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Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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Pop - Released June 19, 2020 | Verve Forecast

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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released December 13, 2019 | Republic Records

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The second album from explosive trio City Morgue, the aptly titled City Morgue, Vol. 2: As Good as Dead progresses the group's fusing of rap styles, pushing their metal-trap sonics into yet untapped directions. While still containing the key elements of their trademark metal-trap sound, the group use Vol. 2 to diversify their approach: though still laden with scream-driven bangers, the project delivers BONES and $uicideboy$-inspired emo rap ("DRAINO," "MINIMIZE," "THE BALLOONS") in equal measure. Running just 34 minutes over its 17-track run, the project keeps it short and sweet, complementing Thraxx's alternative production with features from Denzel Curry and IDK. © David Crone /TiVo
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Rock - Released December 13, 2019 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released December 6, 2019 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released December 6, 2019 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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At the close of 1963, the Rolling Stones were, for want of a better word, on a -- roll. They'd done okay if not great the previous summer with their debut single, a cover of a Chuck Berry obscurity called "Come On," which was more energetic than 99 percent of its competition, and then roared into the Top 20 in November with a follow up single, a savage rendition of the Lennon-McCartney song "I Wanna Be Your Man," complete with slide guitar and a bass that sounded like its amplifier was cranked up to 12. And then they were ready to take the next step. No; not an LP, which in those days was reserved for relative elites in the music business, but an EP, an extended-play single, containing four songs and priced accordingly higher. It would presumably generate twice the revenue and show some more of what the band could do. At the time, this didn't include songwriting, which they'd only just started trying to do in earnest (especially after seeing how Paul McCartney and John Lennon had delivered "I Wanna Be Your Man" to them on the spot, as a favor). So the question was, what songs would be on the EP (rather unimaginatively titled The Rolling Stones)? They'd previously struggled to find a second single -- before Lennon and McCartney stepped in -- trying and failing -- with results that were closer to a limp version of "The Little Drummer Boy" than to anything by the Coasters -- to cut one of their favorite American songs, Leiber & Stoller's "Poison Ivy." This time, with the single still riding the charts and -- as a cover of a new Beatles song at a time when the Beatles were the hottest music act in England -- getting the group lots of television and radio exposure, the solution came a little easier. They didn't have to look beyond their own favorites -- it was back to Chuck Berry and a slashing rendition of his four-year-old "Bye Bye Johnny," a favorite of Keith Richards', rebuilt from the ground up with a tempo that started out in fourth and jumped to overdrive and then threw in the super-charger on the guitar break, Richards and Brian Jones' interlocking guitars propelling the song into space around Mick Jagger's raspy lead vocals; then it was time to cross swords with the Beatles on a Motown number, "Money," which they carried into punkier territory, with more sneer and attitude than John Lennon and company had mustered earlier that year. (And maybe it was here that the seed was planted for that notion that the Stones always seemed to try what the Beatles had done three months earlier, except that this time it worked on the basis of sheer wattage and Mick Jagger's intensity). The real centerpiece was Arthur Alexander's "You Better Move On," another American-spawned favorite that the band had been doing in concert -- this was their chance to show a softer, more lyrical and soulful sound that was every bit as intense as the blues and hard R&B they'd already done on record; and they did it with some exquisite harmony singing by Bill Wyman and Brian Jones (before the latter surrendered the microphone to Keith Richards), showing off yet another new attribute on record -- it was also no accident that the Alexander song was the only one of these four to get a second life in an American release, picked up by London Records in 1965 when the latter was assembling the December's Children LP. And, finally, there was "Poison Ivy," which the band salvaged with a ballsier rendition, sporting a harder guitar sound and a great showcase for Charlie Watts' playing as well. It all worked, as the resulting extended-play release, despite its higher price, reached the singles charts and also became the group's first number one hit, reaching that coveted slot on the EP sales listings for England in early 1964 and riding that chart for 11 weeks. Within five weeks of its release, the group -- still working at songwriting -- would record and release a follow up single, "Not Fade Away" b/w "Little by Little," that took all of the elements in evidence on this EP several steps further. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released December 1, 1972 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released January 11, 1972 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released September 4, 1970 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released September 12, 1969 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released September 12, 1969 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet
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Rock - Released December 6, 1968 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Recorded between 1968 and 1972, The Rolling Stone’s Beggars Banquet is a real rock’n’roll feast. One of the biggest feasts in history no doubt! Right from the first few shamanic bars of Sympathy For The Devil, it’s evident that Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were trying to summon demons with their wickedly raw music. Blues, violence, rhythm'n'blues, sex, country, African music, revolt, soul, drugs and lust – there’s nothing missing from this electric frenzy. With its satanic prose, the album is carried by haunted guitars and minimalist rhythms. Here, the blue note either sweats buckets (Parachute Woman) or appears completely stripped down (Prodigal Son and Factory Girl). Rock had never been so poisonous and fascinating (Street Fighting Man). Richards releases bursts of demented guitar riffs while Jagger sings with unprecedented power and sincerity. The Stones would continue to build on this momentum with three other masterpieces: Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Exile On Main Street. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz