and received the blessing of the Gershwin estate to finish two incomplete songs, "The Like in I Love You" and "Nothing But Love." As usual, Wilson's musical instincts are impeccable, and with a full orchestra lending additional weight to these songs, it's easily the best production on a Brian Wilson record since 2004's SMiLE. (It doesn't hurt that the lyrics as well as the music are tried and true; most of Wilson's solo output, and much of the Beach Boys' after 1967, has suffered from trite or tone-deaf lyrics.) Wilson is also in fine voice for his age, finding the pathos in "Summertime" and "It Ain't Necessarily So" during a four-song medley, and even multi-tracking his vocals for the first time on the opener, a nearly a cappella version of "Rhapsody in Blue." "I Got Plenty O' Nuttin'" is done up, as an instrumental, in full Pet Sounds splendor (complete with bass harmonica), while "I Got Rhythm" is neatly transformed into an uptempo nugget to rank with "Surfin' U.S.A." or "Little Honda." Wilson's normal studio group is augmented here with an orchestra (the arrangements and orchestrations are by Wilson and Paul Von Mertens), and they stay in the background except when needed -- just one of the many fine touches to the entire production here. Granted, Wilson's bouncy take on "They Can't Take That Away from Me" is never going to compete with Ella Fitzgerald's (or even Julie London's), and "'S Wonderful" is nearly blanded out into easy listening oblivion, but nearly everything else here is loving, sincere, and worthy of hearing by fans of the Beach Boys or Broadway. © John Bush /TiVo
A partire da:
CD17,99 €

Rock - Uscito il 06 aprile 2015 | Capitol Records (CAP)

That's Why God Made the Radio provided a bittersweet coda to the Beach Boys' career but the soothing sounds of the 2012 reunion didn't linger long before they were soured by the internal fighting endemic to the band. Mere weeks afterward, Mike Love announced Brian Wilson wouldn't join the Beach Boys for any dates after the summer 2012 tour, leaving Brian free to capitalize on the good press of That's Why God Made the Radio. He headed into the studio with guitarist Jeff Beck and producer Don Was in 2013 with the intention of cutting a full album but that collaboration quickly fell apart, leaving Wilson to re-team with his longtime collaborator Joe Thomas to turn these abandoned sessions into what turned out to be No Pier Pressure. Caught halfway between a back-to-basics move along the lines of TWGMTR and a star-studded extravaganza, No Pier Pressure is all sand, sun, and Saturday night nostalgia, a sensibility goosed by the addition of Al Jardine, David Marks, and Blondie Chaplin -- the part of the Beach Boys camp that threw in their lot with Brian -- who help give their numbers ("What Ever Happened," "The Right Time," "Sail Away") a bit of the classicist AM pop sheen that made That's Why God Made the Radio so soothing. Elsewhere, the album relies on guest stars to give it a bit of showbiz sheen. She & Him breeze in to deliver some Caribbean camp on "On the Island," Sebu Simonian of Capital Cities gives Brian a dance club makeover on "Runaway Dancer," and Kacey Musgraves graces "Guess You Had to Be There." By the time Nate Ruess of Fun. shows up for "Saturday Night," a throwback that seems to belong the early-'80s soft rock glory days of Carole Bayer Sager and not American Graffiti (and is the better for it), No Pier Pressure seems a fusion of Wilson's classic sunshine instincts and modern Hollywood pop. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2009 | Capitol Records

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Rock - Uscito il 01 gennaio 2008 | Capitol Records

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Rock - Uscito il 31 marzo 2015 | Capitol Records (CAP)

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Pop/Rock - Uscito il 01 novembre 2005 | Arista

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Rock - Uscito il 11 ottobre 2019 | Good Ship Funke