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Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

513480 albums sorted by Bestsellers and filtered by Pop/Rock
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Rock - Released October 23, 2020 | Columbia

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The arc of creative genius is predictable. In popular music, the simple answer is no one writes great songs forever. Success tends to dull raging emotions and satiate once endless hunger. In popular music few outside the Beatles can claim a run of success like that of Bruce Springsteen. From 1973's Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J. to 1987's Tunnel of Love, The Boss wrote album after album's worth of truly great songs. His muse returned on 1995's acoustic The Ghost of Tom Joad and 2002's 9/11 influenced triumph The Rising but has been sporadic ever since. Always a searcher, Springsteen has now been re-energized as a songwriter by the twin calamities of loss and mortality. Letter To You, his 20th album, bears the impact not only of Clarence Clemons' passing but also the recent revelation that he is now the last man alive from his first band, The Castiles. The man who once launched himself off PA towers with wild abandon, proclaiming his stone desire, has become a 71-year-old who's finally played the ace card he's had all along: a return to the studio with the E Street Band. Recorded live with the band at his Stone Hill Studio near his New Jersey home, Letter To You—unlike marathon Springsteen sessions from the past—was tracked in a mere five days. The sound is not the crisp digital world of his solo projects but the full-bodied band sound chock-full of guitar chords, organs, glockenspiels, harmonicas, Roy Bittan's piano and the welcome pounding of the mighty Max Weinberg. Clarence's nephew Jake Clemons provides ghostly echoes of his uncle's horn. After opening with the acoustic solo number "One Minute You're Here" with the singer laying his penny down on the tracks, the E Street vibe floods in on the title track. The acoustic piano-led "House of a Thousand Guitars," speaks for "good souls near and far," while "Rainmaker" hints at politics where "folks need to believe in something so bad." Three old songs written in the '70s anchor the album. "Janey Needs a Shooter," written for Darkness on the Edge of Town and later loosely covered by Warren Zevon, has long been one of the strongest Bruce outtakes. He reaches back further, all the way to Greetings, for "If I Was the Priest," and "Song for Orphans." Both are solid and Dylanesque, filled with the dense often jabberwocky wordplay of his long-ago debut. Once exhilarating signs that a great talent was rising, these songs now indicate that after exploring many artistic sideroads, that same virtuoso has taken a step forward by returning to his roots. © Robert Baird/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 13, 2020 | Columbia

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An AC/DC album always sounds like an AC/DC album! Even if the Australian-British bandmembers are now between 65 and 73 years old, they have no reason to change their formula as its their usual prescription that everybody wants: short, sharp riffs, heavy rock infused with blues, metronomic rhythms, stadium anthems and minimalist, haiku-like lyrics. It could be said that there's a bit of a lyrical revolution going on throughout Power Up: for the first time since Fly on the Wall (1985), none of the twelve tracks contain the word ‘rock’! Is this a sign? Not really… Recorded like its three predecessors in Bryan Adams’ Warehouse Studio in Vancouver, Power Up is AC/DC's first opus since the death of rhythm guitarist Malcom Young in late 2017 (Young had been battling dementia for several months). Already in 2014 for Rock or Bust illness had kept him away from the recording studio with his nephew Stevie filling in for him. It was only right that his younger brother, the brilliant Angus Young, put this 17th album together as a kind of testament to his older brother. "I know Mal's not with us anymore, but he's there with us in spirit. This band was his baby, his life. He was always one [to say], 'you keep going'. He always said, 'If you're a musician, it's a bit like being on the Titanic. The band goes down with the ship.'"Over the course of their 45-year career, the two brothers had always kept skeletons of song ideas and hoards of guitar riffs. These musical treasure troves were instrumental in the conception of Power Up which features riffs written by the late Malcom Young. Having already been at the helm of production for Black Ice (2008) and Rock or Bust (2014), American producer Brendan O’Brien mixed the perfect sound to match the timelessness of the songs. Rarely have we heard such purity and simplicity from AC/DC since Back in Black (1980), with an added efficiency similar to that of the Bon Scott era, as on the single Shot in the Dark. Little to no fat here! Even Brian Johnson holds his mic with more steadiness. Occasionally, the blues spirit of the grandiose Powerage (1978) floats in the air, as does the fraternal and juvenile energy of Highway to Hell (1979). It's true that some tracks are only loosely held together by guitar riffs, ignoring fundamental harmony and melody. However, on the excellent Through the Mists of Time AC/DC really do some exploring, and Demon Fire makes it difficult to stay in your seat! Even if Power Up isn't particularly surprising in what it has to offer, you still have the invigorating feeling of having taken a big slap of Rock’n’Roll electricity straight to the face. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 13, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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While the end of the 80s signalled the end for a lot of great bands who had been around for the last ten or fifteen years, it meant rebirth for Pink Floyd. The group had already lived two lives – one with and one without Syd Barrett. When Roger Waters left in 1985 he tried as hard as he could to stop the band from using the same name for future projects. After a long legal battle, Gilmour, Mason and Wright won the right to carry on using Pink Floyd. A Momentary Lapse of Reason came out in 1987, the first post-Waters album. A phenomenal tour followed which gave us the live album Delicate Sound of Thunder the following year. The album was different from the group’s other records for a number of reasons. Firstly, it was Pink Floyds first real live album (yes, there was Ummagumma but that was made up of two discs - one studio, one live). Secondly, it was a hugely successful tour, largely thanks to their use of both audio and visuals – images had long played a crucial role in their music (the film Live at Pompeii released 16 years earlier is a good example of this). And finally, it was the first album to ever be played in space thanks to the Soviet astronauts who took it aboard the Soyuz TM-7 shuttle when travelling to the Mir space station. This completed remixed re-release takes the acclaimed live album into a new era. Having stood out before for its (almost too) perfect sound recording and mixing, Delicate Sound of Thunder can now be enjoyed in a remixed hi-fi version that makes you feel like you’re right there in the mobile studio doing the live recording. It’s a unique experience for the senses, even if it does slightly do away with their psychedelic touch. Pink Floyd now belonged to Gilmour and he chose to focus a large part of the concert on A Momentary Lapse of Reason before going for an all-too-short segue into their best hits, mostly coming from Dark Side of the Moon. Despite this decision (which might be a bit annoying for die-hard fans) there are enough classics from albums like Shine On You Crazy Diamond, One of These Days and Wish You Were Here to keep you satisfied. In 1988, media formats forced the band to remove some songs from their tracklist due to a lack of space. This remixed version restores the forgotten tracks to reveal a complete concert with the addition of 7 songs and guitar solos that were shortened in the first version. This gives added flavour to a performance that went down in history alongside their other live album Pulse which was released in 1995 and was met with resounding success. This record just goes to show that Pink Floyd’s concerts really were immersive experiences. © Chief Brody/Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 19, 2020 | Columbia

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Immediately contradicting the album's title, opener "I Contain Multitudes" finds Dylan doing his best Leonard Cohen: the lion in winter, growling with deceptively gentle gravitas over cinematic guitar—paying tribute to William Blake, Anne Frank, Indiana Jones and "them British bad boys the Rolling Stones." If it were to be the 79-year-old's last stand, it's a pretty damn great one. But he immediately springs to spirited life with "False Prophet," a no-frills dirty blues march. There are so many highlights: "My Own Version of You" is a laugh-out-loud "Frankenstein" tale set to a shadowy guitar prowl; the swooning "I've Made Up My Mind to Give Myself to You" borrows from doo-wop balladry. "I hope the gods go easy with me," Dylan croons on that track, and it's hard to shake the feeling that he's taking stock. But there's still so much to say. "Key West (Philosopher's Pilot)" finds the elder statesman chasing immortality along Route 1 for nine-and-a-half fully entertaining minutes, while closer "Murder Most Foul" stretches out for nearly 17, reliving the Kennedy assassination and incanting a phone book's worth of cultural-imprint references without wasting a second. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Pop - Released May 17, 2013 | Columbia

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 étoiles Rock and Folk - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music - Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released April 10, 1977 | A&M

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The title of Even in the Quietest Moments... isn't much of an exaggeration -- this 1977 album finds Supertramp indulging in some of their quietest moments, spending almost the album in a subdued mood. Actually, the cover photo picture of a snow-covered piano sitting on a mountain gives a good indication of what the album sounds like: it's elegant yet mildly absurd, witty but kind of obscure. It also feels more pop than it actually is, despite the opening single, "Give a Little Bit," their poppiest song to date, as well as their biggest hit. If the rest of the album doesn't boast another song as tight or concise as this -- "Downstream" comes close but it doesn't have the same hook, while "Babaji," a pseudo-spiritual moment that falls from the pop mark; the other four tracks clock in well over six minutes, with the closer, "Fool's Overture," reaching nearly 11 minutes -- it nevertheless places a greater emphasis on melody and gentle textures than any previous Supertramp release. So, it's a transitional album, bridging the gap between Crime of the Century and the forthcoming Breakfast in America, and even if it's not as full formed as either, it nevertheless has plenty of fine moments aside from "Give a Little Bit," including the music hall shuffle of "Loverboy," the Euro-artiness of "From Now On," and the "Fool on a Hill" allusions on "Fool's Overture." © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal Music Group International

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 24, 2020 | Taylor Swift

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It’s important to remember that before becoming a gold-standard pop star, Taylor Swift grew up on Nashville country music. Music City's folklore now seems a long way off for the thirty-year-old singer. However, Taylor Swift has never stopped dipping her pen into the same ink as her cowgirl elders, perfectly handling romance, heartbreak, introspection, sociopolitical commentary and personal experiences, such as when she sang of her mother’s cancer on Soon You’ll Get Better… It was in lockdown, with restricted means and limited casting, that she put together Folklore, released in the heart of summer 2020. The first surprise here is Aaron Dessner on production. By choosing The National’s guitarist, whom she considers one of her idols, Swift has opted for a musician with sure-footed tastes and boosted her credibility among indie music fans. She hammers this home on Exile with Justin ‘Bon Iver’ Vernon (the album’s only duet), a close friend of Dessner's with whom he formed Big Red Machine.This surprising, even unusual album for Swift is by no means a calculated attempt to flirt with the hipsters. And it really is unusual for her! No pop bangers, nor the usual dig aimed at Kanye West; the album is free of supercharged beats and has delicate instrumentation (piano, acoustic guitar, Mellotron, mandolin, slides…). Folklore toes a perfect line between silky neo-folk and dreamy rock. It’s as if the star had tucked herself away in a cabin in the forest to dream up new ideas, much like Bon Iver did in his early days… By laying her music bare and relieving it of its usual chart music elements, Taylor Swift has added more substance to her discography. This is clear on August, which would never have resonated as well if it had been produced by a Max Martin type… Upon announcing the album, Swift wrote online: “Before this year I probably would’ve overthought when to release this music at the ‘perfect’ time, but the times we’re living in keep reminding me that nothing is guaranteed. My gut is telling me that if you make something you love, you should just put it out into the world.” A wise decision for a beautiful and mature record. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 11, 2020 | Taylor Swift

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After being the Princess of Nashville and then the World Queen of Pop, might Taylor Swift now be the goddess of indie folk? In the summer of 2020, she released the surprising Folklore. An album produced by Aaron Dessner of the National, on which she performs with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. With no pop bangers, no body-built beats, it's the perfect folk counterpoint, carried by understated instrumentation mixing piano, acoustic guitar, mellotron, mandolin and slide guitar. Barely five months later, Evermore has all the hallmarks of the sequel to Folklore: it might even be its twin. Especially since Bon Iver and the National are still there. The Haim sisters and Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons have joined the ranks of these classy guests. Taylor Swift keeps her folk-pop troubadour costume on, and here becomes more introspective than ever. Her songs offer a precise fusion of real facts and improbable daydreams. Obviously, Folklore's element of surprise is no longer on the agenda. But that doesn't keep the star from coming out with strong lyrics about fame (Gold Rush and Dorothea), separation (Happiness) or the twilight of love (Tolerate It). She says she spent 2020 writing, writing, writing, and her pen clearly got a workout. Not all of her songs are of the same calibre, and Folklore remains superior overall. But taken as a whole, all of these 2020 recordings have tipped her over into another world. The fascinating little craft business that Taylor Swift is running here has shaken up the pop canon to make a sound that's even more personal and universal than ever. It remains to be seen what the world (of Taylor Swift) will look like after... © Marc Zisman / Qobuz
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Pop - Released June 12, 2020 | Blue Note Records

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A misconception has sometimes been associate with Norah Jones: that the Texan is little more than a pleasant light-jazz singer whose albums serve as harmless background music for high-brow and proper evening dinners. Though her writing, playing and eclectic collaborations, she has clearly proved that she is far more interesting than this cliché. And this 2020 offering is a new illustration of her complexity. As is often the case with Norah Jones, Pick Me Up Off the Floor is not quite jazz, not quite blues, not quite country, etc… Her genre-defying music works primarily to suit the song being played. Here we find what has been left behind after sessions with Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, Thomas Bartlett, Mavis Staples, Rodrigo Amarante and several others.But for all that the result is not simply a contrived mishmash of collaborations but a collection of songs that hold the same silky groove (present on six out of 11 tracks on the record in which Brian Blade’s drums work delicate miracles) and calm sound which increasingly suits the artist, somewhere between pure poetry and realism. “Every session I’ve done, there’ve been extra songs I didn’t release, and they’ve sort of been collecting for the last two years. I became really enamoured with them, having the rough mixes on my phone, listening while I walk the dog. The songs stayed stuck in my head and I realised that they had this surreal thread running through them. It feels like a fever dream taking place somewhere between God, the Devil, the heart, the Country, the planet, and me.” Rarely has Norah Jones sang with such strength, like on I’m Alive where she sings of women’s resilience, or on How I Weep in which she tackles love and exasperation with unequalled grace. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released March 19, 2021 | Polydor Records

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Like everybody else, Lana Del Rey is playing hide-and-seek with quarantine. For her seventh album, the New Yorker based in Los Angeles has opted for hushed intimacy, bedroom melodies and confessional arrangements. With Chemtrails Over the Country Club, her pop is folkier than ever, although the echo and reverb in which her exquisite, sensual and hypnotic voice basks set her high above the clouds. This folk idiom fascinates her to the point that she closes out this record (with some help from Natalie Mering aka Weyes Blood and Zella Day) with a magnificent cover of Joni Mitchell's For Free, taken from her album Ladies of the Canyon (1970). There are also those guitars with an air of the Laurel Canyon 70's scene about them on Not All Who Wander Are Lost, and the equally pure guitar sounds that open Yosemite. As usual, Lana Del Rey takes out her pen to decry the torments of celebrity and the star system, starting with White Dress which opens the album, regretting the good old days when she was a barmaid, unknown and listening to Sun Ra, Kings Of Leon and the White Stripes "when they were white hot". Further on, she offers up more references to the music history as on Breaking Up Slowly (a duet with Nikki Lane) where she addresses the marital storms between those two legends of country music, Tammy Wynette and George Jones. On song after song, this solitary amazon soldiers on, not battling for any particular cause, just doing what is right by her own lights ("Well, I don't care what they think. Drag racing my little red sports car. I'm not unhinged or unhappy, I'm just wild"). Chemtrails Over the Country Club shows above all that she excels in the art of storytelling, wielding her tweezers to fine-tune every detail of her lyrics. At 35, Lana Del Rey has arguably released her freest and most accomplished album. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2020 | Bad Seed Ltd

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The time of Nick Cave the rock’n’roll radical is long gone. Once an erratic punk showman possessed by the ghosts of old greats like Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Howlin’ Wolf and others… Time has very much smoothed down those edges, the Australian now dips his quill in a very different ink following the death of his son at the age of 15. With Skeleton Tree (2016) and Ghosteen (2019), the Bad Seeds frontman’s art transformed into a mystical outlet. Creation in grief, for grief. It is often through grief that stories of humanity are told and these albums provide a crushing reminder of this fact. Released in Autumn 2020, Idiot Prayer is solemn in form but not substance. Voluntarily yes, but mostly due to the 2020 pandemic. Nick Cave is thus alone here, without his Bad Seeds or anyone else for that matter. Just him and a piano in Alexandra Palace, London. The performance was transmitted live online on the 23rd of July 2020. For this unique performance, the setlist goes beyond his last two albums (from which he plays only three songs) and sees Cave trawl through old Bad Seeds records (Stranger Than Kindness, The Ship Song, Black Hair, (Are You) the One That I’ve Been Waiting For, The Mercy Seat…) and his other group, Grinderman (Man in the Moon, Palaces of Montezuma…). Only one new composition is included, Euthanasia, a melancholic hymn and study of loss…His magnificent voice resonates within this grandiose 19th century Victorian palace enveloping the author in words of flesh and blood, surrealist and candid poetry. Nick Cave resembles here Robert Mitchum’s character in The Night of the Hunter who tattoos the words LOVE and HATE onto each of his hands and makes them fight each other. Through mixing love songs, murder ballads and tortured hymns, the Australian crooner offers a most beautiful treasure trove, a guided tour of his oeuvre. And such limited instrumentals bring out the best in his voice (he has rarely sung so well) strengthening his old songs tenfold. Marvellous. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Released September 11, 2020 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Suzanne Vega’s musical world involves stories in which characters hold as much importance as the setting they find themselves in. In this moving and delicate live recording, the singer pays homage to New York, one of her favourite cities. Surrounded by her longtime guitarist Gerry Leonard, bassist Jeff Allen and keyboardist Jamie Edwards, Suzanne Vega replays a section of her repertoire on the famous Café Carlyle stage in New York. “It’s a little club which has welcomed legends from Eartha Kitt to Judy Collins, and is also known for being the place where Jackie Kennedy met Audrey Hepburn.”, explains the singer. The hits Luka and Tom’s Diner have naturally been given a well-deserved place in this rich playlist which looks back on a career spanning 35 years that blossomed in the 1980s and continued throughout the 90s. Vega often gives a nod towards 70s folk music in her fragile and sweetly melancholic songs. The concert’s particularly intimate orchestration reinforces this spirit to the point that the same magic is there from the first piano chords and guitar riffs. The recording reaches its climax in a rendition of Walk on the Wild Side by Lou Reed, one of her idols. Through her tales of the hubbub of the great American city, Suzanne Vega manages to tell a story of her own. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Rock - Released February 4, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released December 18, 2020 | Capitol Records

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At crucial moments in his epic career, Paul McCartney has turned to a self-titled solo record as an emotional palette cleanser. In 1970 as the Beatles were in the throes of dissolution, he made the shambolic, rough-hewed McCartney (on the back cover was a shot of his infant daughter Mary nestled in his coat—her photography is now part of the McCartney III packaging). Ten years later as Wings was crashing back to earth, he made the synth-driven McCartney II. Both were initially savaged by press and fans alike but have since become much-beloved entries in his ever-lengthening discography, now seen as more personal and experimental efforts in a solo career that has often been commercially focused to a fault. While the scenario of a 78-year-old Paul McCartney locked up by the pandemic in his Sussex home with a computer, a plethora of musical instruments and a desire to do the one-man band thing screams incoming indulgence, McCartney III is certainly that, but in a good way. The stylistic freedom inherent in being isolated and alone is a welcome antidote to his legendary sense of what sells. Macca's best album since 2007's Memory Almost Full, the variety of McCartney III is its strongest point. For those still looking for wisps of Beatlesque genius, "Lavatory Lil"—whose title recalls "Polythene Pam"—is exuberance that very nearly tips from sass into offensive ire. And if it's the White Album you're missing, "The Kiss of Venus," sung in his fading yet still capable falsetto, recalls his former band's devotion to baroque pop as it makes its spidery way, eventually adding harpsichord accents. For the sound of Sir Paul cutting loose and rocking out with abandon, the ponderous proto-metal sendup of "Slidin'" is the sound of the shrieker of "Helter Skelter" again getting his ya-yas out with, "I know there must be other ways of feeling free, but this what I want to do, who I want to be." As for intimacy, the unprocessed sound of McCartney's now weathered voice, sounds wise and ruminative in "Pretty Boys," singing lines about "bicycles for hire" and "working for the squire." The crisp, mostly uncompressed sonics here prove that Sir Paul's ears have lost none of their acuity as the slow, careful home recording process challenged him to limit excessive layering and to capture his voice, warts and all, in a natural way. On the looped beat and repetitive lyrics of the oddly attractive R&Bish groove of "Deep Down," he even goes hoarse and talky. Finally, the album's sleek and rolling centerpiece, "Deep Deep Feeling," which wrestles with the sweet and sour aspects of love, is built on acoustic piano and an impressive fusion of lead and background vocals. While the album's opener "Long Tailed Winter Bird" and closer "Winter Bird / When Winter Comes" could be taken as signs that McCartney intends to flutter off the scene, the vital energies audible in McCartney III say otherwise. © Robert Baird/Qobuz
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Rock - Released August 30, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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They’ve been the talk of the town for nearly 2 years. Early 2018, Maynard James Keenan nearly sabotaged the promotional cycle for Eat the Elephant, the 4th album of his “other main band”, A Perfect Circle, by announcing to much surprise that 10,000 Days’ successor was nearly done and that it would see the light of day at the latest in Fall 2018. Considering that 10,000 Days, the band’s 4th album, hails back to 2006 – another era entirely – even those without a shred of cynicism in their bodies joked that we’d be lucky to see the next Tool album in 2029. And yet, here we are. As a preview to the album of the same name, the epic, meandering Fear Inoculum is out. Once you get past the zen intro, complete with ting-sha cymbals, soft harmonies and a tabla, which could have set the scene for a massage parlor, Keenan’s voice comes as a remind that this relaxing atmosphere will soon subside, in favor of something much more menacing. The song could be construed as a retrospective piece, that touches upon all the different styles covered by the band since its inception in 1990. A great entrée for what looks like a very large menu. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Pop - Released August 28, 2020 | Polydor

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Yello is above all the story of a hit: Oh Yeah. Released in 1985, Oh Yeah did extremely well thanks to its feature in a series of teen movies, from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off to American Pie, and, of course, thanks to the Simpsons character, Duffman. The has always kept Dieter Meier and Boris Blank fresh in public memory and the Swiss duo shows no sign of fading as they release their sixteenth album dedicated to the sounds of the late 80s, but with a slightly modern twist. This is more or less the sole concept for this album which, as explained by the group, goes in multiple directions: “It’s part spy film, part Dali-painting, part strobe lit dance floor, part 4D car chase and part deep space torch song.” The twelve tracks sound very much like machines from the 1980s, from Way Down, a nod towards Funkadelic, to the flashy, pithy house explosion of Arthur Spark. Forty years later, Yello seem to still be with it.
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Rock - Released June 19, 2020 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Neil Young's "lost album," Homegrown, gets its debut 41 years late. Young shelved it because he "just couldn't listen to" the heartache, which followed the collapse of his romance with actress Carrie Snodgress. Meant to fall between Harvest and Comes a Time, the 1974 time capsule fits neatly in that space. "Separate Ways" and "Try," both featuring drums by Levon Helm, truly feel like an extension of Harvest: the former a noir-country lament and the latter an ambling plea for love lifted aloft by Emmylou Harris' backing vocals. Throughout, train-whistle harmonica is a Greek chorus, popping up on the gorgeous and hopeless "Star of Bethlehem" ("All your dreams and your lovers won't protect you") and stripped-bare "Love Is a Rose"—which would be made famous in '75 by Linda Ronstadt and here ends with urgent guitar chords like exclamation points of warning. There are moments of indulgence—you're safe to skip any title that's the name of a place—but also songs that stand with his best. The blistering "Vacancy" ("You poison me with that long, vacant stare") and high-lonesome "White Line," with Robbie Roberston, aren't to be missed. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Pop - Released October 16, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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At 36 years old, the queen of the romantic, sophisticated ballad has released her 8th album, simply named Album no.8. While the title is minimal, the means in which the work was produced are far from it. Here, Katie Melua is joined by the Georgian Philharmonic Orchestra. The collaboration is rather apt considering the British singer’s Georgian origins. The strings serve as a luxurious backdrop to these often-autobiographical songs which cover subjects from the end of a loving relationship (A Love Like That, Airtime), to a journey she took with her father in the Caucasus mountains (Leaving the Mountain). The orchestra is present on each of the tracks but by no means does it squander the delicacy of the songs. Especially when some soloists (sax, piano, guitar…) or even a funky and jazzy rhythmic section occasionally drop in to lighten up the proceedings (Voices in the night). Producer Leo Abrahams did the arrangements on the album which sometimes evoke the finesse of Nick Drake or the contemplative emotion of John Barry. We also find an homage to the choreographer Pina Buasch, cowritten with Zurab, Katie’s brother (Maybe I Dreamt It), a tender evocation of the singer’s childhood (Heading Home), and also the very seductive English Manner, the portrait of a love triangle, unveiling a more colourful aspect to Katie Melua’s art. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 29, 2019 | Darkroom - Interscope Records

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“We are not serious when we are 17.” But Billie Eilish has all the marks of a serious young lady and someone who we should indeed take seriously. At the age of sixteen she released the noteworthy Don’t Smile at Me, an EP created with the help of her older brother, Finneas O’Connell. The EP is comprised of the singles Copycat, Bellyache and Ocean Eyes and was posted two years earlier on Soundcloud when Eilish was just 14 years old. Critics hailed her music due to its depiction of a lost adolescent with bleached hair, dressed in oversized sweaters. With the album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? and its strange title and shocking cover, Eilish and her dark hair flaunt their more obscure side. One is immediately struck with how well polished Finneas O’Connell’s production is after an intro in which Eilish jokingly mocks her brother for his Invisalign (a kind of invisible dental brace). The first track Bad Guy features an EDM beat which contrasts with the dreaminess of the subsequent Xanny. The rest of the album follows this trend, weaving together both harsh and soft songs combined with the mature lyrics of a girl who was diagnosed with Tourette’s at the age of 11 and speaks of Xanax and young girls descent into a hellish existence. In this mix of gloomy pop and creepy trap beats, Eilish excels. A real eye-opener. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz