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Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

195152 albums sorted by Price: from most expensive to least expensive and filtered by Pop/Rock
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Rock - Released June 7, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released August 22, 2012 | WM Japan

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Pop - Released March 25, 2014 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released December 17, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released July 1, 2014 | Rhino

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Rock - Released November 25, 2020 | Reprise

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For Neil Young, the early to mid-'70s was a time marked by his first taste of an initial revulsion to superstardom. In the wake of the success of Harvest, Young went on an often unhappy journey of self-discovery and reappraisal brought on by the end of his relationship with actress Carrie Snodgress and the overdose deaths of Crazy Horse guitarist Danny Whitten and roadie Bruce Berry. All of this was refracted through the moody lens of a trio of studio records known as the "Ditch Trilogy": On the Beach, Tonight's the Night and Zuma. This epochal period in Young's story has now been sweepingly documented by Neil Young Archives Vol. II (1972-1976), a 10-part box set, arranged chronologically, whose first run sold out on Young's website in November 2020. Best of all, its 139 tracks, 49 of which were unreleased and 12 previously unheard new songs, are all presented here in the brilliant high-resolution sound that's a hallmark of the Neil Young Archives. While ten albums may sound like too much Young even for collectors and longtime fans, Archives Vol. II includes three previously released albums: Homegrown from 1974-75 (released in 2020), and the live albums, Tuscaloosa (2019)—a much cheerier document from the same '73 Harvest tour that produced the troubled live album, Time Fades Away—and Roxy: Tonight's The Night Live (2018) recorded the same year on the Sunset Strip with the Crazy Horse rhythm section joined by guitarist/pianist Nils Lofgren and pedal steel guitarist Ben Keith in a band Young called the Santa Monica Flyers. The new songs, many of which were previously known to collectors, include a piano and dobro-led meditation on spirituality set to a steady push-pull 7/8 rhythm entitled "Goodbye Christians on the Shore." "Sweet Joni" is a rough-hewn tribute to Young's fellow Canadian who makes a guest appearance later in this set in her song, "Raised on Robbery." Deeper in there's another quartet of new songs headlined by "Frozen Man," where the singer wonders "who could live inside this frozen man" while a tale unspools that parallels Young's emotional struggles and wanderings during this very fraught decade. As for revelations among the live recordings on Archives Vol. II, there's Odeon Budokan, a mashup of unreleased live material from a pair of 1976 shows from Budokan Hall in Tokyo and London's Hammersmith Odeon. By then, Young had recovered his confidence and emotional equilibrium and is rocking out with Crazy Horse on a familiar set that finishes with an epic version of "Cortez the Killer." Most of the collection's greatest pleasures lie in unreleased versions of previously released tunes. One of the albums here, The Old Homestead opens and closes with unreleased versions of "Love/Art Blues," a tune first officially heard on the live CSNY 1974 album and whose lyrics perfectly encapsulate the dilemma Young found himself in during the period covered by Archives Vol. II 1972-1976: "I've got the love art blues/ Don't know which one to choose/ There's really something to lose/ With these love art blues." © Robert Baird/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 9, 2014 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Pop - Released April 30, 2013 | Rhino - Elektra

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Pop - Released May 7, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released May 13, 2016 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Punk / New Wave - Released September 27, 2019 | Rhino - Warner Records

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A rock’n’roll tsunami! On stage, the Ramones never questioned themselves, shooting at everything that moved just to remind everyone of their unique style; one that was anchored in traditional rock’n’roll yet incorporated surf music and punk. With foolishness as their philosophy, teenage carelessness as their credo, supersonic guitars as their weapon of mass destruction, this profession of faith - binary in form and playful in content - gave birth to amphetamine-fuelled hymns of bubble-gum pop such as Blitzkrieg Bop, Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue and Judy Is A Punk. Recorded in 1977 at London’s Rainbow Theatre on New Year’s Eve, It’s Alive includes these hits and many others, going at 200 mph through their first three albums: Ramones (1976), Leave Home (1977) and Rocket to Russia (1977). The gang from Forest Hills in Queens pack in 28 tracks in less than an hour! To celebrate the fortieth anniversary of this live anthology from 1979, the Deluxe Edition proposes the original remastered album alongside a series of tracks recorded at other concerts during the same English tour in December 1977: the Top Rank in Birmingham on 28 th , Victoria Hall in Stoke-On-Trent on 29 th and the Friars in Aylesbury on 30 th . Without the frills of the studio versions (not that there were many in the first place), all the songs on It's Alive tap into that initial fury, which comes across as even more raw and effective. This 40 th Anniversary Deluxe Edition is supervised by Ed Stasium, the producer and sound engineer of the original album. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released October 30, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released August 9, 2019 | RCA - Legacy

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Christmas day is every day for Elvis fans! As if the royal archives were a well that never dries up. If you thought they’d about run out of unpublished material, Legacy Recordings are out with new rarities like a magician playing some sort of bunny-in-the-hat trick. On the menu of Summer 2019, this wild Live 1969, a giant box set (216 tracks!) celebrating the 50 years of Elvis’ concerts at the Las Vegas International Hotel. After eight years in the shadows, the King was back on stage for 57 sold out concerts! During one of these shows, he was backed by the Imperials and the Sweet Inspirations for backing vocals, and musician-wise, a large orchestra as well as a group which would become the TCB Band later on. This is when he would sing the mythical Suspicious Minds for the first time live. Live 1969 includes 11 complete sets, of which four are complete for the first time, and two are never-before published, those from August 22nd and 25th). You’d have to be afflicted with serious Elvisitis to listen through the 13 hours and 15 minutes of these performances. But this series of concerts is mythical, since it surfs off of From Elvis in Memphis, the album which had been published two months earlier in June 1969. In January of the same year, the King, losing steam, had joined the American Sound Studios with producer Chips Moman to put his resurrection on tape, with this total country-soul masterpiece. It would prove one of the high points of his studio career, on which his voice reaches previously unheard heights. All of his technique is there! His vocal range is impressive and the instrumentation as well as the production are breathtaking. It’s an essential 15th album which was concluded by the heart-wrenching In The Ghetto. This Live 1969 boxset proves that the King’s royal comeback was also royal on stage. Even in his later hits from the end of the 50s, Presley, who was then 34 years old, delivers stellar performances. During the summer of 1969, the planet might have been twisting and shouting the sound of amplified rock & roll like never heard before (the Woodstock festival took place during that same month), but Elvis fancied playing the classy, classical crooner. Timeless, above the rabble. Way high up above. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released November 8, 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released July 19, 2019 | Rhino - Warner Records

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After leaving Apple Records in 1969, James Taylor signed a deal with Warner Bros. During those six years of partnership, his meteoritic rise made him one of the most adulated folk singers in the United States, for hits such as Fire and Rain and You’ve Got a Friend, that encapsulated his lyrical prowess, entrancing voice and overall capacity to rethink folk idioms in a more commercial-friendly format. Starting with Sweet Baby James in 1970, Mud Slide Slim and the Blue Horizon (1971) One Man Dog (1972), Walking Man (1974), Gorilla (1975), and last but not least In the Pocket, from 1976, the major steppingstones in Taylor’s career are here. These 6 albums, entirely remastered by Peter Asher, are featured on The Warner Bros. Albums: 1970-1976. The collection is a wonderful way to rediscover his halcyon days and his most important body of work, which would influence countless musicians during the 70s and after thanks to his sensitive, introspective charm. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz  
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Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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After Five Years (1969 – 1973) and Who Can I Be Now ? (1974 – 1976), to dive into the box set A New Career In A New Town (1977 – 1982), is to zoom in on David Bowie's Berlin period. In 1977, Ziggy moored up in the German city, then disfigured by a wall. With Diamond Dogs in 1974 and in particular Young Americans the following year, soul and funk were suffused with a rock’n’roll sound. But this Bowie was to be eclipsed by a colder, more cerebral, experimental Bowie. Always ready to re-invent himself, to follow trends (when he wasn't setting them himself...) and simply to question things, he flew to Berlin, where things were in motion. Alongside Brian Eno, formerly of Roxy Music, he wrote his famous Berlin trilogy, which opened with Low. On this bizarre record, everything begins with a weird baroque soul instrumental, with electronic textures (Speed of Light), then a balanced mix of songs and other instrumental tracks. Capable of delivering futurist soul (Sound And Vision), a sombre and mysterious symphony (Warszawa), new-wave minimalism that sounded like a Sci-Fi soundtrack (Art Decade) or disjointed, cubist rock (Breaking Glass), this was David Bowie revisiting his experiences with Krautrock from groups like Neu!, Can and Faust, playing with Kraftwerk's machines but remaining himself: a genially insane savant still ahead of his time. Heroes, which stands out from the crowd, essentially follows the same recipe, but in warmer tones. In the still-immured German city, his music recalled the halcyon days of the raging punk movement that was thundering in his native England. Flanked by mad machines (once again piloted by Eno) and weird guitars (by  Robert Fripp, ex-member of King Crimson), Bowie channelled his experiments with electronic flavours (Neuköln) into compositions with more rounded melodies (Heroes, The Beauty And The Beast, Joe The Lion). Heroes is above all the cult album which would mark both new wave and the cold wave that followed… Released in May 1979, Lodger closes the Berlin period in a more consensual (but less passionate) spirit. Recorded at Montreux and in New York by Tony Visconti, with Brian Eno still to hand, it features a Bowie who is having fun taking a look into world music, and in particular at the work of the group Talking Heads. This is hardly surprising, when we note that David Byrne's group was then working with Eno... Nevertheless, the ensemble remains startling and less homogeneous than the two previous records. After this avant-garde trilogy, the British artist casts off some of his froideur, but not the madness, of his experiments with genre, with Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) which came out in 1980. Between self-assured modern funk (Fashion and its angular groove) and a re-visited new wave (Ashes To Ashes), he paints a new rainbow, as dense as ever, and still in step with the many currents of its time. A perfect marriage of the 70s and 80s, this brilliant neo-punk cabaret contains powerful compositions that are classic in content and daring in form. Forever in search of the unexpected, the Thin White Duke takes on board a post-Television song from Tom Verlaine (Kingdom Come), invites The Who's Pete Townshend to play on Because You're Young, and, on half of the tracks, offers Robert Fripp crazy, out-of-control guitar sequences. Alongside remasters of Low, Heroes, Lodger, Stage and Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps), this box set offers Lodger remixed and co-produced by Visconti, Re:Call 3, a compilation of singles, B-sides and rarities including Heroes sung in German and French. © MZ/Qobuz