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Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 25, 2021 | Goliath Enterprises Limited

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
With Skeleton Tree (2016) and Ghosteen (2019), Nick Cave signed a double lease on Heaven and Hell. Carnage finds the leader of the Bad Seeds still holding down both joints, far from average men, closer to some unknown divinity. The album does not bear the name of his illustrious band, but of his double, his musical director for eons: Warren Ellis. With Carnage, the two Australians keep one foot in the latest mystical and electronic work of the Bad Seeds, while looking resolutely straight ahead. A few weeks before its release, Cave described Carnage as “a brutal but very beautiful record nested in a communal catastrophe” – the pandemic, of course… The sprechgesang he loves is still here, accentuating the power of his sermons. Meanwhile, mad-scientist Ellis invariably finds the appropriate sound – strings, vintage synths, drunken piano, UFO noises, anything goes – to push these irrational and poetic texts to a holistic artistic elsewhere.In the grandiose White Elephant, the fascinating approach pays off with a choral worthy of Lennon’s Give Peace a Chance.  In Balcony Man, Cave and Ellis move into almost experimental terrain before taking the opposite direction with an offbeat piano/violin duet. In fact, throughout Carnage the duo enjoy fitting together differing ambiences, interweaving styles, even if that means imploding the traditional framework of the song. Brutal and yes, very beautiful, it is no easy feat to enter this parallel universe unlike any other. Planet Rock may be teeming with species, but Nick Cave remains his own unique animal, ceaselessly questioning his artistic convictions. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 12, 2021 | Clap Your Hands Say Yeah

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It's a long time since the halcyon days of fame and hype for this strangely-named band (the five words were originally graffiti on a Brooklyn wall) led by a boy named Alec Ounsworth. 2005 saw a first album hailed by the critics and celebrated by Pitchfork, the music site of record. David Bowie and David Byrne were spotted at Clap Your Hands Say Yeah concerts. The years went by and four members successively left the ship, but its founder and leader has not said - or sung - his last word... Self-released, New Fragility - turns out to be also a new strength. Its ten lively tracks, go back over events that have affected Ounsworth: like a massacre in Southern California, on the twilit Thousand Oaks, or a reflection on feelings of exhaustion at the state and slide of a lost America on Hesitating Nation. A lover of fine literature, Ounsworth has also chosen the title of this album probably as a tribute and a nod to an essay by the enfant terrible of American literature, David Foster Wallace, who passed away in 2008. The album's title track, New Fragility, sounds astonishingly like an old U2 number from the 80s, in the era of The Unforgettable Fire (1984): right from the start, a shearing synth sound opens the way, followed by the drums... But Ounsworth's voice is far from that of the Irish tenor, rather close to a Thom Yorke, plaintive, carrying his share of melancholy like a flower in the buttonhole, and disillusioned, as on Mirror Song which is full of memories and regrets. Because this album also deals with a personal crisis following an intense but terribly destructive relationship, which left the singer with a bruised soul, certain tracks sing of our hero's sadness, such as Went Looking For Trouble or Where They Perform Miracles. Alec Ounsworth proves with this record that once the hype has ebbed away, other things remain, which can be more essential, and more relevant. This is in any case the feeling one is left with by this album. The most convincing example is probably CYHSY, 2005, a kind of yellowed polaroid from the past, which leaves a bitter taste in the singer's mouth as he realises that all this was not necessarily what he had wanted... © Yan Céh / Qobuz
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International Pop - Released February 5, 2021 | Boots Enterprises, Inc.

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If you were Frank Sinatra's daughter and wanted a career in music, how would you go about stepping out of your father's shadow? After a couple of cutesy singles cut with the producer behind Annette Funicello records, Nancy Sinatra, Frank's oldest child found her groove as the kind of female badass rebel that her father likely adored: fashion influencer who brought miniskirts from Carnaby Street to America's Main Street; daring agitator who shared a rare interracial kiss with dad's pal Sammy Davis Jr. on national TV; Playboy cover star at age 54. It's the attitude and image that's given her career a lasting aura and made it influential for artists as diverse as Primal Scream, Morrissey and Lana Del Rey who has modestly referred to herself as a "Gangster Nancy Sinatra." As this well-curated compilation proves, Sinatra's most influential music comes from her '60s collaboration with oddball pop chameleon Lee Hazlewood. Although the pair's vaguely sensual duet on the still puzzling, hippie-cowboy epic, "Some Velvet Morning," earned them artistic credibility, the crowning achievement of their partnership and Sinatra's calling card was 1965's "These Boots Are Made For Walkin'"—a Hazlewood original that he originally intended to sing. Sinatra convinced him it needed a women's voice to turn it from a tale of spousal abuse to one of female empowerment. Her instincts proved prescient and her deadpan delivery and Hazlewood's snappy production style built around an unforgettable bass line birthed a defiant feminist '60s anthem. Other Sinatra/Hazlewood numbers included here are the fuzz guitar march, "Lightning's Girls," a tremolo-guitar led version of "Bang Bang" (Cher's first million selling single), and duets that charted with Hazlewood: "Summer Wine," "Jackson." The ace card in the Sinatra/Hazlewood union was using Los Angeles studio vets the Wrecking Crew as the backing band. With pros like Hal Blaine on drums, Al Casey, Glen Campbell and Larry Carlton on guitar and Carol Kaye on bass, it's all well-recorded and beautifully mixed music, solid and stylish, and brimming with a confident Angelino brand of white pop soul. © Robert Baird/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 5, 2021 | Entrance Records & Tapes

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Pop - Released January 29, 2021 | Polydor Records

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She was set to be one of the revelations of 2020. But the pandemic got in the way, and Celeste Epiphany Waite postponed the planned release of her first album. Celeste is a new UK sensation. She received the Rising Star prize at the prestigious Brit Awards, an honour which has been bestowed upon such promising young people as Sam Smith or Adele, who went on to enjoy colossal success and international stardom. Add another nomination, for the BBC's Sound of 2020, and the growing interest in this newcomer to the global pop scene was clear. While waiting for the album, Celeste did not sit idly by. She provided some vocals for the high-flying soundtrack for Pixar's successful Soul, and for the series The Chicago Seven, which was broadcast on Netflix. In terms of musical education, Celeste was brought up almost exclusively on blues, jazz, and golden-age soul by James Brown, Aretha Franklin (whom Celeste worships), Nina Simone and Sarah Vaughan. A coppery, nonchalant voice, tinged with a hoarse fragility, Celeste instantly sounds like a little sister to Adele and Amy Winehouse. Finally, the album is here. With its nose-thumbing title, Not Your Muse is an impressive engine, perfectly conceived and calibrated to conquer airwaves around the world, and audiences too. From Strange's skin-tight tenderness to the old-school sixties throwback Love is Back, to the party number Tonight Tonight, all the ingredients are there to make this album a must-have for years to come. © Yan Céh/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 29, 2021 | Atlantic Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Heralds of alt-rock, the Californians Weezer keep churning out albums one after the other as if it was no bother at all. This is their fourteenth album: a sign of rare vitality for members of this scene. Under the leadership of their frontman, songwriter and lead singer Rivers Cuomo, the group still affects the same nervousness crossed with a certain melancholy. They endure thanks to an extraordinary ability to adapt to a perpetually-changing environment. They have moved onto YouTube and are cracking the codes of new networks in a way that few groups of the same genre have managed to do. Weezer, with an unfailingly creative approach to their music videos, are still there - and so are their fans. With the offbeat and retro aesthetic which they have cultivated since their debut in 1994, which was produced by the great Ric Ocasek (leader of Cars), it was an easy choice for Weezer to make an album of covers of powerful eighties songs: 2019's Teal Album. With a cover of A-Ha's Take On Me garnering more than 23 million views on YouTube... Another post-modern hobby of Cuomo's is making concept albums with the help of an orchestra. Inspired by a 1970 album by Harry Nilsson featuring songs by Randy Newman (Nilsson Sings Newman) as well as The Beach Boys' 1966 landmark Pet Sounds, Weezer are in gala attire here, accompanied by an army of thirty-eight musicians. Piano, violins, cellos, flutes... From the first piece, All My Favorite Songs, the stage is set, Rivers Cuomo is enjoying himself and cheerfully pastiching the Beatles and McCartney's Wings (the strings were recorded at Abbey Road Studios). This is a powerful influence on Playing My Piano and its syrupy vocal flights. OK Human shows a new facet of Rivers Cuomo's immense talent, leaving behind his saturated guitars for a classic pop sound that is a little unctuous: but the writer's irony is never lost from sight. The irony is even in the title of the record, OK Human, a nod to Radiohead's OK Computer (1997). Another familiar feature: the CD's playtime is 30 minutes. OK Human is a pleasant interlude before a return to the rock and guitars of the next album, Van Weezer, a tribute to Van Halen, which is set to arrive just a few weeks after this release... © Yan Céh / Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2020 | Bad Seed Ltd

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The time of Nick Cave the rock’n’roll radical is long gone. Once an erratic punk showman possessed by the ghosts of old greats like Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Howlin’ Wolf and others… Time has very much smoothed down those edges, the Australian now dips his quill in a very different ink following the death of his son at the age of 15. With Skeleton Tree (2016) and Ghosteen (2019), the Bad Seeds frontman’s art transformed into a mystical outlet. Creation in grief, for grief. It is often through grief that stories of humanity are told and these albums provide a crushing reminder of this fact. Released in Autumn 2020, Idiot Prayer is solemn in form but not substance. Voluntarily yes, but mostly due to the 2020 pandemic. Nick Cave is thus alone here, without his Bad Seeds or anyone else for that matter. Just him and a piano in Alexandra Palace, London. The performance was transmitted live online on the 23rd of July 2020. For this unique performance, the setlist goes beyond his last two albums (from which he plays only three songs) and sees Cave trawl through old Bad Seeds records (Stranger Than Kindness, The Ship Song, Black Hair, (Are You) the One That I’ve Been Waiting For, The Mercy Seat…) and his other group, Grinderman (Man in the Moon, Palaces of Montezuma…). Only one new composition is included, Euthanasia, a melancholic hymn and study of loss…His magnificent voice resonates within this grandiose 19th century Victorian palace enveloping the author in words of flesh and blood, surrealist and candid poetry. Nick Cave resembles here Robert Mitchum’s character in The Night of the Hunter who tattoos the words LOVE and HATE onto each of his hands and makes them fight each other. Through mixing love songs, murder ballads and tortured hymns, the Australian crooner offers a most beautiful treasure trove, a guided tour of his oeuvre. And such limited instrumentals bring out the best in his voice (he has rarely sung so well) strengthening his old songs tenfold. Marvellous. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2020 | Domino Recording Co

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Punk / New Wave - Released November 20, 2020 | House Arrest

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2020 | Captured Tracks

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2020 | Péché Mignon - Grand Musique Management

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 23, 2020 | 4AD

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 23, 2020 | Balcoon

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 23, 2020 | Transgressive

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Songhoy Blues formed in 2012 after three of its members fled northern Mali following the Islamic radicalist takeover of parts of the country. Settling in Bamako, Mali's capital, the group gigged hard throughout the city, and began playing and recording in the U.K. within a few short years. The band reached wider exposure through international touring, appearances in the 2015 documentary They Will Have to Kill Us First, and the release of their Nick Zinner-produced debut album, Music in Exile. Subsequent releases included collaborations with Iggy Pop, Femi Kuti, and Will Oldham. Optimisme is their third full-length, and without question, it comes closer to capturing the ecstatic energy of their concerts better than anything else they've recorded. Produced by Matt Sweeney (Chavez, Superwolf, the Desert Sessions), the album has a bold crunch to it, immediately channeling the group's hard rock influences on riff-happy opener "Badala." Kinetic, effects-laden tracks like "Assadja" and "Gabi" are at once psychedelic, proggy, and danceable -- building tight, knotty polyrhythms seems second nature to the musicians, and the inventive production adds to the songs' allure without diluting their power. "Fey Fey" is a highly potent Afrobeat rhythm distilled into three minutes, while "Pour Toi" starts out slower and more reserved before breaking into a rousing disco beat. As the album's title indicates, an undying sense of optimism is at the heart of the band's music. Mainly written in the Songhay language, the songs' lyrics are hopeful yet realistic, confronting the corrupt, oppressive, misogynistic establishment and praising all who remain strong and continue to work at bettering their communities. The English-sung "Worry" is the album's most direct, universal statement of encouragement and persistence, and easily one of their catchiest, most anthemic songs. The band is at the top of their game and the songs all sound great, but more importantly, the messages they're expressing have never been more relevant. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 22, 2020 | 4AD

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
Before Big Thief became indie-folk-rock fans’ favourite band, their singer Adrianne Lenker released three solo albums: Stages of the Sun (2006), Hours Were the Birds (2014) and Abysskiss (2018). This time around, the folk fairy does even more with even less. Sat alone with her acoustic guitar, she recorded this double album (available separately under the simple titles Songs and Instrumentals) in a cabin in the Berkshires in Massachusetts. You can hear the wood crackling. Birds and insects as well. And even her fingers sliding around on her strings. With every second, the real world slips away a little more. And her fragile voice is like a magnet that pulls you into every melody... She explores classic themes like loneliness, break-up and regret with a hypnotising, stripped-back sound that brings the likes of Vashti Bunyan, Judee Sill, Elliott Smith and Joni Mitchell (obvious influences for the Big Thief singer). Adrianne Lenker often uses repetition, like on the moving song Come where you can hear the rain outside. Sometimes, it’s space that she focuses on (My Angel). Each song is soft and intimate. The two long instrumental pieces (21 and 16 minutes) that make up the second part require more attention but prove to be totally in line with the songs on the first record. You’re left stunned by just how refined both albums are. A sublime work that will easily stand the test of time. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 16, 2020 | Concord Records

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A band is like a couple, the secret to a long-lasting relationship is to how to reserve time for yourself. Such is the case with American band The National who have been together for 20 years. Here, their singer, Matt Berninger, has undergone his first project outside the band, but he is not alone. Tens of musicians have participated in Serpentine Prison including Gail Ann Dorsey (Bowie’s loyal former bassist among others), Mickey Raphael (Willie Nelson’s lucky harmonicist), Andrew Bird, as well as even three members of The National. The album is produced by the legendary Booker T. Jones, who also contributes on the keys. This star-studded line-up have created a modest work in contrast to the blockbuster album you might expect. Less rock-oriented than with The National, Berninger toes the line between acoustic and the genre the Americans and Brits would refer to as “singer-songwriter”, a strain of folk and country where the lyrics are as important as the music itself. With its American style, the album sounds like the soundtrack to a night-time road trip with moments of ecstasy, reverie and even weariness. With his deep vocals and elegantly minimalistic accompaniments (piano, guitars, light brass sections), Matt Berninger confidently blends traces of crooners like Nick Cave and Leonard Cohen. Pleasantly produced, Serpentine Prison plunges the listener into the delights of a dreamy autumn scene. A trip into the depths America that only music can make reachable. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2020 | Heavenly Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
Sharp, dry and unyielding, the neo-post punk scene, making waves in the UK, is hitting the dance floors thanks to Working Men’s Club. With their first album, Eponym, the young quartet from Todmorden, near Manchester, reignite the flames that once burned with New Order (Power, Corruption & Lies), The Fall, Human League, Gang of Four, D.A.F and Suicide. The young frontman Sydney Minsky-Sargeant sets the scene: ‘There isn’t much to do in Todmorden when you’re a kid. The Town is quite isolated and it can be very depressing to live in a place where, in winter, sunlight only lasts a few hours.' Locked in his room, Minsky-Sargeant spent his time tinkering with and mixing synthesisers, guitars and drums. The record blends chanting vocals, Stakhanovite rhythms, sickly guitar riffs and massive bass sounds. It's easy to lose control of one's body as it grooves and contorts to the rhythm of this unusual acid electro-rock, often reminiscent of early LCD Soundsystem. Minsky-Sargeant sports a t shirt marked with the word ‘SOCIALISM’ as the group christen their song John Cooper Clarke (the ever-popular punk poet), lighting up the grey skies of their native Yorkshire. Occasionally, Minsky-Sargeant relaxes into hedonistic new wave with tracks like Outside. But when he loses his temper, the electro-funk-tinged disco punk oozes from his soul (Teeth). This is a truly stunning record with impressively tight production, courtesy of Ross Orton (The Fall, M.I.A, Arctic Monkeys). No time to lose, have a listen! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 25, 2020 | Reprise

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Unless System Of A Down reunites and proves us otherwise, there's no nu-metal band that's aged better than Deftones. Sure, the Sacramento group has always veered closer to alt-metal auteurs like Tool and A Perfect Circle than Korn or Limp Bizkit, and if that maturity came at the cost of some cheap commercial hits back in the day, then it's paid off tenfold in the long haul. On their ninth record Ohms, their first in four years, Deftones are a bunch of guys pushing 50 who sound fresher and more energized than most metal bands half their age. The band spent the 2010s toying with increasingly experimental and cerebral concepts—the sort of thing artsy bands do when they're 15 years into the game—but Ohms is a brilliant and undeniable return to form. The album marks a reunion with their original producer Terry Date (who worked the boards for their first four records), but it also brings some new blood into the fold: guitarist Stephen Carpenter's nine-string guitar. The beastly axe allows for subterranean low-ends that sound spectacular in contrast to Chino Moreno's soaring vocals. On songs like "Error" and "Radiant City," the palm-muted chugs recall gurgling djent tones, adding a rejuvenating heft to Deftones' signature blend of dreamy and dastardly. Beyond the exquisite production and all-around knockout performances, Ohms is just a great collection of songs. "Ceremony" features a smashing chorus, just a total wallop of a song, while tracks like the surging, spastic "This Link Is Dead" and the metalcore-ish "Urantia" center their unmatched might. The record's title-track closer features a bluesy riff that splatters into gangly shredding, ending the album on a mountainous peak that brings to mind early Mastodon. Considering how long Deftones have been at it, Ohms is technically a late-career record. But in this instance, at least, age is just a number. This band sounds like they're just hitting their stride. © Eli Enis/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2020 | X-Ray Production

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2020 | Castle Face

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When a band have released as many albums as Thee Oh Sees, or as they are known now Osees, it would make sense that occasionally they would put out a dog, or at the very least some fraying around the edges may start to show. John Dwyer and his crew show no signs of letdown, burnout, or stagnation on 2020's Protean Threat, the group's 300th record, more or less. It's just as weird, fiery, hooky, strange, and avant-punk as anything they've released; the unbroken hot streak they're on continues to throw off sparks like an overheating amp that's about to catch fire. Their last couple records took the band's formula and twisted it into complex, proggy shapes, sometimes stretching the songs long past the punk-approved three-minute time limit. Here, the group stuff all their experimental exploration into much shorter songs, invest them with some real-world lyric concerns, and inject most of them with rocket fuel. Much of the album has the jagged, buzzing insanity of early Oh Sees records, but where those records were blasts of noise, here the jazz and prog influences the band have gotten into so deeply invest the songs with a chewy oddness that helps them hit harder than they might otherwise. The album kicks off with a couple songs that scrape the ceiling with their intensity and untamed energy. "Scramble Suit" has thrillingly abrasive jolts of static, and on the herky-jerky "Dreary Nonsense" the swirling guitars sound like two avant-garde saxophonists battling to a breathless draw. After this assault on the senses, they immediately pull back on the throttle with a pair of creepy-crawly midtempo jams -- "Upbeat Ritual" and "Red Study" -- that trade out the skronk in favor of a malevolent restraint. The rest of the record jumps between these two sides of the garage-prog scale. Tracks like "Mizmuth" and "Persuaders Up!" peel the paint from the walls with the fuzz-sharpened guitars, pummeling double-drum attack, and Dwyer's yelped vocals, while the synth-damaged "Wing Run" and the wizardly proggy "If I Had My Way" sneak into the pleasure center of the brain quietly instead of knocking the door right down. The band are equally adept at both -- as they have proven over and over -- and only seem to be getting better as they absorb more influences and subvert them to their own purposes. Protean Threat is their most focused and intense record in a few years and the change is welcome, like a deep breath after a long battle scene. Speaking of that, it's definitely a struggle to make good, verging on great, records over a long career; most bands fold like a tomato can facing Ali, but the Osees are winning with ease. © Tim Sendra /TiVo