Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 18, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res Distinctions Grammy Awards
It’s important to remember that before becoming a gold-standard pop star, Taylor Swift grew up on Nashville country music. Music City's folklore now seems a long way off for the thirty-year-old singer. However, Taylor Swift has never stopped dipping her pen into the same ink as her cowgirl elders, perfectly handling romance, heartbreak, introspection, sociopolitical commentary and personal experiences, such as when she sang of her mother’s cancer on Soon You’ll Get Better… It was in lockdown, with restricted means and limited casting, that she put together Folklore, released in the heart of summer 2020. The first surprise here is Aaron Dessner on production. By choosing The National’s guitarist, whom she considers one of her idols, Swift has opted for a musician with sure-footed tastes and boosted her credibility among indie music fans. She hammers this home on Exile with Justin ‘Bon Iver’ Vernon (the album’s only duet), a close friend of Dessner's with whom he formed Big Red Machine.This surprising, even unusual album for Swift is by no means a calculated attempt to flirt with the hipsters. And it really is unusual for her! No pop bangers, nor the usual dig aimed at Kanye West; the album is free of supercharged beats and has delicate instrumentation (piano, acoustic guitar, Mellotron, mandolin, slides…). Folklore toes a perfect line between silky neo-folk and dreamy rock. It’s as if the star had tucked herself away in a cabin in the forest to dream up new ideas, much like Bon Iver did in his early days… By laying her music bare and relieving it of its usual chart music elements, Taylor Swift has added more substance to her discography. This is clear on August, which would never have resonated as well if it had been produced by a Max Martin type… Upon announcing the album, Swift wrote online: “Before this year I probably would’ve overthought when to release this music at the ‘perfect’ time, but the times we’re living in keep reminding me that nothing is guaranteed. My gut is telling me that if you make something you love, you should just put it out into the world.” A wise decision for a beautiful and mature record. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 24, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
It’s important to remember that before becoming a gold-standard pop star, Taylor Swift grew up on Nashville country music. Music City's folklore now seems a long way off for the thirty-year-old singer. However, Taylor Swift has never stopped dipping her pen into the same ink as her cowgirl elders, perfectly handling romance, heartbreak, introspection, sociopolitical commentary and personal experiences, such as when she sang of her mother’s cancer on Soon You’ll Get Better… It was in lockdown, with restricted means and limited casting, that she put together Folklore, released in the heart of summer 2020. The first surprise here is Aaron Dessner on production. By choosing The National’s guitarist, whom she considers one of her idols, Swift has opted for a musician with sure-footed tastes and boosted her credibility among indie music fans. She hammers this home on Exile with Justin ‘Bon Iver’ Vernon (the album’s only duet), a close friend of Dessner's with whom he formed Big Red Machine.This surprising, even unusual album for Swift is by no means a calculated attempt to flirt with the hipsters. And it really is unusual for her! No pop bangers, nor the usual dig aimed at Kanye West; the album is free of supercharged beats and has delicate instrumentation (piano, acoustic guitar, Mellotron, mandolin, slides…). Folklore toes a perfect line between silky neo-folk and dreamy rock. It’s as if the star had tucked herself away in a cabin in the forest to dream up new ideas, much like Bon Iver did in his early days… By laying her music bare and relieving it of its usual chart music elements, Taylor Swift has added more substance to her discography. This is clear on August, which would never have resonated as well if it had been produced by a Max Martin type… Upon announcing the album, Swift wrote online: “Before this year I probably would’ve overthought when to release this music at the ‘perfect’ time, but the times we’re living in keep reminding me that nothing is guaranteed. My gut is telling me that if you make something you love, you should just put it out into the world.” A wise decision for a beautiful and mature record. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 11, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res Booklet
After being the Princess of Nashville and then the World Queen of Pop, might Taylor Swift now be the goddess of indie folk? In the summer of 2020, she released the surprising Folklore. An album produced by Aaron Dessner of the National, on which she performs with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. With no pop bangers, no body-built beats, it's the perfect folk counterpoint, carried by understated instrumentation mixing piano, acoustic guitar, mellotron, mandolin and slide guitar. Barely five months later, Evermore has all the hallmarks of the sequel to Folklore: it might even be its twin. Especially since Bon Iver and the National are still there. The Haim sisters and Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons have joined the ranks of these classy guests. Taylor Swift keeps her folk-pop troubadour costume on, and here becomes more introspective than ever. Her songs offer a precise fusion of real facts and improbable daydreams. Obviously, Folklore's element of surprise is no longer on the agenda. But that doesn't keep the star from coming out with strong lyrics about fame (Gold Rush and Dorothea), separation (Happiness) or the twilight of love (Tolerate It). She says she spent 2020 writing, writing, writing, and her pen clearly got a workout. Not all of her songs are of the same calibre, and Folklore remains superior overall. But taken as a whole, all of these 2020 recordings have tipped her over into another world. The fascinating little craft business that Taylor Swift is running here has shaken up the pop canon to make a sound that's even more personal and universal than ever. It remains to be seen what the world (of Taylor Swift) will look like after... © Marc Zisman / Qobuz
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released August 23, 2019 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
« I forgot that you existed, And I thought that it would kill me, but it didn't. » Does Taylor Swift still hold a grudge ? From the opening moments of Lover, you’d be hard pressed to think otherwise. At a first glance, it would seem that the venomous tongue so prominent on Reputation (2017) is on the warpath again, feuding against Kanye West, Katy Perry or her ex… But the superstar has more tact and good sense than to needlessly prolong any in-fighting. Maintaining a mostly indifferent stance to the much-publicised conflicts, her seventh album blends romantic pop, deep introspection and socio-political commentary on the United States as a whole, whilst never straying too far without reminding us of her country singer-songwriter roots. The first and foremost example is the acoustic gem Lover, where she pays tribute to her partner of three years, Joe Alwyn. Far from being sirupy, she has a few humorous notes: « Swear to be overdramatic and true to my lover / And you'll save all your dirtiest jokes for me ». The waltz’s light-hearted tone is follow by t The Man’s activist synth-pop. She jokes: « If I was flashing my dollars I’d be a bitch not a baller ». The title itself is a clear explicitation of her feminist message – how would she have been portrayed by the media if she had been a man ? – her questioning stance verges on disillusion, albeit with some nuance, with Miss Americana & The Heartbreak Prince. American high schools are reinterpreted as a symbol of the United States’ decline: « American glory faded before me / Now I'm feeling hopeless, ripped up my prom dress / Running through rose thorns, I saw the scoreboard / And ran for my life ». Swift also dedicates You Need To Calm Down to all the homophobic haters, as a way of telling them that their outrage and agitation are in vain.  The best moments of Lover are those where the 29-year old reduces the cotton-candy production to a minimum, letting the listener get a glimpse of her private life – outside of any real-life-fantasy boyfriend. Soon You’ll Get Better could have just been acoustic filler – a simple, calm moment intended to make these 18 tracks more digestible. However,  by tackling her mother’s cancer, the ensuing chaos and panic, and her own feelings about that traumatic time, Swift centers the focus of the album on the diverse experiences of love, with a newfound maturity. Lover might be a pop record, by one of the biggest superstars in the past decade, but it’s also the proof that in 2019, the genre doesn’t necessarily rhyme with empty or tasteless. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€26.99
CD€19.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 7, 2021 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res Booklet
After being the Princess of Nashville and then the World Queen of Pop, might Taylor Swift now be the goddess of indie folk? In the summer of 2020, she released the surprising Folklore. An album produced by Aaron Dessner of the National on which she performs with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. With no pop bangers, no body-built beats, it's the perfect folk counterpoint, carried by understated instrumentation mixing piano, acoustic guitar, mellotron, mandolin and slide guitar. Barely five months later, Evermore has all the hallmarks of the sequel to Folklore: it might even be its twin. Especially since Bon Iver and the National are still there. The Haim sisters and Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons have joined the ranks of these classy guests. Taylor Swift keeps her folk-pop troubadour costume on, and here becomes more introspective than ever. Her songs offer a precise fusion of real facts and improbable daydreams. Obviously, Folklore's element of surprise is no longer on the agenda. But that doesn't keep the star from coming out with strong lyrics about fame (Gold Rush and Dorothea), separation (Happiness) or the twilight of love (Tolerate It). She says she spent 2020 writing, writing, writing, and her pen clearly got a workout. Not all of her songs are of the same calibre and Folklore remains superior overall. But taken as a whole, all of these 2020 recordings have tipped her over into another world. The fascinating little craft business that Taylor Swift is running here has shaken up the pop canon to make a sound that's even more personal and universal than ever. It remains to be seen what the world (of Taylor Swift) will look like after... © Marc Zisman / Qobuz
From
HI-RES€26.99
CD€19.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 21, 2021 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 24, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 21, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€26.99
CD€19.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 25, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 11, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD€16.49

Pop - Released August 23, 2019 | Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift sings "If I was a man, I'd be The Man" on a song that arrives just as Lover, her seventh studio album, starts to get underway. It's not bragging if it's true. Perhaps 2017's Reputation didn't dominate the popular consciousness the way her 2014 pop breakthrough 1989 did, but that was partially by design. Hard and steely, Reputation announced the arrival of an adult Taylor -- a conscious maturation that didn't bother disguising its seams. Lover, in contrast, is a bit messier, almost defiantly so. Swift retains Jack Antonoff -- the former fun. captain who has been at her side since 2014's 1989 -- as her chief collaborator, and while the duo remains besotted by the chillier aspects of late '80s synth pop, not everything here plays like a sleek, sexy update on T'Pau. Certainly, "The Archer" basks within the glow of its retro analog synths, dredging up memories of both "Out of the Woods" and "Heart and Soul," yet its iciness isn't the primary color on Lover. Swift does return to this glassiness on occasion, warming its chill on the mini-epic "Miss Americana & The Heartbreak Prince," but Lover is bright, lively, and openhearted, encompassing a full range of human emotion. Happily, this includes a hefty dose of silliness: never mind the effervescence of "Paper Rings," the closest thing to pure bubblegum Taylor has ever recorded, the inclusion of a spoken introduction from Idris Elba on "London Boy" is giddily goofy. Swift smartly balances these pieces of pure pop with songs that tap into a deep reservoir of complex feelings. Listen closely to "The Man," and it becomes clear the song is neither a boast nor a manifesto but rather a bit of clear-eyed anger at institutional sexism. "The Man" isn't the only place where Swift tackles political issues. On "You Need to Calm Down," she offers an anthem for allies, writing a manifesto that is perhaps a bit too on the nose, but that directness can be an asset. Witness "Soon You'll Get Better," a quivering and candid prayer for healing where she's assisted by the Dixie Chicks; her pleas for her ailing loved one to get better are all the more affecting by being affectless. Swiftian scholars could argue "Soon You'll Get Better" is written for her mother, just like "I Forgot That You Existed" is a riposte against some unnamed online critic, but decoding the inspirations behind Lover diminishes an album so generous and colorful. More than either 1989 or Reputation, Lover seems fully realized and mature: Swift is embracing all aspects of her personality, from the hopeful dreamer to the coolly controlled craftsman, resulting in a record that's simultaneously familiar and surprising. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€16.49

Alternative & Indie - Released August 21, 2020 | Taylor Swift

From
CD€16.49

Alternative & Indie - Released February 4, 2021 | Taylor Swift

From
CD€16.49

Alternative & Indie - Released August 24, 2020 | Taylor Swift

From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 7, 2021 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res Booklet
After being the Princess of Nashville and then the World Queen of Pop, might Taylor Swift now be the goddess of indie folk? In the summer of 2020, she released the surprising Folklore. An album produced by Aaron Dessner of the National on which she performs with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. With no pop bangers, no body-built beats, it's the perfect folk counterpoint, carried by understated instrumentation mixing piano, acoustic guitar, mellotron, mandolin and slide guitar. Barely five months later, Evermore has all the hallmarks of the sequel to Folklore: it might even be its twin. Especially since Bon Iver and the National are still there. The Haim sisters and Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons have joined the ranks of these classy guests. Taylor Swift keeps her folk-pop troubadour costume on, and here becomes more introspective than ever. Her songs offer a precise fusion of real facts and improbable daydreams. Obviously, Folklore's element of surprise is no longer on the agenda. But that doesn't keep the star from coming out with strong lyrics about fame (Gold Rush and Dorothea), separation (Happiness) or the twilight of love (Tolerate It). She says she spent 2020 writing, writing, writing, and her pen clearly got a workout. Not all of her songs are of the same calibre and Folklore remains superior overall. But taken as a whole, all of these 2020 recordings have tipped her over into another world. The fascinating little craft business that Taylor Swift is running here has shaken up the pop canon to make a sound that's even more personal and universal than ever. It remains to be seen what the world (of Taylor Swift) will look like after... © Marc Zisman / Qobuz
From
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 18, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 27, 2020 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€2.99
CD€1.99

Country - Released February 12, 2021 | Taylor Swift

Hi-Res
From
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 24, 2020 | Taylor Swift

From
CD€1.99

Pop - Released December 6, 2019 | Taylor Swift