Categorie:
Carrello 0

Il tuo carrello è vuoto

Jimmy McGriff - The Worm

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

The Worm

Jimmy McGriff

Streaming illimitato

Ascolta subito questo album in alta qualità sulle nostre app

Inizia il mio periodo di prova e riproduci l'album

Goditi questo album sulle app Qobuz con il tuo abbonamento

Resgistrati

Goditi questo album sulle app Qobuz con il tuo abbonamento

Download digitale

Seleziona la qualità audio

Per avere diritto a questo prezzo, abbonati a Sublime+

Lingua disponibile: inglese

Jimmy McGriff's B-3 sound was always rooted in blues and gospel, and his soloing could be very smooth and polished. But every once in a while, he had to break out of his own soul box and tear it up on a session. The Worm, issued on Solid State Records in 1968, is the very first place he did. This is the first true, all-out funky burner from McGriff, and it sounds very different from most of the other titles on his shelf. Having a band like this helps: trumpeter Blue Mitchell, tenor saxophonist Fats Theus (with Bob Ashton on baritone and Danny Turner on alto), alternating drummers Mel Lewis and Grady Tate, bassist Bob Bushnell, and guitarist Thornel Schwartz were all in their prime in 1968. The title track, written by McGriff, Theus, and producer Sonny Lester, sets the tone for the whole platter. The saxophone section lays in the cut and is prodded on in a driving, funked-up, hard soul groove by the expanded rhythm section (a B-3 album with a bassist wasn't unheard of, but it wasn't standard procedure either). Solos by both McGriff and Mitchell are choppy and punchy in the extreme. The trumpeter is amazing here, offering a small taste of the sound he displayed on 1969's Collision in Black. But check out the next two tunes, both McGriff originals that push the LP into the red zone and keep it there. "Keep Loose" takes the organist head-to-head against Schwartz's electric six-string, and forces a showdown. McGriff is like an out-of-control soul singer (James Brown in a concert setting comes to mind), incessantly forcing his band to play faster, greasier, and choppier on chorus after chorus. He ups the intensity level until there is nowhere to go but over the ledge. He takes them there on "Heavyweight," the very next number, a swinging boppish blues. The horns actually keep the track grounded as McGriff gets terse, dense, and finally unhinged: he's more adventurous in this solo than he had been before, then he double- and even triple-times the entire band! He brings Bushnell's bass up the ever-narrowing stairs of the riff until they become a single player, all groove, grit, and grease. McGriff's cover of Aretha Franklin's "Think" keeps the exuberance level high. As the horns move right into the Memphis soul vamp, McGriff again plays the part of a vocalist: charging up and down the melody on his keyboards, popping in slippery side chords and harmonic flourishes. Tate's drums swing freely yet forcefully, and bass and guitar lines are simply nasty. The readings of Kenny Burrell's "Lock It Up" and Billy Strayhorn's "Take the 'A' Train" are the closest things to "straight" jazz here, though they're full of razored edges and hard angles. The reading of Neal Hefti's "Girl Talk" features the horns strolling leisurely on the melody and vamp, but McGriff goes into overdrive again and his solo hits the stratosphere. The Worm is a monster album through and through. Not only is it a revelatory example of McGriff on the wild, it marks one of the first places where the new funky urban soul met jazz and blues and evolved into jazz-funk. ~ Thom Jurek

Maggiori informazioni

The Worm

Jimmy McGriff

launch qobuz app Ho già scaricato Qobuz per Windows/MacOS Apri

download qobuz app Non ho ancora scaricato Qobuz per Windows/MacOS Scarica l'app Qobuz
Ascolta sul Webplayer

Copia il seguente link per condividerlo

Al momento stai ascoltando degli estratti.

Ascolta oltre 50 milioni di brani con un abbonamento streaming illimitato.

Ascolta questo album e oltre 50 milioni di brani con i gli abbonamenti di streaming illimitato.

1
The Worm
00:03:20

Malcolm Addey, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Ron McMaster, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Sonny Lester, Producer - Jimmy McGriff, MainArtist - Fats Theus, Composer

Blue Note (R) is a registered trademark of Capitol Records, Inc. (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc. ℗ 1968 Blue Note Records

2
Keep Loose
00:05:56

Malcolm Addey, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Ron McMaster, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Sonny Lester, Producer - Jimmy McGriff, Composer, MainArtist

Blue Note (R) is a registered trademark of Capitol Records, Inc. (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc. ℗ 1968 Blue Note Records

3
Heavy Weight
00:06:52

Malcolm Addey, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Ron McMaster, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Sonny Lester, Producer - Jimmy McGriff, Composer, MainArtist

Blue Note (R) is a registered trademark of Capitol Records, Inc. (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc. ℗ 1968 Blue Note Records

4
Think
00:03:16

Aretha Franklin, Composer - Ted White, Composer - Malcolm Addey, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Ron McMaster, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Sonny Lester, Producer - Jimmy McGriff, MainArtist

Blue Note (R) is a registered trademark of Capitol Records, Inc. (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc. ℗ 1968 Blue Note Records

5
Lock It Up
00:05:13

Malcolm Addey, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Ron McMaster, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Sonny Lester, Producer - Kenny Burrell, Composer - Jimmy McGriff, MainArtist - W. Stephens, Composer

Blue Note (R) is a registered trademark of Capitol Records, Inc. (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc. ℗ 1968 Blue Note Records

6
Girl Talk
00:04:31

Malcolm Addey, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Neal Hefti, ComposerLyricist - Ron McMaster, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Sonny Lester, Producer - Bobby Troup, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy McGriff, MainArtist

Blue Note (R) is a registered trademark of Capitol Records, Inc. (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc. ℗ 1968 Blue Note Records

7
Blue Juice
00:04:59

Malcolm Addey, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Ron McMaster, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Sonny Lester, Producer - Jimmy McGriff, Composer, MainArtist

Blue Note (R) is a registered trademark of Capitol Records, Inc. (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc. ℗ 1969 Blue Note Records

8
Take The "A" Train
00:03:46

Malcolm Addey, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Billy Strayhorn, ComposerLyricist - Ron McMaster, Mastering Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Sonny Lester, Producer - Jimmy McGriff, MainArtist

Blue Note (R) is a registered trademark of Capitol Records, Inc. (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc. ℗ 1968 Blue Note Records

Descrizione dell'album

Jimmy McGriff's B-3 sound was always rooted in blues and gospel, and his soloing could be very smooth and polished. But every once in a while, he had to break out of his own soul box and tear it up on a session. The Worm, issued on Solid State Records in 1968, is the very first place he did. This is the first true, all-out funky burner from McGriff, and it sounds very different from most of the other titles on his shelf. Having a band like this helps: trumpeter Blue Mitchell, tenor saxophonist Fats Theus (with Bob Ashton on baritone and Danny Turner on alto), alternating drummers Mel Lewis and Grady Tate, bassist Bob Bushnell, and guitarist Thornel Schwartz were all in their prime in 1968. The title track, written by McGriff, Theus, and producer Sonny Lester, sets the tone for the whole platter. The saxophone section lays in the cut and is prodded on in a driving, funked-up, hard soul groove by the expanded rhythm section (a B-3 album with a bassist wasn't unheard of, but it wasn't standard procedure either). Solos by both McGriff and Mitchell are choppy and punchy in the extreme. The trumpeter is amazing here, offering a small taste of the sound he displayed on 1969's Collision in Black. But check out the next two tunes, both McGriff originals that push the LP into the red zone and keep it there. "Keep Loose" takes the organist head-to-head against Schwartz's electric six-string, and forces a showdown. McGriff is like an out-of-control soul singer (James Brown in a concert setting comes to mind), incessantly forcing his band to play faster, greasier, and choppier on chorus after chorus. He ups the intensity level until there is nowhere to go but over the ledge. He takes them there on "Heavyweight," the very next number, a swinging boppish blues. The horns actually keep the track grounded as McGriff gets terse, dense, and finally unhinged: he's more adventurous in this solo than he had been before, then he double- and even triple-times the entire band! He brings Bushnell's bass up the ever-narrowing stairs of the riff until they become a single player, all groove, grit, and grease. McGriff's cover of Aretha Franklin's "Think" keeps the exuberance level high. As the horns move right into the Memphis soul vamp, McGriff again plays the part of a vocalist: charging up and down the melody on his keyboards, popping in slippery side chords and harmonic flourishes. Tate's drums swing freely yet forcefully, and bass and guitar lines are simply nasty. The readings of Kenny Burrell's "Lock It Up" and Billy Strayhorn's "Take the 'A' Train" are the closest things to "straight" jazz here, though they're full of razored edges and hard angles. The reading of Neal Hefti's "Girl Talk" features the horns strolling leisurely on the melody and vamp, but McGriff goes into overdrive again and his solo hits the stratosphere. The Worm is a monster album through and through. Not only is it a revelatory example of McGriff on the wild, it marks one of the first places where the new funky urban soul met jazz and blues and evolved into jazz-funk. ~ Thom Jurek

A proposito dell'album

Migliora questa pagina

Qobuz logo Perché acquistare su Qobuz

ORA IN OFFERTA...
So Peter Gabriel
Peter Gabriel 1: Car Peter Gabriel
Us Peter Gabriel
Altro su Qobuz
Di Jimmy McGriff
Ti potrebbe piacere anche...
War In My Mind Beth Hart
Oklahoma Keb' Mo'
Blood Siren Sarah McCoy
Walking To New Orleans George Benson
Nelle Panoramiche...
Americana, alle radici dell’America

Il nome saprà anche di trovata commerciale un po’ fumosa, ma il genere Americana designa da una ventina d’anni quel mix di rock, country, blues e rhythm&blues. E come in ogni grande famiglia che si rispetti, si ritrovano un po’ tutti i personaggi: la figlia ribelle, lo zio colto, il padre irrequieto, la cugina esaltata…

British blues boom, cronaca di una rivoluzione

Se Joe Bonamassa ritornò con British Blues Explosion, un anno dopo Blue And Lonesome dei Rolling Stones, fu perché il boom del blues inglese si rivelò essere qualcosa di più di una semplice moda... Più che una semplice tendenza musicale, l'interesse di una giovane generazione per le grandi icone del blues americano, ignorate nella loro terra, generò un'autentica rivoluzione guidata da tre principali agitatori: Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck e Jimmy Page, considerati oltre la Manica, niente meno che la Santissima Trinità della storia del rock o della chitarra. Sebbene non fossero gli unici musicisti coinvolti, fu attraverso le loro rispettive carriere che si scoprì che il blues, lungi dall'essere una musica che aveva passato la sua data di scadenza, era come un salto verso altre dimensioni musicali che avrebbe permesso molteplici innovazioni.

J.J. Cale: l’eremita del blues

A più di cinque anni dalla sua scomparsa, non si può dimenticare quella fonte vitale di musica che è stato il lavoro di J.J. Cale. Con la sua fusione unica di blues, folk, country e jazz, quest'uomo venerato da Eric Clapton, che visse per un po' anche in un trailer-park, continua ad essere uno degli asceti più influenti del rock.

Nel magazine...