Il vostro carrello è vuoto

Categorie :

Artisti simili

Gli album

A partire da:
HI-RES16,99 €
CD14,49 €

Assoli per pianoforte - Uscito il 07 aprile 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Libretto Riconoscimenti Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Reviews of this release by Russian pianist Arcadi Volodos, as with some of his others, are split, with a large group of favorable responses and some dissenters. It's often like this with interpretations that are brilliantly executed but fall at one end of a spectrum. In this case, you can certainly find more atmospheric and passionate readings of Brahms piano music. But among those that make you understand why the 12-tone composers loved Brahms the most, not the outer chromatic reaches of Wagner or Strauss, this one is very hard to beat. Much of the music is from the end of Brahms' career, and these pieces are famous for drawing you in with their complexities and never letting you out again. Sample the Intermezzo in B flat minor, Op. 117, No. 2, where the tune is just one of the music's parameters: harmony, register, and dynamics are all tightly controlled, even as the music has a distinctive warm-hearted sadness. In Volodos' reading, there is an uncanny quality that every single note is in its place. At just over 54 minutes, the album is short, but you won't be missing the extra minutes after the feat of concentration that listening to this music entails. In places, Volodos makes Brahms sound a bit like Mompou, the composer whose music put the pianist on the map; it sounds unusual, even odd, but let it connect with you, and it's profound. Sony's production team, working at Berlin's Teldex Studio, creates a suitably inward environment. Very highly recommended. © TiVo
A partire da:
HI-RES16,99 €
CD14,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 20 maggio 2013 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Libretto Riconoscimenti Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Registrazioni Eccezionali - HD Audio
Fans of Catalonian miniaturist Frederic Mompou are used to looking in out-of-the-way places for his music: small labels, encores of recitals. Yet here he is, presented in full major-label splendor by Sony Classical, with a substantial hard-bound booklet, performed by Russian pianist Arcadi Volodos. It may be that confusing times are good for the reputation of this most inward of composers, but whatever the reason, this recording will introduce a lot of people to Mompou's fascinating world. His music is essentially a compressed version of the Impressionist language, with dashes of Satie's elliptical mode and perhaps the mysticism of Scriabin. Mompou goes further in the directions of both dissonance and diatonic harmony than did the Impressionists, and his use of simple harmony as a kind of color effect is unique in the entire concert music repertory. Some people are completely puzzled by Mompou, most of whose music proceeds at the same basic slow-to-moderate tempo. Try Volodos out! He has the knack of getting strong profiles of individual phrases while still keeping the whole thing at a sort of glimmering level. You can get a foothold with the Musica callada XV (track 20), which seems to take Chopin's Prelude in E minor, Op. 28/4, as a point of departure. From its opening figure the listener is drawn into Mompou's murky yet gentle world, which some filmmaker ought to exploit. The difficult-to-translate Musica callada (¡callate!, be quiet, mothers say to their children; "Music that Has Become Quiet" is close) is Mompou's greatest work; in it, his extremely concise language, almost completely eschewing motivic development, is brought to a fascinating extreme. Volodos has the control to get something like the last bars of Schubert's Winterreise out of the music here: it really does seem to exist on the lip of nothingness. Strongly recommended for all, and really something of a milestone. © TiVo
A partire da:
HI-RES18,99 €
CD15,99 €

Classica - Uscito il 01 novembre 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Libretto
A partire da:
HI-RES16,99 €
CD14,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 14 dicembre 2007 | Sony Music Classical Local

Hi-Res
A brilliantly played, superbly selected, and wonderfully recorded recital, Arcadi Volodos' first disc devoted entirely to the solo piano music of Liszt is a complete success. Although Liszt wrote some of the most difficult piano music ever composed, and although a lot of that music is included here, Volodos sails over any problems without deigning to notice them. The blazing double octaves, the blistering scales, the glittering tremolos, the sparkling sonorities, the giddy tempos: whatever Liszt wants, Volodos gives him. And although Liszt also wrote some of the most deliberately ostentatious piano music ever composed, and although a lot of that music is also included here, Volodos rides over any questionable moments without bothering to credit them. The crashing crescendos, the hushed pianissimos, the careening rhythms, the monstrous chords: whatever Liszt wants, Volodos gives him -- thankfully, sparing him and us from the composer's own worst excesses. Recorded in palpably present sound by producer Friedemann Engelbrecht in Teldex Studio, Berlin, in 2006, this disc will thrill any Liszt fan -- and possibly sway any non-Liszt fan. © TiVo
A partire da:
CD18,99 €

Classica - Uscito il 14 gennaio 2010 | Sony Classical

A partire da:
CD14,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 01 luglio 1997 | Sony Classical

A partire da:
CD14,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 14 dicembre 2001 | Sony Classical

A partire da:
CD14,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 02 ottobre 2000 | Sony Classical

A partire da:
CD14,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 01 febbraio 1999 | Sony Classical

A partire da:
CD7,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 11 novembre 2003 | Sony Classical

A partire da:
CD14,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 20 maggio 2013 | Sony Classical

Libretto
Fans of Catalonian miniaturist Frederic Mompou are used to looking in out-of-the-way places for his music: small labels, encores of recitals. Yet here he is, presented in full major-label splendor by Sony Classical, with a substantial hard-bound booklet, performed by Russian pianist Arcadi Volodos. It may be that confusing times are good for the reputation of this most inward of composers, but whatever the reason, this recording will introduce a lot of people to Mompou's fascinating world. His music is essentially a compressed version of the Impressionist language, with dashes of Satie's elliptical mode and perhaps the mysticism of Scriabin. Mompou goes further in the directions of both dissonance and diatonic harmony than did the Impressionists, and his use of simple harmony as a kind of color effect is unique in the entire concert music repertory. Some people are completely puzzled by Mompou, most of whose music proceeds at the same basic slow-to-moderate tempo. Try Volodos out! He has the knack of getting strong profiles of individual phrases while still keeping the whole thing at a sort of glimmering level. You can get a foothold with the Musica callada XV (track 20), which seems to take Chopin's Prelude in E minor, Op. 28/4, as a point of departure. From its opening figure the listener is drawn into Mompou's murky yet gentle world, which some filmmaker ought to exploit. The difficult-to-translate Musica callada (¡callate!, be quiet, mothers say to their children; "Music that Has Become Quiet" is close) is Mompou's greatest work; in it, his extremely concise language, almost completely eschewing motivic development, is brought to a fascinating extreme. Volodos has the control to get something like the last bars of Schubert's Winterreise out of the music here: it really does seem to exist on the lip of nothingness. Strongly recommended for all, and really something of a milestone. © TiVo
A partire da:
HI-RES16,99 €
CD14,49 €

Classica - Uscito il 07 aprile 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res
Reviews of this release by Russian pianist Arcadi Volodos, as with some of his others, are split, with a large group of favorable responses and some dissenters. It's often like this with interpretations that are brilliantly executed but fall at one end of a spectrum. In this case, you can certainly find more atmospheric and passionate readings of Brahms piano music. But among those that make you understand why the 12-tone composers loved Brahms the most, not the outer chromatic reaches of Wagner or Strauss, this one is very hard to beat. Much of the music is from the end of Brahms' career, and these pieces are famous for drawing you in with their complexities and never letting you out again. Sample the Intermezzo in B flat minor, Op. 117, No. 2, where the tune is just one of the music's parameters: harmony, register, and dynamics are all tightly controlled, even as the music has a distinctive warm-hearted sadness. In Volodos' reading, there is an uncanny quality that every single note is in its place. At just over 54 minutes, the album is short, but you won't be missing the extra minutes after the feat of concentration that listening to this music entails. In places, Volodos makes Brahms sound a bit like Mompou, the composer whose music put the pianist on the map; it sounds unusual, even odd, but let it connect with you, and it's profound. Sony's production team, working at Berlin's Teldex Studio, creates a suitably inward environment. Very highly recommended. © TiVo