Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categorie:
Carrello 0

Il tuo carrello è vuoto

Ute Lemper - Rendezvous with Marlene

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Rendezvous with Marlene

Ute Lemper

Disponibile in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Streaming illimitato

Ascolta subito questo album in alta qualità sulle nostre app

Inizia il mio periodo di prova e riproduci l'album

Goditi questo album sulle app Qobuz con il tuo abbonamento

Resgistrati

Goditi questo album sulle app Qobuz con il tuo abbonamento

Download digitale

Seleziona la qualità audio

Per avere diritto a questo prezzo, abbonati a Sublime+

Lingua disponibile: inglese

In 1988, a 24-year-old Ute Lemper, then living in Paris, received a phone call from longtime Parisian and artist Marlene Dietrich. It was in response to a postcard sent by Lemper, who had won the French Moliere Prize for her star-making role as Sally Bowles in Cabaret. Lemper apologized for the press comparisons between them. Dietrich, 87, was by then a recluse, her only connection to the world a telephone line. That call lasted three hours. Dietrich regaled Lemper with stories from her life: of her work and lovers, her estranged daughter, Rilke's poetry, her hatred of Hitler, and her continuing grief and longing for the Weimar Republic. During the war Dietrich housed refugees, helped create a fund to assist escaping Jews and dissidents, performed near the front lines, and provided personal financial support. Moved by Dietrich's epic life, Lemper resolved to tell it from the star's point of view. She created Rendezvous with Marlene as a show with monologues and songs about what she knew from the call and research of Dietrich's career. This release reproduces the touring show's music, impeccably recorded in a studio with a string orchestra and Vana Gierig's jazz quartet. While Lemper thoroughly channels Dietrich's aesthetic spirit, she is always herself musically. She opens with a bluesy, sultry reading of Johnny Mercer's and Harold Arlen's "One More for My Baby," cut by Dietrich in 1954. Lemper offers her theatricality with her own provocative phrasing. The performance of "Naughty Lola" is one for the books given Lemper's commanding use of scat singing and vocalese. Dietrich recorded her own charting cover of Bob Dylan's "Blowing in the Wind" in German; Lemper delivers it bilingually with halting strings, muted percussion, and sparse piano. She also delivers wonderful versions of two iconic Friedrich Hollaender songs, "The Ruins of Berlin" and "Want to Buy Some Illusions" that Dietrich sang in the film A Foreign Affair in 1948. Pete Seeger's "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" is here because Dietrich cut it in thunderous applause; Lemper's bilingual performance is dignified and questioning. Her version of "Just a Gigolo" (Dietrich sang it with David Bowie in 1978 in her final film role) is filled with regret and acceptance. Hollaender's "Falling in Love Again" is Dietrich's most famous song. After singing it in Blau Engel in German, she recorded it in English in 1937 as a metaphor to renounce her German citizenship. Lemper's take is sublime: Bold and jazzy, she juxtaposes the erotic flush of new romance with a resolve to abandon the past. Also included are seminal French songs, including fine readings of Charles Trenet's "Que Reste-t-il de Nos Amour" and the classic "Dejeuner de Matin" by Joseph Kosma and Jacques Prévert, rendered with the pained beauty of classic chanson that both Lemper and Dietrich revered. Rendezvous with Marlene concludes with five beautifully rendered German songs reflecting Lemper's homage to Dietrich, as well as their kinship as expatriates and. This is one of Lemper's finest moments.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

Maggiori informazioni

Rendezvous with Marlene

Ute Lemper

launch qobuz app Ho già scaricato Qobuz per Windows/MacOS Apri

download qobuz app Non ho ancora scaricato Qobuz per Windows/MacOS Scarica l'app Qobuz

Copia il seguente link per condividerlo

Al momento stai ascoltando degli estratti.

Ascolta oltre 50 milioni di brani con un abbonamento streaming illimitato.

Ascolta questo album e oltre 50 milioni di brani con i gli abbonamenti di streaming illimitato.

1
One for My Baby
00:03:43

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

2
Lili Marleen
00:03:13

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

3
They Call Me Naughty Lola
00:03:12

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

4
Blowing in the Wind
00:04:34

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

5
Marie Marie
00:03:55

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

6
Ruins of Berlin
00:03:51

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

7
Und wenn er wiederkommt
00:03:41

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

8
When the World Was Young
00:04:56

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

9
Wenn ich mir was wünschen dürfte
00:03:36

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

10
Want to Buy Some Illusions
00:03:46

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

11
Que Reste-t-il De Nos Amour
00:06:42

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

12
The Laziest Gal in Town
00:02:45

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

13
Where Have All the Flowers Gone
00:04:33

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

14
Just a Gigolo
00:03:04

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

15
Falling in Love Again
00:03:02

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

16
Ich hab' noch einen Koffer in Berlin
00:02:06

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

17
Allein in einer großen Stadt
00:04:53

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

18
Dejeuner Du Matin
00:02:52

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

19
Wenn der Sommer wieder einzieht
00:03:07

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

20
Sch... Kleines Baby
00:02:44

Ute Lemper, MainArtist

(C) 2020 Jazzhaus Records (P) 2020 Jazzhaus Records

Descrizione dell'album

In 1988, a 24-year-old Ute Lemper, then living in Paris, received a phone call from longtime Parisian and artist Marlene Dietrich. It was in response to a postcard sent by Lemper, who had won the French Moliere Prize for her star-making role as Sally Bowles in Cabaret. Lemper apologized for the press comparisons between them. Dietrich, 87, was by then a recluse, her only connection to the world a telephone line. That call lasted three hours. Dietrich regaled Lemper with stories from her life: of her work and lovers, her estranged daughter, Rilke's poetry, her hatred of Hitler, and her continuing grief and longing for the Weimar Republic. During the war Dietrich housed refugees, helped create a fund to assist escaping Jews and dissidents, performed near the front lines, and provided personal financial support. Moved by Dietrich's epic life, Lemper resolved to tell it from the star's point of view. She created Rendezvous with Marlene as a show with monologues and songs about what she knew from the call and research of Dietrich's career. This release reproduces the touring show's music, impeccably recorded in a studio with a string orchestra and Vana Gierig's jazz quartet. While Lemper thoroughly channels Dietrich's aesthetic spirit, she is always herself musically. She opens with a bluesy, sultry reading of Johnny Mercer's and Harold Arlen's "One More for My Baby," cut by Dietrich in 1954. Lemper offers her theatricality with her own provocative phrasing. The performance of "Naughty Lola" is one for the books given Lemper's commanding use of scat singing and vocalese. Dietrich recorded her own charting cover of Bob Dylan's "Blowing in the Wind" in German; Lemper delivers it bilingually with halting strings, muted percussion, and sparse piano. She also delivers wonderful versions of two iconic Friedrich Hollaender songs, "The Ruins of Berlin" and "Want to Buy Some Illusions" that Dietrich sang in the film A Foreign Affair in 1948. Pete Seeger's "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" is here because Dietrich cut it in thunderous applause; Lemper's bilingual performance is dignified and questioning. Her version of "Just a Gigolo" (Dietrich sang it with David Bowie in 1978 in her final film role) is filled with regret and acceptance. Hollaender's "Falling in Love Again" is Dietrich's most famous song. After singing it in Blau Engel in German, she recorded it in English in 1937 as a metaphor to renounce her German citizenship. Lemper's take is sublime: Bold and jazzy, she juxtaposes the erotic flush of new romance with a resolve to abandon the past. Also included are seminal French songs, including fine readings of Charles Trenet's "Que Reste-t-il de Nos Amour" and the classic "Dejeuner de Matin" by Joseph Kosma and Jacques Prévert, rendered with the pained beauty of classic chanson that both Lemper and Dietrich revered. Rendezvous with Marlene concludes with five beautifully rendered German songs reflecting Lemper's homage to Dietrich, as well as their kinship as expatriates and. This is one of Lemper's finest moments.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

A proposito dell'album

Migliora questa pagina

Qobuz logo Perché acquistare su Qobuz

ORA IN OFFERTA...
Altro su Qobuz
Di Ute Lemper
Ti potrebbe piacere anche...
Nelle Panoramiche...
Jordi Savall - La musica, la vita, le incisioni

Pioveva a dirotto quella sera di ottobre nel Bugey, dove d’altronde piove spesso in quel periodo dell’anno. Era intorno a mezzanotte. Io e una cinquantina di altri fan ce ne stavamo lì ad aspettare in silenzio, al freddo e all’umido del Festival d’Ambronay. Poi, senza il minimo rumore, spuntò Jordi Savall, avvolto in un impermeabile bianco completamente fradicio, stile Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca. Stringeva a sé una cassa a forma di corpo umano, da cui estrasse, con gesti lenti, non una mitragliatrice, bensì una viola da gamba che prese a maneggiare e ad accordare con estrema cura. Ed ecco prodursi il miracolo.

Nel magazine...